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Entire Online Archive: "religion": 2000 results 

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Tibet. Elderly Buddhist monk at Tashilhunpo Monastery outside Xigatse town.  Monastery founded in 1447
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Tibet. Elderly Buddhist monk at Tashilhunpo Monastery outside Xigatse town. Monastery founded in 1447
18th Century European Jewish family, prepare to celebrate the beginning of the Sabbath c1868. ©World History Archive / TopFoto / The Image Works
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18th Century European Jewish family, prepare to celebrate the beginning of the Sabbath c1868.
©World History Archive / TopFoto / The Image Works
Sabbath in Galicia. Jew in prayer in front of layed table. Photograph, about 1900.  ©IMAGNO / Sammlung Hubmann / The Image Works
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Sabbath in Galicia. Jew in prayer in front of layed table. Photograph, about 1900. ©IMAGNO / Sammlung Hubmann / The Image Works
Sabbath in Galicia: Jew sitting at a dining table. Photograph around 1900.  ©IMAGNO / Sammlung Hubmann / The Image Works
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Sabbath in Galicia: Jew sitting at a dining table. Photograph around 1900. ©IMAGNO / Sammlung Hubmann / The Image Works
India: Pilgrims visiting the holy Jain Palitana temples (11th to 16th Century CE) in the Shatrunjaya Hills, Gujarat (2004) - The Jain's sacred site of Shatrunjaya contains hundreds of Palitana temples built mostly between the 11th Century and 16th Century CE. The Shatrunjaya Hills were sanctified when Rishabha, the first tirthankara (omniscient Teaching God) of Jainism, gave his first sermon in the temple on the hill top. The ancient history of the hills is also traced to Pundarika Swami, a chief Ganadhara and grandson of Rishabha, who attained salvation here. His shrine located opposite to the main Adinath temple, built by his son Bharata, is also worshiped by pilgrims.  ©Rainer Krack/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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India: Pilgrims visiting the holy Jain Palitana temples (11th to 16th Century CE) in the Shatrunjaya Hills, Gujarat (2004) - The Jain's sacred site of Shatrunjaya contains hundreds of Palitana temples built mostly between the 11th Century and 16th Century CE. The Shatrunjaya Hills were sanctified when Rishabha, the first tirthankara (omniscient Teaching God) of Jainism, gave his first sermon in the temple on the hill top. The ancient history of the hills is also traced to Pundarika Swami, a chief Ganadhara and grandson of Rishabha, who attained salvation here. His shrine located opposite to the main Adinath temple, built by his son Bharata, is also worshiped by pilgrims. ©Rainer Krack/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
India: Pilgrims visiting the holy Jain Palitana temples (11th to 16th Century CE) in the Shatrunjaya Hills, Gujarat (2004) - The Jain's sacred site of Shatrunjaya contains hundreds of Palitana temples built mostly between the 11th Century and 16th Century CE. The Shatrunjaya Hills were sanctified when Rishabha, the first tirthankara (omniscient Teaching God) of Jainism, gave his first sermon in the temple on the hill top. The ancient history of the hills is also traced to Pundarika Swami, a chief Ganadhara and grandson of Rishabha, who attained salvation here. His shrine located opposite to the main Adinath temple, built by his son Bharata, is also worshiped by pilgrims.  ©Rainer Krack/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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India: Pilgrims visiting the holy Jain Palitana temples (11th to 16th Century CE) in the Shatrunjaya Hills, Gujarat (2004) - The Jain's sacred site of Shatrunjaya contains hundreds of Palitana temples built mostly between the 11th Century and 16th Century CE. The Shatrunjaya Hills were sanctified when Rishabha, the first tirthankara (omniscient Teaching God) of Jainism, gave his first sermon in the temple on the hill top. The ancient history of the hills is also traced to Pundarika Swami, a chief Ganadhara and grandson of Rishabha, who attained salvation here. His shrine located opposite to the main Adinath temple, built by his son Bharata, is also worshiped by pilgrims. ©Rainer Krack/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
India: Coconuts, fruits and sweets are used as offerings in the holy Jain Palitana temples (11th to 16th Century CE) in the Shatrunjaya Hills, Gujarat (2004) - The Jain's sacred site of Shatrunjaya contains hundreds of Palitana temples built mostly between the 11th Century and 16th Century CE. The Shatrunjaya Hills were sanctified when Rishabha, the first tirthankara (omniscient Teaching God) of Jainism, gave his first sermon in the temple on the hill top. The ancient history of the hills is also traced to Pundarika Swami, a chief Ganadhara and grandson of Rishabha, who attained salvation here. His shrine located opposite to the main Adinath temple, built by his son Bharata, is also worshiped by pilgrims.  ©Chaweewan Chuchuay/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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India: Coconuts, fruits and sweets are used as offerings in the holy Jain Palitana temples (11th to 16th Century CE) in the Shatrunjaya Hills, Gujarat (2004) - The Jain's sacred site of Shatrunjaya contains hundreds of Palitana temples built mostly between the 11th Century and 16th Century CE. The Shatrunjaya Hills were sanctified when Rishabha, the first tirthankara (omniscient Teaching God) of Jainism, gave his first sermon in the temple on the hill top. The ancient history of the hills is also traced to Pundarika Swami, a chief Ganadhara and grandson of Rishabha, who attained salvation here. His shrine located opposite to the main Adinath temple, built by his son Bharata, is also worshiped by pilgrims. ©Chaweewan Chuchuay/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
India: Pilgrims at the Shri Adishwara Temple, one of the holy Jain Palitana temples (11th to 16th Century CE) in the Shatrunjaya Hills, Gujarat (2004) - The Jain's sacred site of Shatrunjaya contains hundreds of Palitana temples built mostly between the 11th Century and 16th Century CE. The Shatrunjaya Hills were sanctified when Rishabha, the first tirthankara (omniscient Teaching God) of Jainism, gave his first sermon in the temple on the hill top. The ancient history of the hills is also traced to Pundarika Swami, a chief Ganadhara and grandson of Rishabha, who attained salvation here. His shrine located opposite to the main Adinath temple, built by his son Bharata, is also worshiped by pilgrims.  ©Rainer Krack/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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India: Pilgrims at the Shri Adishwara Temple, one of the holy Jain Palitana temples (11th to 16th Century CE) in the Shatrunjaya Hills, Gujarat (2004) - The Jain's sacred site of Shatrunjaya contains hundreds of Palitana temples built mostly between the 11th Century and 16th Century CE. The Shatrunjaya Hills were sanctified when Rishabha, the first tirthankara (omniscient Teaching God) of Jainism, gave his first sermon in the temple on the hill top. The ancient history of the hills is also traced to Pundarika Swami, a chief Ganadhara and grandson of Rishabha, who attained salvation here. His shrine located opposite to the main Adinath temple, built by his son Bharata, is also worshiped by pilgrims. ©Rainer Krack/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
India: Pilgrims at the Shri Adishwara Temple, one of the holy Jain Palitana temples (11th to 16th Century CE) in the Shatrunjaya Hills, Gujarat (2004) - The Jain's sacred site of Shatrunjaya contains hundreds of Palitana temples built mostly between the 11th Century and 16th Century CE. The Shatrunjaya Hills were sanctified when Rishabha, the first tirthankara (omniscient Teaching God) of Jainism, gave his first sermon in the temple on the hill top. The ancient history of the hills is also traced to Pundarika Swami, a chief Ganadhara and grandson of Rishabha, who attained salvation here. His shrine located opposite to the main Adinath temple, built by his son Bharata, is also worshiped by pilgrims.  ©Rainer Krack/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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India: Pilgrims at the Shri Adishwara Temple, one of the holy Jain Palitana temples (11th to 16th Century CE) in the Shatrunjaya Hills, Gujarat (2004) - The Jain's sacred site of Shatrunjaya contains hundreds of Palitana temples built mostly between the 11th Century and 16th Century CE. The Shatrunjaya Hills were sanctified when Rishabha, the first tirthankara (omniscient Teaching God) of Jainism, gave his first sermon in the temple on the hill top. The ancient history of the hills is also traced to Pundarika Swami, a chief Ganadhara and grandson of Rishabha, who attained salvation here. His shrine located opposite to the main Adinath temple, built by his son Bharata, is also worshiped by pilgrims. ©Rainer Krack/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
India: Pilgrims at the Shri Adishwara Temple, one of the holy Jain Palitana temples (11th to 16th Century CE) in the Shatrunjaya Hills, Gujarat (2004) - The Jain's sacred site of Shatrunjaya contains hundreds of Palitana temples built mostly between the 11th Century and 16th Century CE. The Shatrunjaya Hills were sanctified when Rishabha, the first tirthankara (omniscient Teaching God) of Jainism, gave his first sermon in the temple on the hill top. The ancient history of the hills is also traced to Pundarika Swami, a chief Ganadhara and grandson of Rishabha, who attained salvation here. His shrine located opposite to the main Adinath temple, built by his son Bharata, is also worshiped by pilgrims.  ©Chaweewan Chuchuay/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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India: Pilgrims at the Shri Adishwara Temple, one of the holy Jain Palitana temples (11th to 16th Century CE) in the Shatrunjaya Hills, Gujarat (2004) - The Jain's sacred site of Shatrunjaya contains hundreds of Palitana temples built mostly between the 11th Century and 16th Century CE. The Shatrunjaya Hills were sanctified when Rishabha, the first tirthankara (omniscient Teaching God) of Jainism, gave his first sermon in the temple on the hill top. The ancient history of the hills is also traced to Pundarika Swami, a chief Ganadhara and grandson of Rishabha, who attained salvation here. His shrine located opposite to the main Adinath temple, built by his son Bharata, is also worshiped by pilgrims. ©Chaweewan Chuchuay/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Spain: Medallion of Saint Teresa of Ávila (Santa Teresa, 1515 - 1582), Spanish Carmelite nun and author, Plaza de España (Spain Square), Seville - Saint Teresa of Ávila, also called Saint Teresa of Jesus, baptized as Teresa Sánchez de Cepeda y Ahumada (28 March 1515 – 4 October 1582), was a prominent Spanish mystic, Roman Catholic saint, Carmelite nun, author, and theologian of contemplative life through mental prayer.  The Plaza de España is a plaza in the Parque de María Luisa (Maria Luisa Park), in Seville, Spain, built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929. It is a landmark example of the Regionalism Architecture, mixing elements of the Renaissance Revival and Moorish Revival (Neo-Mudéjar) styles of Spanish architecture.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Spain: Medallion of Saint Teresa of Ávila (Santa Teresa, 1515 - 1582), Spanish Carmelite nun and author, Plaza de España (Spain Square), Seville - Saint Teresa of Ávila, also called Saint Teresa of Jesus, baptized as Teresa Sánchez de Cepeda y Ahumada (28 March 1515 – 4 October 1582), was a prominent Spanish mystic, Roman Catholic saint, Carmelite nun, author, and theologian of contemplative life through mental prayer.

The Plaza de España is a plaza in the Parque de María Luisa (Maria Luisa Park), in Seville, Spain, built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929. It is a landmark example of the Regionalism Architecture, mixing elements of the Renaissance Revival and Moorish Revival (Neo-Mudéjar) styles of Spanish architecture. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Constantine the Great (272-337), 57th Roman emperor, and the Council of Nicea, with the burning of Arian books illustrated below. Drawing on vellum, c. 825 CE, Biblioteca Capitolare, Vercelli - Constantine I (272-337), also known as Constantine the Great and Saint Constantine, was the son of Emperor Constantius. His father sent him east to serve under Emperors Diocletian and Galerius, spending some time in the court of the latter. After his father died in 306 CE, Constantine was proclaimed his successor and emperor by his army at Eboracum (York).  He at first remained officially neutral in the efforts of Emperor Galerius to defeat the usurper Maxentius, but after Galerius' death, Constantine was dragged into the conflict. He eventually defeated Maxentius in 312 CE, and then fought against his erstwhile ally, Emperor Licinius, for sole control of both western and eastern portions of the Roman Empire. Licinius was defeated in 324 CE, and Constantine became emperor of a united empire.  Constantine enacted many reforms strengthening the empire, ending the tetrarchy system and restructuring government. He became the first emperor to claim conversion to Christianity, and he called the First Council of Nicaea in 325 CE, overseeing the profession of the Nicene Creed. He renamed Byzantium to Constantinople after himself, which would become the new capital. He died in 337 CE.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Constantine the Great (272-337), 57th Roman emperor, and the Council of Nicea, with the burning of Arian books illustrated below. Drawing on vellum, c. 825 CE, Biblioteca Capitolare, Vercelli - Constantine I (272-337), also known as Constantine the Great and Saint Constantine, was the son of Emperor Constantius. His father sent him east to serve under Emperors Diocletian and Galerius, spending some time in the court of the latter. After his father died in 306 CE, Constantine was proclaimed his successor and emperor by his army at Eboracum (York).

He at first remained officially neutral in the efforts of Emperor Galerius to defeat the usurper Maxentius, but after Galerius' death, Constantine was dragged into the conflict. He eventually defeated Maxentius in 312 CE, and then fought against his erstwhile ally, Emperor Licinius, for sole control of both western and eastern portions of the Roman Empire. Licinius was defeated in 324 CE, and Constantine became emperor of a united empire.

Constantine enacted many reforms strengthening the empire, ending the tetrarchy system and restructuring government. He became the first emperor to claim conversion to Christianity, and he called the First Council of Nicaea in 325 CE, overseeing the profession of the Nicene Creed. He renamed Byzantium to Constantinople after himself, which would become the new capital. He died in 337 CE. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Mosaics, Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Mosaics, Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Mosaics, Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Mosaics, Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Mosaics, Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Mosaics, Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Mosaics, Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Mosaics, Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Mosaics, Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Mosaics, Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Mosaics, Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Mosaics, Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Mosaics, Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Mosaics, Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Exterior mosaics, Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Exterior mosaics, Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Exterior mosaics, Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Exterior mosaics, Palatine Chapel (Capella Palatina), Palace of the Normans (Palazzo dei Normanni), Palermo, Sicily - The Palatine Chapel was the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Sicily. It was commissioned by Roger II of Sicily (1095 - 1154) in 1132 to be built upon an older chapel (now the crypt) constructed around 1080. It took eight years to build, receiving a royal charter the same year, with the mosaics being only partially finished by 1143. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works

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