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Entire Online Archive: "dean and pictures": 2000 results 

A total of 4427 files matched your search. The oldest files are not included in the result set.

Aplsey House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, Hyde Park Corner, Westminster, London, c1990-2010. View towards doorway in the Waterloo Gallery leading to the Portico Drawing Room. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
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Aplsey House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, Hyde Park Corner, Westminster, London, c1990-2010. View towards doorway in the Waterloo Gallery leading to the Portico Drawing Room. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
Aplsey House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London, c1990-2010. Detail of the North wall and fireplace in the Waterloo Gallery. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
EHIP2649449.jpg
Aplsey House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London, c1990-2010. Detail of the North wall and fireplace in the Waterloo Gallery. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
Apsley House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London, c1990-2010. View of one of the doors in the Waterloo Gallery with one of the Siberian porphyry candelabra. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
EHIP2649460.jpg
Apsley House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London, c1990-2010. View of one of the doors in the Waterloo Gallery with one of the Siberian porphyry candelabra. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
Apsley House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London, c1990-2010. View of the Waterloo Gallery. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
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Apsley House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London, c1990-2010. View of the Waterloo Gallery. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
Aplsey House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, Hyde Park Corner, Westminster, London, c1990-2010. Detail of the north wall and fireplace in the Waterloo Gallery. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
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Aplsey House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, Hyde Park Corner, Westminster, London, c1990-2010. Detail of the north wall and fireplace in the Waterloo Gallery. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
Waterloo Gallery, Apsley House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London. c1990-2010. Interior view. The Waterloo Gallery. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
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Waterloo Gallery, Apsley House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London. c1990-2010. Interior view. The Waterloo Gallery. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
Piccadilly Drawing Room, Apsley House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London. c1990-2010. Interior view of the Piccadilly Drawing Room. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, is a Grade I Listed building, run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
EHIP2649499.jpg
Piccadilly Drawing Room, Apsley House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London. c1990-2010. Interior view of the Piccadilly Drawing Room. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, is a Grade I Listed building, run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
Apsley House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London. c1990-2010. View of the Piccadilly Drawing Room. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
EHIP2649500.jpg
Apsley House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London. c1990-2010. View of the Piccadilly Drawing Room. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
Apsley House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London, c1990-2010. View of the North wall and fireplace in the Waterloo Gallery with one of the Siberian porphyry candelabra to the left. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
EHIP2649459.jpg
Apsley House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London, c1990-2010. View of the North wall and fireplace in the Waterloo Gallery with one of the Siberian porphyry candelabra to the left. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
Japan: Ainu man with ikupasuy prayer stick, Hokkaido, 1901 - The Ainu or in historical Japanese texts Ezo, are an indigenous people of Japan (Hokkaido, and formerly northeastern Honshu) and Russia (Sakhalin and the Kuril Islands).  Historically, they spoke the Ainu language and related varieties and lived in Hokkaidō, the Kuril Islands, and much of Sakhalin. Most of those who identify themselves as Ainu still live in this same region, though the exact number of living Ainu is unknown. This is due to confusion over mixed heritages and to ethnic issues in Japan resulting in those with Ainu backgrounds hiding their identities.  In Japan, because of intermarriage over many years with Japanese, the concept of a pure Ainu ethnic group is no longer feasible. Official estimates of the population are of around 25,000, while the unofficial number is upward of 200,000 people.  ©Dean Bashford/Pictures From History/The Image Works
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Japan: Ainu man with ikupasuy prayer stick, Hokkaido, 1901 - The Ainu or in historical Japanese texts Ezo, are an indigenous people of Japan (Hokkaido, and formerly northeastern Honshu) and Russia (Sakhalin and the Kuril Islands).

Historically, they spoke the Ainu language and related varieties and lived in Hokkaidō, the Kuril Islands, and much of Sakhalin. Most of those who identify themselves as Ainu still live in this same region, though the exact number of living Ainu is unknown. This is due to confusion over mixed heritages and to ethnic issues in Japan resulting in those with Ainu backgrounds hiding their identities.

In Japan, because of intermarriage over many years with Japanese, the concept of a pure Ainu ethnic group is no longer feasible. Official estimates of the population are of around 25,000, while the unofficial number is upward of 200,000 people. ©Dean Bashford/Pictures From History/The Image Works
Copenhagen, Denmark: July 5, 2012.  Declining birth rates in Denmark have some worried about the future of the country's welfare system. Picture shows a pregnant woman walking on the street.   ©Francis Dean / Dean Pictures / The Image Works
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Copenhagen, Denmark: July 5, 2012. Declining birth rates in Denmark have some worried about the future of the country's welfare system. Picture shows a pregnant woman walking on the street. ©Francis Dean / Dean Pictures / The Image Works
United States: 'The Wise Men', left to right  Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge, Dean Acheson, General Omar Bradley, President Lyndon B. Johnson, White House dining room, 26 March 1968 - The Second Indochina War, known in America as the Vietnam War, was a Cold War era military conflict that occurred in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955 to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975. This war followed the First Indochina War and was fought between North Vietnam, supported by its communist allies, and the government of South Vietnam, supported by the U.S. and other anti-communist nations. The U.S. government viewed involvement in the war as a way to prevent a communist takeover of South Vietnam and part of their wider strategy of containment.  The North Vietnamese government viewed the war as a colonial war, fought initially against France, backed by the U.S., and later against South Vietnam, which it regarded as a U.S. puppet state. U.S. military advisors arrived beginning in 1950. U.S. involvement escalated in the early 1960s, with U.S. troop levels tripling in 1961 and tripling again in 1962. U.S. combat units were deployed beginning in 1965. Operations spanned borders, with Laos and Cambodia heavily bombed. Involvement peaked in 1968 at the time of the Tet Offensive.  U.S. military involvement ended on 15 August 1973. The capture of Saigon by the North Vietnamese army in April 1975 marked the end of the US-Vietnam War.  ©Yoichi R Okamoto/Pictures From History/The Image Works
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United States: 'The Wise Men', left to right Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge, Dean Acheson, General Omar Bradley, President Lyndon B. Johnson, White House dining room, 26 March 1968 - The Second Indochina War, known in America as the Vietnam War, was a Cold War era military conflict that occurred in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955 to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975. This war followed the First Indochina War and was fought between North Vietnam, supported by its communist allies, and the government of South Vietnam, supported by the U.S. and other anti-communist nations. The U.S. government viewed involvement in the war as a way to prevent a communist takeover of South Vietnam and part of their wider strategy of containment.

The North Vietnamese government viewed the war as a colonial war, fought initially against France, backed by the U.S., and later against South Vietnam, which it regarded as a U.S. puppet state. U.S. military advisors arrived beginning in 1950. U.S. involvement escalated in the early 1960s, with U.S. troop levels tripling in 1961 and tripling again in 1962. U.S. combat units were deployed beginning in 1965. Operations spanned borders, with Laos and Cambodia heavily bombed. Involvement peaked in 1968 at the time of the Tet Offensive.

U.S. military involvement ended on 15 August 1973. The capture of Saigon by the North Vietnamese army in April 1975 marked the end of the US-Vietnam War. ©Yoichi R Okamoto/Pictures From History/The Image Works
USA / Vietnam / Phillipines: American and Vietnamese politicians meet at the Manila Conference, 23 October 1966 - Left to Right: Secretary of State Dean Rusk, Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge, unknown, Robert Komer, President Lyndon B. Johnson, General William Westmoreland, Prime Minister Nguyen Cao Ky (South Vietnam), Walt Rostow, Lieutenant General Nguyen Van Thieu (South Vietnam).  ©Yoichi R Okamoto/Pictures From History/The Image Works
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USA / Vietnam / Phillipines: American and Vietnamese politicians meet at the Manila Conference, 23 October 1966 - Left to Right: Secretary of State Dean Rusk, Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge, unknown, Robert Komer, President Lyndon B. Johnson, General William Westmoreland, Prime Minister Nguyen Cao Ky (South Vietnam), Walt Rostow, Lieutenant General Nguyen Van Thieu (South Vietnam). ©Yoichi R Okamoto/Pictures From History/The Image Works
USA: 'The Wise Men', senior American functionaries during the Vietnam War meet at a White House luncheon, 26 March 1968 - Left to Right: General Creighton Abrams, George Ball, Assistant Press Secretary Tom Johnson, General Maxwell Taylor, McGeorge Bundy, General Matthew Ridgway, Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge, Dean Acheson, President Lyndon B. Johnson, General Omar Bradley, Ambassador Averell Harriman, Secretary of Defense Clark Clifford, Cyrus Vance, Walt Rostow, Secretary of State Dean Rusk.  ©Yoichi R Okamoto/Pictures From History/The Image Works
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USA: 'The Wise Men', senior American functionaries during the Vietnam War meet at a White House luncheon, 26 March 1968 - Left to Right: General Creighton Abrams, George Ball, Assistant Press Secretary Tom Johnson, General Maxwell Taylor, McGeorge Bundy, General Matthew Ridgway, Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge, Dean Acheson, President Lyndon B. Johnson, General Omar Bradley, Ambassador Averell Harriman, Secretary of Defense Clark Clifford, Cyrus Vance, Walt Rostow, Secretary of State Dean Rusk. ©Yoichi R Okamoto/Pictures From History/The Image Works
Copenhagen.Denamrk  - 22 April 2015_ Ms. Mette Frederiksen Danish minister for justice ,social democrat  and former minister for social affairs at press conference todayat minister office       ©Francis J Dean/Dean Pictures /The Image Works
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Copenhagen.Denamrk - 22 April 2015_ Ms. Mette Frederiksen Danish minister for justice ,social democrat and former minister for social affairs at press conference todayat minister office ©Francis J Dean/Dean Pictures /The Image Works
Copenhagen.Denamrk  - 22 April 2015_ Ms. Mette Frederiksen Danish minister for justice ,social democrat  and former minister for social affairs at press conference todayat minister office       ©Francis J Dean/Dean Pictures /The Image Works
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Copenhagen.Denamrk - 22 April 2015_ Ms. Mette Frederiksen Danish minister for justice ,social democrat and former minister for social affairs at press conference todayat minister office ©Francis J Dean/Dean Pictures /The Image Works
Copenhagen , Denamrk  22 April 2015_  Menu Sareen social and integration minister at press conference today at ministry for justice  ©Francis J Dean/Dean Pictures /The Image Works
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Copenhagen , Denamrk 22 April 2015_ Menu Sareen social and integration minister at press conference today at ministry for justice ©Francis J Dean/Dean Pictures /The Image Works
England / UK: Section of the earth's crust with extinct animals and fossils, from William Buckland, Geology and Mineralogy considered with respect to Natural Theology (1837), vol. 2 - William Buckland DD FRS (12 March 1784 – 14 August 1856) was an English theologian who became Dean of Westminster. He was also a geologist and palaeontologist, writing the first full account of a fossil dinosaur, which he named Megalosaurus. His work proving that Kirkdale Cave had been a prehistoric hyena den, for which he was awarded the Copley Medal, was praised as an example of how scientific analysis could reconstruct events from the distant past. He was a pioneer in the use of fossilised faeces, for which he coined the term coprolites, to reconstruct ancient ecosystems.  Buckland was a proponent of the Gap Theory that interpreted the biblical account of Genesis as referring to two separate episodes of creation separated by a lengthy period; it emerged in the late 18th and early 19th centuries as a way to reconcile the scriptural account with discoveries in geology that suggested the earth was very old. Early in his career he believed that he had found geologic evidence of the biblical flood, but later became convinced that the glaciation theory of Louis Agassiz provided a better explanation, and he played an important role in promoting that theory in Great Britain.  ©Pictures From History/The Image Works
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England / UK: Section of the earth's crust with extinct animals and fossils, from William Buckland, Geology and Mineralogy considered with respect to Natural Theology (1837), vol. 2 - William Buckland DD FRS (12 March 1784 – 14 August 1856) was an English theologian who became Dean of Westminster. He was also a geologist and palaeontologist, writing the first full account of a fossil dinosaur, which he named Megalosaurus. His work proving that Kirkdale Cave had been a prehistoric hyena den, for which he was awarded the Copley Medal, was praised as an example of how scientific analysis could reconstruct events from the distant past. He was a pioneer in the use of fossilised faeces, for which he coined the term coprolites, to reconstruct ancient ecosystems.

Buckland was a proponent of the Gap Theory that interpreted the biblical account of Genesis as referring to two separate episodes of creation separated by a lengthy period; it emerged in the late 18th and early 19th centuries as a way to reconcile the scriptural account with discoveries in geology that suggested the earth was very old. Early in his career he believed that he had found geologic evidence of the biblical flood, but later became convinced that the glaciation theory of Louis Agassiz provided a better explanation, and he played an important role in promoting that theory in Great Britain. ©Pictures From History/The Image Works
KASTRUP, COPENHAGEN, DENMARK - Muslim home, muslim immgrants leave shoes outside their main door, 13 April 2014  ©Francis Dean / Dean Pictures / The Image Works
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KASTRUP, COPENHAGEN, DENMARK - Muslim home, muslim immgrants leave shoes outside their main door, 13 April 2014 ©Francis Dean / Dean Pictures / The Image Works
KASTRUP, COPENHAGEN, DENMARK - Muslim home, muslim immgrants leave shoes outside their main door, 13 April 2014  ©Francis Dean / Dean Pictures / The Image Works
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KASTRUP, COPENHAGEN, DENMARK - Muslim home, muslim immgrants leave shoes outside their main door, 13 April 2014 ©Francis Dean / Dean Pictures / The Image Works
Karachi, Pakistan: Pepsi cola delivery truck on street. April 2014. ©Ilyas Dean / Dean Pictures / The Image Works
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Karachi, Pakistan: Pepsi cola delivery truck on street. April 2014. ©Ilyas Dean / Dean Pictures / The Image Works
Karachi, Pakistan: Pepsi cola delivery truck on street. April 2014. ©Ilyas Dean / Dean Pictures / The Image Works
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Karachi, Pakistan: Pepsi cola delivery truck on street. April 2014. ©Ilyas Dean / Dean Pictures / The Image Works
Karachi, Pakistan - Roman Catholic church members during Palm Sunday procession in Azam Basti. April 2014. ©Ilyas Dean / Dean Pictures / The Image Works
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Karachi, Pakistan - Roman Catholic church members during Palm Sunday procession in Azam Basti. April 2014. ©Ilyas Dean / Dean Pictures / The Image Works
Karachi, Pakistan - Roman Catholic church members during Palm Sunday procession in Azam Basti. April 2014. ©Ilyas Dean / Dean Pictures / The Image Works
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Karachi, Pakistan - Roman Catholic church members during Palm Sunday procession in Azam Basti. April 2014. ©Ilyas Dean / Dean Pictures / The Image Works
Karachi, Pakistan - Roman Catholic church members during Palm Sunday procession in Azam Basti. April 2014. ©Ilyas Dean / Dean Pictures / The Image Works
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Karachi, Pakistan - Roman Catholic church members during Palm Sunday procession in Azam Basti. April 2014. ©Ilyas Dean / Dean Pictures / The Image Works

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