• Archives
  • Tools
Layout
Show:
Save

Entire Online Archive: "natural and history": 2000 results 

A total of 42011 files matched your search. The oldest files are not included in the result set.

Feb 19, 2017. Boston, MA. Thousands of people turned out for a Stand Up for the Rally to Stand Up for Science, which was organized by the Natural History Museum, ClimateTruth.org and a number of other groups, including the Union of Concerned Scientists. It was timed to coincide with the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), also occurring in downtown Boston. Scientists and supporters rallied in Copley Square Sunday to call for a fight against President Trump’s efforts to discredit science and climate research, and to dismantle scientific institutions in the government. © 2017 Marilyn Humphries Boston, Massachusetts - February 19, 2017 Thousands of people turned out for a Stand Up for the Rally to Stand Up for ScienceScientists and supporters rallied in Copley Square Sunday to call for a fight against President Trump’s efforts to discredit science and climate research, and to dismantle scientific institutions in the government. © Marilyn Humphries The Image Works
EHUM0538368.jpg
Feb 19, 2017. Boston, MA.
Thousands of people turned out for a Stand Up for the Rally to Stand Up for Science, which was organized by the Natural History Museum, ClimateTruth.org and a number of other groups, including the Union of Concerned Scientists. It was timed to coincide with the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), also occurring in downtown Boston. Scientists and supporters rallied in Copley Square Sunday to call for a fight against President Trump’s efforts to discredit science and climate research, and to dismantle scientific institutions in the government.
© 2017 Marilyn Humphries Boston, Massachusetts - February 19, 2017
Thousands of people turned out for a Stand Up for the Rally to Stand Up for ScienceScientists and supporters rallied in Copley Square Sunday to call for a fight against President Trump’s efforts to discredit science and climate research, and to dismantle scientific institutions in the government.
© Marilyn Humphries The Image Works
Feb 19, 2017. Boston, MA. Thousands of people turned out for a Stand Up for the Rally to Stand Up for Science, which was organized by the Natural History Museum, ClimateTruth.org and a number of other groups, including the Union of Concerned Scientists. It was timed to coincide with the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), also occurring in downtown Boston. Scientists and supporters rallied in Copley Square Sunday to call for a fight against President Trump’s efforts to discredit science and climate research, and to dismantle scientific institutions in the government. © 2017 Marilyn Humphries Boston, Massachusetts - February 19, 2017 Thousands of people turned out for a Stand Up for the Rally to Stand Up for ScienceScientists and supporters rallied in Copley Square Sunday to call for a fight against President Trump’s efforts to discredit science and climate research, and to dismantle scientific institutions in the government. © Marilyn Humphries The Image Works
EHUM0538369.jpg
Feb 19, 2017. Boston, MA.
Thousands of people turned out for a Stand Up for the Rally to Stand Up for Science, which was organized by the Natural History Museum, ClimateTruth.org and a number of other groups, including the Union of Concerned Scientists. It was timed to coincide with the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), also occurring in downtown Boston. Scientists and supporters rallied in Copley Square Sunday to call for a fight against President Trump’s efforts to discredit science and climate research, and to dismantle scientific institutions in the government.
© 2017 Marilyn Humphries Boston, Massachusetts - February 19, 2017
Thousands of people turned out for a Stand Up for the Rally to Stand Up for ScienceScientists and supporters rallied in Copley Square Sunday to call for a fight against President Trump’s efforts to discredit science and climate research, and to dismantle scientific institutions in the government.
© Marilyn Humphries The Image Works
Coccolithus pelagicus - A coccolithophorid from the South Atlantic showing the ball of tiny plates enclosing the protoplasm.   © The Natural History Museum / The Image Works
ENHM0030418.jpg
Coccolithus pelagicus - A coccolithophorid from the South Atlantic showing the ball of tiny plates enclosing the protoplasm. © The Natural History Museum / The Image Works
Flying ant amber - A flying ant preserved in Baltic amber.  This specimen dates from the Upper Eocene period. Natural History Museum,  London, U.K  © The Natural History Museum / The Image Works
ENHM0021597.jpg
Flying ant amber - A flying ant preserved in Baltic amber. This specimen dates from the Upper Eocene period. Natural History Museum, London, U.K © The Natural History Museum / The Image Works
Italy: Icon of Vespasian (9-79), 9th Roman emperor, from the book Icones imperatorvm romanorvm (Icons of Roman Emperors), Antwerp, c. 1645 - From an equestrian family that rose to senatorial rank under the Julio-Claudian dyansty, Vespasianus - as he was then called - earned much renown through his military record. He first served during the Roman invasion of Britain in 43 CE, and was later sent by Emperor Nero to conquer Judea in 66 CE, during the Jewish rebellion.  During his siege of Jerusalem, news came to him of Nero's suicide and the tumultuous civil war that happened afterwards, later known as the Year of the Four Emperors. When Vitellius became the third emperor in April 69, the Roman legions of Egypt and Judea declared Vespasian the new emperor. Marching to Rome, he defeated and executed Vitellius, becoming emperor and ending the Year of the Four Emperors.  He ruled the Roman empire for 10 years, building the Flavian Amphitheatre, known nowadays as the Roman Colosseum, as well as enacting various reforms to the empire. He died in 79 CE, and his son Titus became the next Roman emperor, starting the Flavian dynasty and making Vespasian the first emperor to be directly succeeded by his own natural son.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034478.jpg
Italy: Icon of Vespasian (9-79), 9th Roman emperor, from the book Icones imperatorvm romanorvm (Icons of Roman Emperors), Antwerp, c. 1645 - From an equestrian family that rose to senatorial rank under the Julio-Claudian dyansty, Vespasianus - as he was then called - earned much renown through his military record. He first served during the Roman invasion of Britain in 43 CE, and was later sent by Emperor Nero to conquer Judea in 66 CE, during the Jewish rebellion.

During his siege of Jerusalem, news came to him of Nero's suicide and the tumultuous civil war that happened afterwards, later known as the Year of the Four Emperors. When Vitellius became the third emperor in April 69, the Roman legions of Egypt and Judea declared Vespasian the new emperor. Marching to Rome, he defeated and executed Vitellius, becoming emperor and ending the Year of the Four Emperors.

He ruled the Roman empire for 10 years, building the Flavian Amphitheatre, known nowadays as the Roman Colosseum, as well as enacting various reforms to the empire. He died in 79 CE, and his son Titus became the next Roman emperor, starting the Flavian dynasty and making Vespasian the first emperor to be directly succeeded by his own natural son. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Vietnam: Vietnamese vessels begin dredging operations on Ladd Reef or Da Lat, Spratly Islands, in a move designed to preclude Chinese expansion in the area, December 2016 - The Spratly Islands are a group of more than 750 reefs, islets, atolls, cays and islands in the South China Sea. The archipelago lies off the coasts of the Philippines and Malaysia (Sabah), about one third of the way to southern Vietnam. They comprise less than four square kilometers of land area spread over more than 425,000 square kilometers of sea. The Spratlys are one of three archipelagos of the South China Sea which comprise more than 30,000 islands and reefs and which complicate governance and economics in that region of Southeast Asia.  Such small and remote islands have little economic value in themselves, but are important in establishing international boundaries. There are no native islanders but there are rich fishing grounds and initial surveys indicate the islands may contain significant reserves of oil and natural gas.  About 45 islands are occupied by relatively small numbers of military forces from Vietnam, the People's Republic of China, the Republic of China (Taiwan), Malaysia and the Philippines. Brunei has also claimed an Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) in the southeastern part of the Spratlys encompassing just one area of small islands above mean high water (on Louisa Reef.)  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0033906.jpg
Vietnam: Vietnamese vessels begin dredging operations on Ladd Reef or Da Lat, Spratly Islands, in a move designed to preclude Chinese expansion in the area, December 2016 - The Spratly Islands are a group of more than 750 reefs, islets, atolls, cays and islands in the South China Sea. The archipelago lies off the coasts of the Philippines and Malaysia (Sabah), about one third of the way to southern Vietnam. They comprise less than four square kilometers of land area spread over more than 425,000 square kilometers of sea. The Spratlys are one of three archipelagos of the South China Sea which comprise more than 30,000 islands and reefs and which complicate governance and economics in that region of Southeast Asia.

Such small and remote islands have little economic value in themselves, but are important in establishing international boundaries. There are no native islanders but there are rich fishing grounds and initial surveys indicate the islands may contain significant reserves of oil and natural gas.

About 45 islands are occupied by relatively small numbers of military forces from Vietnam, the People's Republic of China, the Republic of China (Taiwan), Malaysia and the Philippines. Brunei has also claimed an Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) in the southeastern part of the Spratlys encompassing just one area of small islands above mean high water (on Louisa Reef.) ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Vietnam: Extended runway to take fighter jet aircraft on Dao Truong Sa or Spratly Island in the Spratly Islands, 2016 - The Spratly Islands are a group of more than 750 reefs, islets, atolls, cays and islands in the South China Sea. The archipelago lies off the coasts of the Philippines and Malaysia (Sabah), about one third of the way to southern Vietnam. They comprise less than four square kilometers of land area spread over more than 425,000 square kilometers of sea. The Spratlys are one of three archipelagos of the South China Sea which comprise more than 30,000 islands and reefs and which complicate governance and economics in that region of Southeast Asia.  Such small and remote islands have little economic value in themselves, but are important in establishing international boundaries. There are no native islanders but there are rich fishing grounds and initial surveys indicate the islands may contain significant reserves of oil and natural gas.  About 45 islands are occupied by relatively small numbers of military forces from Vietnam, the People's Republic of China, the Republic of China (Taiwan), Malaysia and the Philippines. Brunei has also claimed an Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) in the southeastern part of the Spratlys encompassing just one area of small islands above mean high water (on Louisa Reef.)  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0033905.jpg
Vietnam: Extended runway to take fighter jet aircraft on Dao Truong Sa or Spratly Island in the Spratly Islands, 2016 - The Spratly Islands are a group of more than 750 reefs, islets, atolls, cays and islands in the South China Sea. The archipelago lies off the coasts of the Philippines and Malaysia (Sabah), about one third of the way to southern Vietnam. They comprise less than four square kilometers of land area spread over more than 425,000 square kilometers of sea. The Spratlys are one of three archipelagos of the South China Sea which comprise more than 30,000 islands and reefs and which complicate governance and economics in that region of Southeast Asia.

Such small and remote islands have little economic value in themselves, but are important in establishing international boundaries. There are no native islanders but there are rich fishing grounds and initial surveys indicate the islands may contain significant reserves of oil and natural gas.

About 45 islands are occupied by relatively small numbers of military forces from Vietnam, the People's Republic of China, the Republic of China (Taiwan), Malaysia and the Philippines. Brunei has also claimed an Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) in the southeastern part of the Spratlys encompassing just one area of small islands above mean high water (on Louisa Reef.) ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
The Smith Memorial Congregational Church, a Christian church,  was built in honor of English missionary Rev. John Smith who was sentenced to death for teaching slaves to read the Bible.  He was accused of inciting the slaves to revolt in the Demerara Rebellion of 1823.  The church was completed in 1844 and is 173 years old.  Georgetown, Guyana. 2016 © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
EVAW0535482.jpg
The Smith Memorial Congregational Church, a Christian church, was built in honor of English missionary Rev. John Smith who was sentenced to death for teaching slaves to read the Bible. He was accused of inciting the slaves to revolt in the Demerara Rebellion of 1823. The church was completed in 1844 and is 173 years old. Georgetown, Guyana. 2016 © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
Interior architectural detail of ceiling woodwork. The Church of Saint Mary of Loreto, Achao, Quinchao Island was built in 1730 and declared a National Monument of Chile in 1951. The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of  architecture.  Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate.  Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions.  They are an excellent example of mestizo culture.  Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. 2005  © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
EVAW0535473.jpg
Interior architectural detail of ceiling woodwork. The Church of Saint Mary of Loreto, Achao, Quinchao Island was built in 1730 and declared a National Monument of Chile in 1951. The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of architecture. Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate. Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions. They are an excellent example of mestizo culture. Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. 2005 © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
Interior architectural detail of ceiling woodwork.  The Church of Saint Mary of Loreto, Achao, Quinchao Island was built in 1730 and declared a National Monument of Chile in 1951. The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of  architecture.  Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate.  Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions.  They are an excellent example of mestizo culture.  Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. 2005  © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
EVAW0535464.jpg
Interior architectural detail of ceiling woodwork. The Church of Saint Mary of Loreto, Achao, Quinchao Island was built in 1730 and declared a National Monument of Chile in 1951. The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of architecture. Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate. Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions. They are an excellent example of mestizo culture. Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. 2005 © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
Exterior view. The Church of Saint Mary of Loreto, Achao, Quinchao Island was built in 1730 and declared a National Monument of Chile in 1951. The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of  architecture.  Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate.  Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions.  They are an excellent example of mestizo culture.  Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. 2005  © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
EVAW0535459.jpg
Exterior view. The Church of Saint Mary of Loreto, Achao, Quinchao Island was built in 1730 and declared a National Monument of Chile in 1951. The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of architecture. Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate. Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions. They are an excellent example of mestizo culture. Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. 2005 © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
St. George's Anglican Cathedral in Georgetown, Guyana, at 143 feet tall, is one of the tallest timber-built buildings in the world.  It was dedicated in 1894 and is a National Monument in Guyana.  Interior view. 2016 © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
EVAW0535460.jpg
St. George's Anglican Cathedral in Georgetown, Guyana, at 143 feet tall, is one of the tallest timber-built buildings in the world. It was dedicated in 1894 and is a National Monument in Guyana. Interior view. 2016 © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
Interior architectural detail of the nave. The Church of Saint Mary of Loreto, Achao, Quinchao Island was built in 1730 and declared a National Monument of Chile in 1951. The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of  architecture.  Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate.  Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions.  They are an excellent example of mestizo culture.  Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. 2005  © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
EVAW0535461.jpg
Interior architectural detail of the nave. The Church of Saint Mary of Loreto, Achao, Quinchao Island was built in 1730 and declared a National Monument of Chile in 1951. The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of architecture. Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate. Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions. They are an excellent example of mestizo culture. Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. 2005 © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
Christ Church, in Georgetown, Guyana, was built 1836 in the style of an English country church, though built of timber instead of stone. 2016 © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
EVAW0535454.jpg
Christ Church, in Georgetown, Guyana, was built 1836 in the style of an English country church, though built of timber instead of stone. 2016 © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
The recently-restored wooden Church of Vilupulli.  The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of  architecture.  Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate.  Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions.  They are an excellent example of mestizo culture.  Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. 2005  © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
EVAW0535456.jpg
The recently-restored wooden Church of Vilupulli. The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of architecture. Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate. Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions. They are an excellent example of mestizo culture. Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. 2005 © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
The Light House, Georgetown, Guyana was built of brick in 1830 to replace an earlier wooden one built by the Dutch.  It is octagonal in shape and rises 103 feet.  It is a Guyana National Monument.  The Stabroek Market clock tower is visible to the left in the distance.  The view is looking down Water Street toward the docks on the Demerara River.  The stacks of the power generation plant are on the right in the foreground. 2016 © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
EVAW0535457.jpg
The Light House, Georgetown, Guyana was built of brick in 1830 to replace an earlier wooden one built by the Dutch. It is octagonal in shape and rises 103 feet. It is a Guyana National Monument. The Stabroek Market clock tower is visible to the left in the distance. The view is looking down Water Street toward the docks on the Demerara River. The stacks of the power generation plant are on the right in the foreground. 2016 © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
Church of Our Lady of Grace of Nercón, or Iglesia de Señora de Gracia de Nercón, Chiloe Island, Chile was made a National Monument of Chile in 1984.  It is considered as one of the best examples of Chiloe Chilota architecture. The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of  architecture.  Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate.  Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions.  They are an excellent example of mestizo culture.  Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. 2005  © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
EVAW0535451.jpg
Church of Our Lady of Grace of Nercón, or Iglesia de Señora de Gracia de Nercón, Chiloe Island, Chile was made a National Monument of Chile in 1984. It is considered as one of the best examples of Chiloe Chilota architecture. The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of architecture. Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate. Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions. They are an excellent example of mestizo culture. Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. 2005 © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
The Church of Chonchi or Church of St. Charles Borromeo, Conchi, Chiloe Island, was made a National Monument of Chile in 1971.  The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of  architecture.  Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate.  Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions.  They are an excellent example of mestizo culture.  Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. 2005  © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
EVAW0535452.jpg
The Church of Chonchi or Church of St. Charles Borromeo, Conchi, Chiloe Island, was made a National Monument of Chile in 1971. The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of architecture. Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate. Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions. They are an excellent example of mestizo culture. Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. 2005 © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
St. George's Anglican Cathedral in Georgetown, Guyana, at 143 feet tall, is one of the tallest timber-built buildings in the world.  It was dedicated in 1894 and is a National Monument in Guyana. 2016 © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
EVAW0535447.jpg
St. George's Anglican Cathedral in Georgetown, Guyana, at 143 feet tall, is one of the tallest timber-built buildings in the world. It was dedicated in 1894 and is a National Monument in Guyana. 2016 © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
The Church of Chonchi or Church of St. Charles Borromeo, Conchi, Chiloe Island, was made a National Monument of Chile in 1971.  The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of  architecture.  Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate.  Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions.  They are an excellent example of mestizo culture.  Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. 2005  © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
EVAW0535449.jpg
The Church of Chonchi or Church of St. Charles Borromeo, Conchi, Chiloe Island, was made a National Monument of Chile in 1971. The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of architecture. Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate. Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions. They are an excellent example of mestizo culture. Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. 2005 © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
The recently-restored wooden Church of Vilupulli.  The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of  architecture.  Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate.  Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions.  They are an excellent example of mestizo culture.  Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. 2005  © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
EVAW0535450.jpg
The recently-restored wooden Church of Vilupulli. The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of architecture. Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate. Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions. They are an excellent example of mestizo culture. Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. 2005 © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of  architecture.  Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate.  Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions.  They are an excellent example of mestizo culture.  Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000.  The Church of San Francisco, Iglesia de San Francisco, located on one side of the Plaza de Armas of Castro, Chile, is the main Catholic church of Chiloé’s capital. It is  52m long and 27m wide. The dome above the church's presbytery is 32m high and the  towers are 42m tall. The church is also known as the Iglesia Apóstol Santiago or St James Church.  The church was declared a Chilean National Monument in 1979.  Unlike the other churches of Chiloé, the Church of San Francisco is Neo-Gothic style.  In the structure, the carpenters used wood from the area, however the facade, roof and exterior lining are covered with sheets of galvanized iron. The facade is often painted with bright colors.  It was rebuilt from 1910-1912 Inside the church is an image of the Archangel Michael victorious over Satan. 2005  © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
EVAW0535445.jpg
The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of architecture. Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate. Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions. They are an excellent example of mestizo culture. Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. The Church of San Francisco, Iglesia de San Francisco, located on one side of the Plaza de Armas of Castro, Chile, is the main Catholic church of Chiloé’s capital. It is 52m long and 27m wide. The dome above the church's presbytery is 32m high and the towers are 42m tall. The church is also known as the Iglesia Apóstol Santiago or St James Church. The church was declared a Chilean National Monument in 1979. Unlike the other churches of Chiloé, the Church of San Francisco is Neo-Gothic style. In the structure, the carpenters used wood from the area, however the facade, roof and exterior lining are covered with sheets of galvanized iron. The facade is often painted with bright colors. It was rebuilt from 1910-1912
Inside the church is an image of the Archangel Michael victorious over Satan. 2005 © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
Church of Our Lady of Grace of Nercón, or Iglesia de Señora de Gracia de Nercón, Chiloe Island, Chile was made a National Monument of Chile in 1984.  It is considered as one of the best examples of Chiloe Chilota architecture. The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of  architecture.  Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate.  Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions.  They are an excellent example of mestizo culture.  Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. 2005  © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
EVAW0535444.jpg
Church of Our Lady of Grace of Nercón, or Iglesia de Señora de Gracia de Nercón, Chiloe Island, Chile was made a National Monument of Chile in 1984. It is considered as one of the best examples of Chiloe Chilota architecture. The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of architecture. Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate. Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions. They are an excellent example of mestizo culture. Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. 2005 © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
Church of Our Lady of Grace of Nercón, or Iglesia de Señora de Gracia de Nercón, Chiloe Island, Chile was made a National Monument of Chile in 1984.  It is considered as one of the best examples of Chiloe Chilota architecture. The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of  architecture.  Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate.  Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions.  They are an excellent example of mestizo culture.  Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. 2005  © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
EVAW0535442.jpg
Church of Our Lady of Grace of Nercón, or Iglesia de Señora de Gracia de Nercón, Chiloe Island, Chile was made a National Monument of Chile in 1984. It is considered as one of the best examples of Chiloe Chilota architecture. The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of architecture. Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate. Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions. They are an excellent example of mestizo culture. Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. 2005 © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
Church of Our Lady of Grace of Nercón, or Iglesia de Señora de Gracia de Nercón, Chiloe Island, Chile was made a National Monument of Chile in 1984.  It is considered as one of the best examples of Chiloe Chilota architecture. The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of  architecture.  Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate.  Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions.  They are an excellent example of mestizo culture.  Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. 2005  © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works
EVAW0535443.jpg
Church of Our Lady of Grace of Nercón, or Iglesia de Señora de Gracia de Nercón, Chiloe Island, Chile was made a National Monument of Chile in 1984. It is considered as one of the best examples of Chiloe Chilota architecture. The wooden churches of the Chiloé Archipelago in the Los Lagos Region, Region X, Chiloe Province, Chile are examples of the Chilota style of architecture. Unlike classical Spanish colonial stone architecture, the churches of Chiloé are made entirely in native timber with extensive use of wood shingles. The churches were built from native materials to resist Chiloé Archipelago's humid and rainy oceanic climate. Built in the 18th and 19th centuries when the Chiloé Archipelago was still a possession of Spain, the churches are a mix of European Jesuit culture and local native skills and traditions. They are an excellent example of mestizo culture. Sixteen of the churches of Chiloé were designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2000. 2005 © Jon G. Fuller / V&W / The Image Works

best live chat