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Entire Online Archive: "beat and hotel": 273 results 

Paris, France: June 1960. Lunchtime in the cafe. Workmen could have their lunches re-heated on Madame Rachou's gas stove. Peter Golding on the harmonica, Robin Page playing the guitar.  ©Harold Chapman/TopFoto/ The Image Works
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Paris, France: June 1960. Lunchtime in the cafe. Workmen could have their lunches re-heated on Madame Rachou's gas stove. Peter Golding on the harmonica, Robin Page playing the guitar. ©Harold Chapman/TopFoto/ The Image Works
Inside the Beat Hotel: downstairs in a recess adjoining the hotel cafe was the telephone for residents and visitors.  Here a Beat Hotel resident is talking on the phone.  In photographer Harold Chapman's own words, certain rooms in the hotel were privileged and had their own phone otherwise one had to go to the phone in the cafe.  If people were phoned up at the cafe because they had no phone in their room, if they had a light on in their room the "light control panel" downstairs in the cafe would indicate to the hotel owner, Madame Rachou, that they were in and she would flick the switch three times.  Otherwise, during the day she would go out into the street and scream at the top of her voice, for example, "Chambre 21, telephone" and they would come down to the cafe phone.  The phone had a normal handset and additional earphone for someone else to listen in to the conversation.  If you came from the outside to make a phone call in any cafe or bar, the custom was to order a small black coffee, go off and make the telephone call and then go back and pay for the phone call and leave a tip and finish your coffee.  Beat Hotel, 9 rue Git-le-Coeur, Left Bank, Paris 6, 1962.  ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
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Inside the Beat Hotel: downstairs in a recess adjoining the hotel cafe was the telephone for residents and visitors. Here a Beat Hotel resident is talking on the phone. In photographer Harold Chapman's own words, certain rooms in the hotel were privileged and had their own phone otherwise one had to go to the phone in the cafe. If people were phoned up at the cafe because they had no phone in their room, if they had a light on in their room the "light control panel" downstairs in the cafe would indicate to the hotel owner, Madame Rachou, that they were in and she would flick the switch three times. Otherwise, during the day she would go out into the street and scream at the top of her voice, for example, "Chambre 21, telephone" and they would come down to the cafe phone. The phone had a normal handset and additional earphone for someone else to listen in to the conversation. If you came from the outside to make a phone call in any cafe or bar, the custom was to order a small black coffee, go off and make the telephone call and then go back and pay for the phone call and leave a tip and finish your coffee. Beat Hotel, 9 rue Git-le-Coeur, Left Bank, Paris 6, 1962. ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
Paris, France: Piero Heliczer, poet of the "Dead Language Press", visiting the hotel for a free haircut. ©Harold Chapman/TopFoto/ The Image Works
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Paris, France: Piero Heliczer, poet of the "Dead Language Press", visiting the hotel for a free haircut. ©Harold Chapman/TopFoto/ The Image Works
American photographer Bill Cheney moved to a cheap bohemian hotel in the Rue de Vaugirard where the Beats would also stay on their visits to Paris after the Beat Hotel had closed in 1963.  His local cafe was Au Petit Suisse on the corner of Rue Corneille with the longest street in Paris, Rue de Vaugirard, where he is enjoying a cup of coffee with other customers some of whom are also photographers.  He has lent his wide angle lens to photographer Harold Chapman who has removed the lens from his own camera in order to attach this lens to experiment.  Au Petit Suisse, 16 rue de Vaugirard, 6e arrondissement, Left Bank, Paris, France, 1965.  ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
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American photographer Bill Cheney moved to a cheap bohemian hotel in the Rue de Vaugirard where the Beats would also stay on their visits to Paris after the Beat Hotel had closed in 1963. His local cafe was Au Petit Suisse on the corner of Rue Corneille with the longest street in Paris, Rue de Vaugirard, where he is enjoying a cup of coffee with other customers some of whom are also photographers. He has lent his wide angle lens to photographer Harold Chapman who has removed the lens from his own camera in order to attach this lens to experiment. Au Petit Suisse, 16 rue de Vaugirard, 6e arrondissement, Left Bank, Paris, France, 1965. ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
Photographer Bill Cheney, former resident of the Beat Hotel, outside the cafe Au Petit Suisse on the corner of rue Corneille with the longest street in Paris, rue de Vaugirard. A small hotel just round the corner in the rue de Vaugirard was inhabited by ex-residents, refugees and bohemians from the Beat Hotel which had closed in 1963.  Rue de Vaugirard traverses the 6th and 15th arrondissements and is 4.3 kilometres long.  6e arrondissement, Left Bank, Paris, France, 1965.    ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
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Photographer Bill Cheney, former resident of the Beat Hotel, outside the cafe Au Petit Suisse on the corner of rue Corneille with the longest street in Paris, rue de Vaugirard. A small hotel just round the corner in the rue de Vaugirard was inhabited by ex-residents, refugees and bohemians from the Beat Hotel which had closed in 1963. Rue de Vaugirard traverses the 6th and 15th arrondissements and is 4.3 kilometres long. 6e arrondissement, Left Bank, Paris, France, 1965. ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
American photographer Bill Cheney moved to a cheap bohemian hotel in the Rue de Vaugirard where the Beats would also stay on their visits to Paris after the Beat Hotel had closed in 1963.  His local cafe was Au Petit Suisse on the corner of Rue Corneille with the longest street in Paris, Rue de Vaugirard, where he is enjoying a cup of coffee with other customers some of whom are also photographers.  Au Petit Suisse, 16 rue de Vaugirard, 6e arrondissement, Left Bank, Paris, France, 1965.  ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
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American photographer Bill Cheney moved to a cheap bohemian hotel in the Rue de Vaugirard where the Beats would also stay on their visits to Paris after the Beat Hotel had closed in 1963. His local cafe was Au Petit Suisse on the corner of Rue Corneille with the longest street in Paris, Rue de Vaugirard, where he is enjoying a cup of coffee with other customers some of whom are also photographers. Au Petit Suisse, 16 rue de Vaugirard, 6e arrondissement, Left Bank, Paris, France, 1965. ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
Lew Ashkoff, American writer, sitting at his desk in the Beat Hotel surrounded by the typical jumble crammed in the tiny rooms.  Room 40 with a sloping ceiling was one of the garret rooms in the hotel, typifiying the bohemian lifestyle of artists and writers who went to Paris to live the vie de boheme and find creative and cultural freedom.  Beat Hotel, 9 rue Git-le-Coeur, Left Bank, 6e arrondissement, Paris, France, 1959.  ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
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Lew Ashkoff, American writer, sitting at his desk in the Beat Hotel surrounded by the typical jumble crammed in the tiny rooms. Room 40 with a sloping ceiling was one of the garret rooms in the hotel, typifiying the bohemian lifestyle of artists and writers who went to Paris to live the vie de boheme and find creative and cultural freedom. Beat Hotel, 9 rue Git-le-Coeur, Left Bank, 6e arrondissement, Paris, France, 1959. ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
The door to the Beat Hotel in Paris with a Concert Pacra poster in the window announcing concerts for Christmas and New Year's Day.  The Beat Hotel was adapted from an ancient building with an extremely high doorway.  9 rue Git-le-Coeur, 6e arrondissement, Left Bank, Paris, France, 1963.    ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
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The door to the Beat Hotel in Paris with a Concert Pacra poster in the window announcing concerts for Christmas and New Year's Day. The Beat Hotel was adapted from an ancient building with an extremely high doorway. 9 rue Git-le-Coeur, 6e arrondissement, Left Bank, Paris, France, 1963. ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
The Dreamachine was invented by Brion Gysin and his assistant, Ian Sommerville, in the Beat Hotel at 9, rue Git-le-Coeur on the Left Bank.  Gysin persuaded cosmetics magnate Helena Rubinstein to put a prototype of his Dreamachine in her salon window in the rue du Faubourg Saint-Honore, 8e arrondissement, Right Bank, Paris, France, 1963.  ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
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The Dreamachine was invented by Brion Gysin and his assistant, Ian Sommerville, in the Beat Hotel at 9, rue Git-le-Coeur on the Left Bank. Gysin persuaded cosmetics magnate Helena Rubinstein to put a prototype of his Dreamachine in her salon window in the rue du Faubourg Saint-Honore, 8e arrondissement, Right Bank, Paris, France, 1963. ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
Onlookers including children gaze at the Dreamachine.  The Dreamachine was invented by Brion Gysin and his assistant, Ian Sommerville, in the Beat Hotel at 9, rue Git-le-Coeur on the Left Bank.  Gysin persuaded cosmetics magnate Helena Rubinstein to put a prototype of his Dreamachine in her salon window in the rue du Faubourg Saint-Honore, 8e arrondissement, Right Bank, Paris, France, 1963.  ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
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Onlookers including children gaze at the Dreamachine. The Dreamachine was invented by Brion Gysin and his assistant, Ian Sommerville, in the Beat Hotel at 9, rue Git-le-Coeur on the Left Bank. Gysin persuaded cosmetics magnate Helena Rubinstein to put a prototype of his Dreamachine in her salon window in the rue du Faubourg Saint-Honore, 8e arrondissement, Right Bank, Paris, France, 1963. ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
Young lovers walking with their arms round each other near the Beat Hotel, rue Git-le-Coeur, 6e arrondissement, Left Bank, Paris, France, 1960.  ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
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Young lovers walking with their arms round each other near the Beat Hotel, rue Git-le-Coeur, 6e arrondissement, Left Bank, Paris, France, 1960. ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
The Beat Hotel after it had been sold and was being renovated.  The cafe was no longer open, the shelves behind the bar on which bottles of drinks once stood were taken off because there were no customers and no one went into the bar.  In the words of photographer Harold Chapman, "It was shut but I could go in there because I was still living in the hotel and could wander around anywhere I liked."  9 rue Git-le-Coeur, 6e arrondissement, Left Bank, Paris, France, 1963  ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
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The Beat Hotel after it had been sold and was being renovated. The cafe was no longer open, the shelves behind the bar on which bottles of drinks once stood were taken off because there were no customers and no one went into the bar. In the words of photographer Harold Chapman, "It was shut but I could go in there because I was still living in the hotel and could wander around anywhere I liked." 9 rue Git-le-Coeur, 6e arrondissement, Left Bank, Paris, France, 1963 ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
The Dreamachine was invented by Brion Gysin and his assistant, Ian Sommerville, in the Beat Hotel at 9, rue Git-le-Coeur on the Left Bank.  Gysin persuaded cosmetics magnate Helena Rubinstein to put a prototype of his Dreamachine in her salon window in the rue du Faubourg Saint-Honore, 8e arrondissement, Right Bank, Paris, France, 1963.  ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
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The Dreamachine was invented by Brion Gysin and his assistant, Ian Sommerville, in the Beat Hotel at 9, rue Git-le-Coeur on the Left Bank. Gysin persuaded cosmetics magnate Helena Rubinstein to put a prototype of his Dreamachine in her salon window in the rue du Faubourg Saint-Honore, 8e arrondissement, Right Bank, Paris, France, 1963. ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
The cold winter of 1960 on the corner of rue Git-le-Coeur where it joins with the Quai des Grands Augustins.  The new street sign is a trompe-l'oeil painted on the building and the outline of the old enamel sign is clearly visible on the wall underneath.  The old sign was removed during a Government campaign to preserve old fashioned street signs.  The old sign had the 6e arrondissement indicated in the arched top but the new sign does not have the arrondissement.  Left Bank, Paris, France, 1960.   ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
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The cold winter of 1960 on the corner of rue Git-le-Coeur where it joins with the Quai des Grands Augustins. The new street sign is a trompe-l'oeil painted on the building and the outline of the old enamel sign is clearly visible on the wall underneath. The old sign was removed during a Government campaign to preserve old fashioned street signs. The old sign had the 6e arrondissement indicated in the arched top but the new sign does not have the arrondissement. Left Bank, Paris, France, 1960. ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
The restaurant menu of Chez Jean just after the reformation of the currency from old French Francs to new.  Chez Jean in Boulevard St-Germain was a cheap Left Bank restaurant, popular with the Beats, and was one of the few restaurants in Paris that still had a thick layer of sawdust on the floor in the late 1950s.  A lot of people could only afford one meal a day and would eat there because they could not cook in the little hotels.  The nearby Beat Hotel at 9, rue Git-le-Coeur was special because its residents were allowed to cook in their rooms.  The entrance to the restaurant was in the Cour du Commerce Saint-Andre, 6e arrondissement, Left Bank, Paris, France, winter 1957.  ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
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The restaurant menu of Chez Jean just after the reformation of the currency from old French Francs to new. Chez Jean in Boulevard St-Germain was a cheap Left Bank restaurant, popular with the Beats, and was one of the few restaurants in Paris that still had a thick layer of sawdust on the floor in the late 1950s. A lot of people could only afford one meal a day and would eat there because they could not cook in the little hotels. The nearby Beat Hotel at 9, rue Git-le-Coeur was special because its residents were allowed to cook in their rooms. The entrance to the restaurant was in the Cour du Commerce Saint-Andre, 6e arrondissement, Left Bank, Paris, France, winter 1957. ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
Itinerant bohemian photographer, Francois Massal (died in 2007), recently rediscovered when an exhibition of his work was mounted in 2014 in the Chateau de Favieres by his companion, Colette Macintos. In his archives are pictures of Brion Gysin, Madame Rachou and other Beat Hotel residents. Chez Jean in Boulevard St-Germain, on a very cold night where the diners sat wearing their coats.  The entrance to the restaurant was in the Cour du Commerce Saint-Andre, 6e arrondissement, Left Bank, Paris, France, winter 1957.    ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
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Itinerant bohemian photographer, Francois Massal (died in 2007), recently rediscovered when an exhibition of his work was mounted in 2014 in the Chateau de Favieres by his companion, Colette Macintos. In his archives are pictures of Brion Gysin, Madame Rachou and other Beat Hotel residents. Chez Jean in Boulevard St-Germain, on a very cold night where the diners sat wearing their coats. The entrance to the restaurant was in the Cour du Commerce Saint-Andre, 6e arrondissement, Left Bank, Paris, France, winter 1957. ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
Chez Jean in Boulevard St-Germain, on a very cold night where the diners sat wearing their coats.  It was a cheap Left Bank restaurant, one of the few restaurants in Paris that still had a thick layer of sawdust on the floor in the late 1950s.  A lot of people could only afford one meal a day and would eat there because they could not cook in the little hotels.  The nearby Beat Hotel at 9, rue Git-le-Coeur was special because its residents were allowed to cook in their rooms.  The entrance to the restaurant was in the Cour du Commerce Saint-Andre, 6e arrondissement, Left Bank, Paris, France, winter 1957.  ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
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Chez Jean in Boulevard St-Germain, on a very cold night where the diners sat wearing their coats. It was a cheap Left Bank restaurant, one of the few restaurants in Paris that still had a thick layer of sawdust on the floor in the late 1950s. A lot of people could only afford one meal a day and would eat there because they could not cook in the little hotels. The nearby Beat Hotel at 9, rue Git-le-Coeur was special because its residents were allowed to cook in their rooms. The entrance to the restaurant was in the Cour du Commerce Saint-Andre, 6e arrondissement, Left Bank, Paris, France, winter 1957. ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
American Bruce H. Axler (died aged 69 in 2012) lived in Paris in the 1960s learning the art of being a restaurateur.  Photographer Harold Chapman recalls that Axler contacted him after meeting a Beat Hotel resident in the famous central fresh food market of Les Halles.  This photo was taken in 1962 when Axler had got a job for a small magazine published in English in Paris where he was writing a column once a week on Haute Cuisine: Cooking in a Paris Garret.  Later he became the first food critic for the Herald Tribune.  He returned to America and had television programmes and wrote cookbooks.     ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
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American Bruce H. Axler (died aged 69 in 2012) lived in Paris in the 1960s learning the art of being a restaurateur. Photographer Harold Chapman recalls that Axler contacted him after meeting a Beat Hotel resident in the famous central fresh food market of Les Halles. This photo was taken in 1962 when Axler had got a job for a small magazine published in English in Paris where he was writing a column once a week on Haute Cuisine: Cooking in a Paris Garret. Later he became the first food critic for the Herald Tribune. He returned to America and had television programmes and wrote cookbooks. ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
African American expatriate Emil Cadoo (1926-2002) who in 1960 emigrated to Paris to escape racism and became a celebrated photographer of erotic art and double exposures illustrating dust jackets for Grove Press and portfolios for the Evergreen Review.  He is taking a picture using a Pentax camera, a reasonably priced good camera much sought after by serious but impecunious photographers.  He is wearing an artisanal ring on his little finger.  He would sit in Cafe le Conti with a group of other Left Bank photographers to discuss their day's work and take pictures of their friends and people in the cafe, rue Buci, St-Germain-des-Pres, Left Bank, Paris 6, France, 1960.  ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
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African American expatriate Emil Cadoo (1926-2002) who in 1960 emigrated to Paris to escape racism and became a celebrated photographer of erotic art and double exposures illustrating dust jackets for Grove Press and portfolios for the Evergreen Review. He is taking a picture using a Pentax camera, a reasonably priced good camera much sought after by serious but impecunious photographers. He is wearing an artisanal ring on his little finger. He would sit in Cafe le Conti with a group of other Left Bank photographers to discuss their day's work and take pictures of their friends and people in the cafe, rue Buci, St-Germain-des-Pres, Left Bank, Paris 6, France, 1960. ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
African American expatriate Emil Cadoo (1926-2002) who in 1960 emigrated to Paris to escape racism and became a celebrated photographer of erotic art and double exposures illustrating dust jackets for Grove Press and portfolios for the Evergreen Review.  He is taking a picture using a Pentax camera, a reasonably priced good camera much sought after by serious but impecunious photographers.  He is wearing an artisanal ring on his little finger.  He would sit in Cafe le Conti with a group of other Left Bank photographers to discuss their day's work and take pictures of their friends and people in the cafe, rue Buci, St-Germain-des-Pres, Left Bank, Paris 6, France, 1960.  ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
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African American expatriate Emil Cadoo (1926-2002) who in 1960 emigrated to Paris to escape racism and became a celebrated photographer of erotic art and double exposures illustrating dust jackets for Grove Press and portfolios for the Evergreen Review. He is taking a picture using a Pentax camera, a reasonably priced good camera much sought after by serious but impecunious photographers. He is wearing an artisanal ring on his little finger. He would sit in Cafe le Conti with a group of other Left Bank photographers to discuss their day's work and take pictures of their friends and people in the cafe, rue Buci, St-Germain-des-Pres, Left Bank, Paris 6, France, 1960. ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
African American expatriate Emil Cadoo (1926-2002) who in 1960 emigrated to Paris to escape racism and became a celebrated photographer of erotic art and double exposures illustrating dust jackets for Grove Press and portfolios for the Evergreen Review.  He is using a Pentax camera, a reasonably priced good camera much sought after by serious but impecunious photographers.  He is wearing an artisanal ring on his little finger.  He would sit in Cafe le Conti with a group of other Left Bank photographers to discuss their day's work and take pictures of their friends and people in the cafe, rue Buci, St-Germain-des-Pres, Left Bank, Paris 6, France, 1960.  ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
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African American expatriate Emil Cadoo (1926-2002) who in 1960 emigrated to Paris to escape racism and became a celebrated photographer of erotic art and double exposures illustrating dust jackets for Grove Press and portfolios for the Evergreen Review. He is using a Pentax camera, a reasonably priced good camera much sought after by serious but impecunious photographers. He is wearing an artisanal ring on his little finger. He would sit in Cafe le Conti with a group of other Left Bank photographers to discuss their day's work and take pictures of their friends and people in the cafe, rue Buci, St-Germain-des-Pres, Left Bank, Paris 6, France, 1960. ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
African American expatriate Emil Cadoo (1926-2002) who in 1960 emigrated to Paris to escape racism and became a celebrated photographer of erotic art and double exposures illustrating dust jackets for Grove Press and portfolios for the Evergreen Review.  He is taking a picture using a Pentax camera, a reasonably priced good camera much sought after by serious but impecunious photographers.  He is gripping the camera with both hands to hold it steady whilst taking a long time exposure in the dim light of the cafe.  He would sit in Cafe le Conti with a group of other Left Bank photographers to discuss their day's work and take pictures of their friends and people in the cafe, rue Buci, St-Germain-des-Pres, Left Bank, Paris 6, France, 1960.  ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
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African American expatriate Emil Cadoo (1926-2002) who in 1960 emigrated to Paris to escape racism and became a celebrated photographer of erotic art and double exposures illustrating dust jackets for Grove Press and portfolios for the Evergreen Review. He is taking a picture using a Pentax camera, a reasonably priced good camera much sought after by serious but impecunious photographers. He is gripping the camera with both hands to hold it steady whilst taking a long time exposure in the dim light of the cafe. He would sit in Cafe le Conti with a group of other Left Bank photographers to discuss their day's work and take pictures of their friends and people in the cafe, rue Buci, St-Germain-des-Pres, Left Bank, Paris 6, France, 1960. ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
African American expatriate Emil Cadoo (1926-2002) who in 1960 emigrated to Paris to escape racism and became a celebrated photographer of erotic art and double exposures illustrating dust jackets for Grove Press and portfolios for the Evergreen Review.  He is taking a picture using a Pentax camera, a reasonably priced good camera much sought after by serious but impecunious photographers.  He is wearing an artisanal ring on his little finger.  He would sit in Cafe le Conti with a group of other Left Bank photographers to discuss their day's work and take pictures of their friends and people in the cafe, rue Buci, St-Germain-des-Pres, Left Bank, Paris 6, France, 1960.  ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
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African American expatriate Emil Cadoo (1926-2002) who in 1960 emigrated to Paris to escape racism and became a celebrated photographer of erotic art and double exposures illustrating dust jackets for Grove Press and portfolios for the Evergreen Review. He is taking a picture using a Pentax camera, a reasonably priced good camera much sought after by serious but impecunious photographers. He is wearing an artisanal ring on his little finger. He would sit in Cafe le Conti with a group of other Left Bank photographers to discuss their day's work and take pictures of their friends and people in the cafe, rue Buci, St-Germain-des-Pres, Left Bank, Paris 6, France, 1960. ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
Jean-Jacques Lebel, born in Paris in 1936, artist, poet, poetry publisher, political activist, scholar, translator of Beat literature, was a close friend of Beat poet Gregory Corso in the Beat Hotel.  Lebel produced many art events including Happenings. Sitting outside the cafe, Le Rive Gauche, Place Saint-Michel, near the Beat Hotel, Paris 6, France, circa 1962.  ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
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Jean-Jacques Lebel, born in Paris in 1936, artist, poet, poetry publisher, political activist, scholar, translator of Beat literature, was a close friend of Beat poet Gregory Corso in the Beat Hotel. Lebel produced many art events including Happenings. Sitting outside the cafe, Le Rive Gauche, Place Saint-Michel, near the Beat Hotel, Paris 6, France, circa 1962. ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
African American expatriate Emil Cadoo (1926-2002) who in 1960 emigrated to Paris to escape racism and became a celebrated photographer of erotic art and double exposures illustrating dust jackets for Grove Press and portfolios for the Evergreen Review.  He has just taken a picture using a Pentax camera, a reasonably priced good camera much sought after by serious but impecunious photographers.  He is wearing an artisanal ring on his little finger.  He would sit in Cafe le Conti with a group of other Left Bank photographers to discuss their day's work and take pictures of their friends and people in the cafe, rue Buci, St-Germain-des-Pres, Left Bank, Paris 6, France, 1960.  ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works
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African American expatriate Emil Cadoo (1926-2002) who in 1960 emigrated to Paris to escape racism and became a celebrated photographer of erotic art and double exposures illustrating dust jackets for Grove Press and portfolios for the Evergreen Review. He has just taken a picture using a Pentax camera, a reasonably priced good camera much sought after by serious but impecunious photographers. He is wearing an artisanal ring on his little finger. He would sit in Cafe le Conti with a group of other Left Bank photographers to discuss their day's work and take pictures of their friends and people in the cafe, rue Buci, St-Germain-des-Pres, Left Bank, Paris 6, France, 1960. ©Harold Chapman/ The Image Works