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Entire Online Archive: "natural and history": 2000 results 

A total of 40087 files matched your search. The oldest files are not included in the result set.

A woman goes off to work in  the early morning sunshine, at  atmospheric scene in Church  Street, Blackburn,  Lanacashire, England. Date: 1950s  ©Mary Evans / The Image Works
EMEP0174866.jpg
A woman goes off to work in the early morning sunshine, at atmospheric scene in Church Street, Blackburn, Lanacashire, England. Date: 1950s ©Mary Evans / The Image Works
Italy: Temple of the Dioscuri (in Greek mythology, the twin brothers Castor and Pollux), originally built mid-5th century BCE, Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.  Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.  Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0035728.jpg
Italy: Temple of the Dioscuri (in Greek mythology, the twin brothers Castor and Pollux), originally built mid-5th century BCE, Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.

Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.

Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Temple of the Dioscuri (in Greek mythology, the twin brothers Castor and Pollux), originally built mid-5th century BCE, Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.  Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.  Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0035727.jpg
Italy: Temple of the Dioscuri (in Greek mythology, the twin brothers Castor and Pollux), originally built mid-5th century BCE, Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.

Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.

Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Temple of the Dioscuri (in Greek mythology, the twin brothers Castor and Pollux), originally built mid-5th century BCE, Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.  Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.  Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0035724.jpg
Italy: Temple of the Dioscuri (in Greek mythology, the twin brothers Castor and Pollux), originally built mid-5th century BCE, Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.

Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.

Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Temple of the Dioscuri (in Greek mythology, the twin brothers Castor and Pollux), originally built mid-5th century BCE, Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.  Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.  Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0035726.jpg
Italy: Temple of the Dioscuri (in Greek mythology, the twin brothers Castor and Pollux), originally built mid-5th century BCE, Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.

Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.

Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: A fallen atlas (architectural support in the form of a man) at the Temple of Olympian Zeus (5th century BCE), Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.  Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.  Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: A fallen atlas (architectural support in the form of a man) at the Temple of Olympian Zeus (5th century BCE), Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.

Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.

Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: A fallen atlas (architectural support in the form of a man) at the Temple of Olympian Zeus (5th century BCE), Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.  Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.  Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0035723.jpg
Italy: A fallen atlas (architectural support in the form of a man) at the Temple of Olympian Zeus (5th century BCE), Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.

Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.

Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: A fallen atlas (architectural support in the form of a man) at the Temple of Olympian Zeus (5th century BCE), Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.  Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.  Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: A fallen atlas (architectural support in the form of a man) at the Temple of Olympian Zeus (5th century BCE), Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.

Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.

Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Temple of Heracles (late 6th century BCE), Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.  Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.  Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Temple of Heracles (late 6th century BCE), Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.

Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.

Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Temple of Heracles (late 6th century BCE), Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.  Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.  Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0035718.jpg
Italy: Temple of Heracles (late 6th century BCE), Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.

Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.

Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Temple of Heracles (late 6th century BCE), Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.  Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.  Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0035713.jpg
Italy: Temple of Heracles (late 6th century BCE), Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.

Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.

Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Temple of Heracles (late 6th century BCE), Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.  Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.  Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0035714.jpg
Italy: Temple of Heracles (late 6th century BCE), Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.

Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.

Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Temple of Concordia (built c. 440 - 430 BCE), Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.  Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.  Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0035711.jpg
Italy: Temple of Concordia (built c. 440 - 430 BCE), Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.

Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.

Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Icarus fallen to earth (bronze statue by Polish sculptor Igor Mitoraj, 1944 - 2014) lies in front of the Temple of Concordia  (c. 440 - 430 BCE), Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.  Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.  Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0035712.jpg
Italy: Icarus fallen to earth (bronze statue by Polish sculptor Igor Mitoraj, 1944 - 2014) lies in front of the Temple of Concordia (c. 440 - 430 BCE), Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.

Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.

Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Temple of Concordia (built c. 440 - 430 BCE), Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.  Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.  Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0035710.jpg
Italy: Temple of Concordia (built c. 440 - 430 BCE), Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.

Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.

Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Temple of Hera Lacinia (Temple of Juno) built c. 450 BCE, Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.  Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.  Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Temple of Hera Lacinia (Temple of Juno) built c. 450 BCE, Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.

Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.

Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Temple of Concordia (built c. 440 - 430 BCE), Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.  Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.  Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Temple of Concordia (built c. 440 - 430 BCE), Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.

Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.

Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Temple of Concordia (built c. 440 - 430 BCE), Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.  Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.  Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Temple of Concordia (built c. 440 - 430 BCE), Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.

Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.

Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Temple of Hera Lacinia (Temple of Juno) built c. 450 BCE, Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.  Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.  Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0035704.jpg
Italy: Temple of Hera Lacinia (Temple of Juno) built c. 450 BCE, Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.

Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.

Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Temple of Hera Lacinia (Temple of Juno) built c. 450 BCE, Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.  Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.  Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0035703.jpg
Italy: Temple of Hera Lacinia (Temple of Juno) built c. 450 BCE, Valley of the Temples (Valle dei Templi), Agrigento, Sicily - Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582–580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it 'Akragas'.

Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus.

Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Germany / France: Icon of Charles III (839-888), 6th Holy Roman emperor, from the book Icones imperatorvm romanorvm, ex priscis numismatibus ad viuum delineatae, & breui narratione historica, 1645 - Charles III (839-888), more commonly known as Charles the Fat, was the youngest son of Louis the German, King of East Francia, and great-grandson of Emperor Charlemagne. Following the division of East Francia among Louis' sons, Charles inherited Alamannia in 876, but soon inherited the Kingdom of Italy in 876 after his older brother Carloman of Bavaria abdicated.  Charles was eventually crowned as Holy Roman emperor in 881, and succeeded his brother Louis the Younger as king of Saxony and Bavaria a year later, reuniting the Kingdom of East Francia. He was forced to deal with the Great Heathen Army, a large force of Vikings that had been repelled from Britain by King Alfred the Great in 878, something he dealt with through assassination and bribery. After his cousin Carloman II died in 884, Charles also inherited all of West Francia, reuniting the Carolingian Empire under his reign.  Charles' reunited kingdom did not last long, as a coup in November 887 led by his nephew Arnulf of Carinthia eventually deposed him. He was forced to retire, and soon died of natural causes a year later in January 888, only weeks after his deposition. The Carolingian Empire soon fell apart after his death, split into five successor kingdoms.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Germany / France: Icon of Charles III (839-888), 6th Holy Roman emperor, from the book Icones imperatorvm romanorvm, ex priscis numismatibus ad viuum delineatae, & breui narratione historica, 1645 - Charles III (839-888), more commonly known as Charles the Fat, was the youngest son of Louis the German, King of East Francia, and great-grandson of Emperor Charlemagne. Following the division of East Francia among Louis' sons, Charles inherited Alamannia in 876, but soon inherited the Kingdom of Italy in 876 after his older brother Carloman of Bavaria abdicated.

Charles was eventually crowned as Holy Roman emperor in 881, and succeeded his brother Louis the Younger as king of Saxony and Bavaria a year later, reuniting the Kingdom of East Francia. He was forced to deal with the Great Heathen Army, a large force of Vikings that had been repelled from Britain by King Alfred the Great in 878, something he dealt with through assassination and bribery. After his cousin Carloman II died in 884, Charles also inherited all of West Francia, reuniting the Carolingian Empire under his reign.

Charles' reunited kingdom did not last long, as a coup in November 887 led by his nephew Arnulf of Carinthia eventually deposed him. He was forced to retire, and soon died of natural causes a year later in January 888, only weeks after his deposition. The Carolingian Empire soon fell apart after his death, split into five successor kingdoms. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Germany / France: Illustration of Charles III (839-888), 6th Holy Roman emperor, from the book Romanorvm imperatorvm effigies: elogijs ex diuersis scriptoribus per Thomam Treteru S. Mariae Transtyberim canonicum collectis, 1583 - Charles III (839-888), more commonly known as Charles the Fat, was the youngest son of Louis the German, King of East Francia, and great-grandson of Emperor Charlemagne. Following the division of East Francia among Louis' sons, Charles inherited Alamannia in 876, but soon inherited the Kingdom of Italy in 876 after his older brother Carloman of Bavaria abdicated.  Charles was eventually crowned as Holy Roman emperor in 881, and succeeded his brother Louis the Younger as king of Saxony and Bavaria a year later, reuniting the Kingdom of East Francia. He was forced to deal with the Great Heathen Army, a large force of Vikings that had been repelled from Britain by King Alfred the Great in 878, something he dealt with through assassination and bribery. After his cousin Carloman II died in 884, Charles also inherited all of West Francia, reuniting the Carolingian Empire under his reign.  Charles' reunited kingdom did not last long, as a coup in November 887 led by his nephew Arnulf of Carinthia eventually deposed him. He was forced to retire, and soon died of natural causes a year later in January 888, only weeks after his deposition. The Carolingian Empire soon fell apart after his death, split into five successor kingdoms.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0035530.jpg
Germany / France: Illustration of Charles III (839-888), 6th Holy Roman emperor, from the book Romanorvm imperatorvm effigies: elogijs ex diuersis scriptoribus per Thomam Treteru S. Mariae Transtyberim canonicum collectis, 1583 - Charles III (839-888), more commonly known as Charles the Fat, was the youngest son of Louis the German, King of East Francia, and great-grandson of Emperor Charlemagne. Following the division of East Francia among Louis' sons, Charles inherited Alamannia in 876, but soon inherited the Kingdom of Italy in 876 after his older brother Carloman of Bavaria abdicated.

Charles was eventually crowned as Holy Roman emperor in 881, and succeeded his brother Louis the Younger as king of Saxony and Bavaria a year later, reuniting the Kingdom of East Francia. He was forced to deal with the Great Heathen Army, a large force of Vikings that had been repelled from Britain by King Alfred the Great in 878, something he dealt with through assassination and bribery. After his cousin Carloman II died in 884, Charles also inherited all of West Francia, reuniting the Carolingian Empire under his reign.

Charles' reunited kingdom did not last long, as a coup in November 887 led by his nephew Arnulf of Carinthia eventually deposed him. He was forced to retire, and soon died of natural causes a year later in January 888, only weeks after his deposition. The Carolingian Empire soon fell apart after his death, split into five successor kingdoms. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
True indigo, Indigofera tinctoria Handcolored copperplate engraving of a botanical illustration from G. T. Wilhelm's Unterhaltungen aus der Naturgeschichte (Encyclopedia of Natural History) Vienna 1816. Gottlieb Tobias Wilhelm (1758-1811) was a Bavarian clergyman and naturalist in Augsburg where the first edition was published.  © SSPL / Florilegius / The Image Works
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True indigo, Indigofera tinctoria Handcolored copperplate engraving of a botanical illustration from G. T. Wilhelm's Unterhaltungen aus der Naturgeschichte (Encyclopedia of Natural History) Vienna 1816. Gottlieb Tobias Wilhelm (1758-1811) was a Bavarian clergyman and naturalist in Augsburg where the first edition was published. © SSPL / Florilegius / The Image Works
Rural area near Ordizia Guipúzcoa Province. Vasque Country. Spain 2017 ©Sergi Reboredo /V&W /The Image Works
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Rural area near Ordizia Guipúzcoa Province. Vasque Country. Spain 2017 ©Sergi Reboredo /V&W /The Image Works
Uros Island, Lake Titicaca, peru, South America. Some girls on the island of Los Uros located inside Lake Titicaca play with a volleyball. 2017 ©Sergi Reboredo /V&W /The Image Works
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Uros Island, Lake Titicaca, peru, South America. Some girls on the island of Los Uros located inside Lake Titicaca play with a volleyball. 2017 ©Sergi Reboredo /V&W /The Image Works

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