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Entire Online Archive: "dean and pictures": 2000 results 

A total of 4448 files matched your search. The oldest files are not included in the result set.

Aplsey House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, Hyde Park Corner, Westminster, London, c1990-2010. View towards doorway in the Waterloo Gallery leading to the Portico Drawing Room. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
EHIP2649448.jpg
Aplsey House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, Hyde Park Corner, Westminster, London, c1990-2010. View towards doorway in the Waterloo Gallery leading to the Portico Drawing Room. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
Aplsey House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London, c1990-2010. Detail of the North wall and fireplace in the Waterloo Gallery. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
EHIP2649449.jpg
Aplsey House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London, c1990-2010. Detail of the North wall and fireplace in the Waterloo Gallery. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
Apsley House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London, c1990-2010. View of one of the doors in the Waterloo Gallery with one of the Siberian porphyry candelabra. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
EHIP2649460.jpg
Apsley House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London, c1990-2010. View of one of the doors in the Waterloo Gallery with one of the Siberian porphyry candelabra. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
Apsley House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London, c1990-2010. View of the Waterloo Gallery. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
EHIP2649574.jpg
Apsley House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London, c1990-2010. View of the Waterloo Gallery. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
Aplsey House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, Hyde Park Corner, Westminster, London, c1990-2010. Detail of the north wall and fireplace in the Waterloo Gallery. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
EHIP2649450.jpg
Aplsey House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, Hyde Park Corner, Westminster, London, c1990-2010. Detail of the north wall and fireplace in the Waterloo Gallery. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
Waterloo Gallery, Apsley House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London. c1990-2010. Interior view. The Waterloo Gallery. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
EHIP2649498.jpg
Waterloo Gallery, Apsley House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London. c1990-2010. Interior view. The Waterloo Gallery. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
Piccadilly Drawing Room, Apsley House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London. c1990-2010. Interior view of the Piccadilly Drawing Room. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, is a Grade I Listed building, run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
EHIP2649499.jpg
Piccadilly Drawing Room, Apsley House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London. c1990-2010. Interior view of the Piccadilly Drawing Room. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, is a Grade I Listed building, run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
Apsley House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London. c1990-2010. View of the Piccadilly Drawing Room. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
EHIP2649500.jpg
Apsley House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London. c1990-2010. View of the Piccadilly Drawing Room. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
Apsley House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London, c1990-2010. View of the North wall and fireplace in the Waterloo Gallery with one of the Siberian porphyry candelabra to the left. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
EHIP2649459.jpg
Apsley House, c1990-2010. Artist: Nigel Corrie. Apsley House, London, c1990-2010. View of the North wall and fireplace in the Waterloo Gallery with one of the Siberian porphyry candelabra to the left. Also known as Number One, London, Apspley is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner. Construction began in 1771 by architect Robert Adam for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington with extensive renovations by Benjamin Dean Wyatt. The house, a Grade I Listed building, is run by English Heritage. ©Historic England / Heritage / The Image Works
Japan: Ainu man with ikupasuy prayer stick, Hokkaido, 1901 - The Ainu or in historical Japanese texts Ezo, are an indigenous people of Japan (Hokkaido, and formerly northeastern Honshu) and Russia (Sakhalin and the Kuril Islands).  Historically, they spoke the Ainu language and related varieties and lived in Hokkaidō, the Kuril Islands, and much of Sakhalin. Most of those who identify themselves as Ainu still live in this same region, though the exact number of living Ainu is unknown. This is due to confusion over mixed heritages and to ethnic issues in Japan resulting in those with Ainu backgrounds hiding their identities.  In Japan, because of intermarriage over many years with Japanese, the concept of a pure Ainu ethnic group is no longer feasible. Official estimates of the population are of around 25,000, while the unofficial number is upward of 200,000 people.  ©Dean Bashford/Pictures From History/The Image Works
ECPA0032530.jpg
Japan: Ainu man with ikupasuy prayer stick, Hokkaido, 1901 - The Ainu or in historical Japanese texts Ezo, are an indigenous people of Japan (Hokkaido, and formerly northeastern Honshu) and Russia (Sakhalin and the Kuril Islands).

Historically, they spoke the Ainu language and related varieties and lived in Hokkaidō, the Kuril Islands, and much of Sakhalin. Most of those who identify themselves as Ainu still live in this same region, though the exact number of living Ainu is unknown. This is due to confusion over mixed heritages and to ethnic issues in Japan resulting in those with Ainu backgrounds hiding their identities.

In Japan, because of intermarriage over many years with Japanese, the concept of a pure Ainu ethnic group is no longer feasible. Official estimates of the population are of around 25,000, while the unofficial number is upward of 200,000 people. ©Dean Bashford/Pictures From History/The Image Works
"Canterbury under fire" - Damage sustained to the Cathedal LIbrary examined by Dr. Hewlett Johnson, Dean of Canterbury, by bombing on the city by German planes of the luftwaffe during WW2. The Baedeker Blitz (or Baedeker raids) were targeted raids, chosen for hitting sites of cultural or historical significance, rather than for any military value. The raid on Canterbury (which coincided with the RAF's 1,000 bomber raid on Cologne), involved 77 bombers, dropping 40 tons of bombs, resulting in 43 deaths. This raid hit Canterbury on 31st May, 1942.     Date: 1942  ©Mary Evans / Grenville Collins / The Image Works
EMEP0997492.jpg
"Canterbury under fire" - Damage sustained to the Cathedal LIbrary examined by Dr. Hewlett Johnson, Dean of Canterbury, by bombing on the city by German planes of the luftwaffe during WW2. The Baedeker Blitz (or Baedeker raids) were targeted raids, chosen for hitting sites of cultural or historical significance, rather than for any military value. The raid on Canterbury (which coincided with the RAF's 1,000 bomber raid on Cologne), involved 77 bombers, dropping 40 tons of bombs, resulting in 43 deaths. This raid hit Canterbury on 31st May, 1942. Date: 1942 ©Mary Evans / Grenville Collins / The Image Works
Scenes from The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel  ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
EMEP0986307.jpg
Scenes from The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
A scene from The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel  ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
EMEP0986303.jpg
A scene from The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
Mabel Poulton in The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel  ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
EMEP0986300.jpg
Mabel Poulton in The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
Scenes from The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel  ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
EMEP0986316.jpg
Scenes from The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
Scenes from The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel  ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
EMEP0986311.jpg
Scenes from The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
Ivor Novello and Mabel Poulton in The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel  ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
EMEP0986299.jpg
Ivor Novello and Mabel Poulton in The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
A scene from The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel  ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
EMEP0986304.jpg
A scene from The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
A scene from The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel with Ivor Novello & Mabel Poulton  ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
EMEP0986305.jpg
A scene from The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel with Ivor Novello & Mabel Poulton ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
A scene from The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel  ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
EMEP0986312.jpg
A scene from The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
Scenes from The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel  ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
EMEP0986315.jpg
Scenes from The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
A scene from The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel  ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
EMEP0986317.jpg
A scene from The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
Scenes from The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel  ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
EMEP0986313.jpg
Scenes from The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
Scenes from The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel  ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
EMEP0986309.jpg
Scenes from The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
A scene from The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel with Ivor Novello conducting  ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works
EMEP0986306.jpg
A scene from The Constant Nymph (1928) directed by Basil Dean & Adrian Brunel with Ivor Novello conducting ©Mary Evans / Jazz Age Club Collection / The Image Works

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