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Entire Online Archive: "religion": 2000 results 

A total of 96433 files matched your search. The oldest files are not included in the result set.

Anti-Abortion protest outside the Planned Parenthood facility in Schencetady, New York, January, 1987.
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Anti-Abortion protest outside the Planned Parenthood facility in Schencetady, New York, January, 1987.
Anti-Abortion protest outside the Planned Parenthood facility in Schencetady, New York, January,  1987.
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Anti-Abortion protest outside the Planned Parenthood facility in Schencetady, New York, January, 1987.
Anti-Abortion protest outside the Planned Parenthood facility in Schencetady, New York, January,  1987.
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Anti-Abortion protest outside the Planned Parenthood facility in Schencetady, New York, January, 1987.
"Pray to end Abortion" protestors outside a Planned Parenthood facility in Schenectady, New York, January, 1987.
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"Pray to end Abortion" protestors outside a Planned Parenthood facility in Schenectady, New York, January, 1987.
The steeples of religion and capitalism, Saint Paul's Chapel/Trinity Church and the World Trade Center, lower Manhattan, NYC.
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The steeples of religion and capitalism, Saint Paul's Chapel/Trinity Church and the World Trade Center, lower Manhattan, NYC.
Kawaihae, Hawaii - Pu'ukohola Heiau National Historic Site. The heiau, or temple, was built in 1790-91 by Kamehameha the Great, who became the first king of all the Hawaiian islands. Two puloulou indicate that it is forbidden (kapu) to enter this area. Copyright © Jim West / The Image Works
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Kawaihae, Hawaii - Pu'ukohola Heiau National Historic Site. The heiau, or temple, was built in 1790-91 by Kamehameha the Great, who became the first king of all the Hawaiian islands. Two puloulou indicate that it is forbidden (kapu) to enter this area.
Copyright © Jim West / The Image Works
Kawaihae, Hawaii - Pu'ukohola Heiau National Historic Site. The heiau, or temple, was built in 1790-91 by Kamehameha the Great, who became the first king of all the Hawaiian islands. Two puloulou indicate that it is forbidden (kapu) to enter this area. Copyright © Jim West / The Image Works
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Kawaihae, Hawaii - Pu'ukohola Heiau National Historic Site. The heiau, or temple, was built in 1790-91 by Kamehameha the Great, who became the first king of all the Hawaiian islands. Two puloulou indicate that it is forbidden (kapu) to enter this area.
Copyright © Jim West / The Image Works
Kawaihae, Hawaii - Pu'ukohola Heiau National Historic Site. Two puloulou constitute an ancient "no trespassing" sign, indicating that it is forbidden (kapu) to enter this area. Copyright © Jim West / The Image Works
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Kawaihae, Hawaii - Pu'ukohola Heiau National Historic Site. Two puloulou constitute an ancient "no trespassing" sign, indicating that it is forbidden (kapu) to enter this area.
Copyright © Jim West / The Image Works
Woodstock Festival '69. Bethel, New York    Swami Satchitananda  ©Tom Miner / The Image Works
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Woodstock Festival '69. Bethel, New York Swami Satchitananda ©Tom Miner / The Image Works
4724. Israel: Dir Saman, Remains of an Byzantibe Monastery in Samaria 3573. Dor Excavations of the Helenistic Roman Port of the City Which Served as a Major Port Since the Times of King Solomon. ©akg-images / Bible Land Pictures / Zev Radovan / The Image Works
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4724. Israel: Dir Saman, Remains of an Byzantibe Monastery in Samaria 3573. Dor Excavations of the Helenistic Roman Port of the City Which Served as a Major Port Since the Times of King Solomon. ©akg-images / Bible Land Pictures / Zev Radovan / The Image Works
The figure pictured here, according to Greek mythology, is Apeliotes, god of the southeast wind, which was associated with good rain. Thus in art he was shown carrying fruit and draped in a cloth that concealed flowers or grain. Usually he was shown holding a ship's sternpost because when the wind blew form the southwest into Athens' port harbor of Piraeus, ships could not sail. Zephyrus was the god of the west wind. Zephyrus was the gentlest of the winds and considered a harbinger of springtime. He was pictured with flowers that indicated a mild light breeze. Eurus, or Euros, was the god of the east wind. The folds of his clothes suggested heavy clouds. The Greeks honored eight wind gods. The other four were Boreas (cold north wind), Kaikias (northeast wind), Notos (south wind), and Skiron (northwest wind). © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
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The figure pictured here, according to Greek mythology, is Apeliotes, god of the southeast wind, which was associated with good rain. Thus in art he was shown carrying fruit and draped in a cloth that concealed flowers or grain. Usually he was shown holding a ship's sternpost because when the wind blew form the southwest into Athens' port harbor of Piraeus, ships could not sail. Zephyrus was the god of the west wind. Zephyrus was the gentlest of the winds and considered a harbinger of springtime. He was pictured with flowers that indicated a mild light breeze. Eurus, or Euros, was the god of the east wind. The folds of his clothes suggested heavy clouds. The Greeks honored eight wind gods. The other four were Boreas (cold north wind), Kaikias (northeast wind), Notos (south wind), and Skiron (northwest wind). © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
The figure pictured here, according to Greek mythology, is Zephyrus was the god of the west wind. Zephyrus was the gentlest of the winds and considered a harbinger of springtime. He was pictured with flowers that indicated a mild light breeze. The Greeks honored eight wind gods. The others are: Lips, or Livos, the god of the southwest wind. Usually he was shown holding a ship's sternpost because when the wind blew form the southwest into Athens' port harbor of Piraeus, ships could not sail. Eurus, or Euros, was the god of the east wind. The folds of his clothes suggested heavy clouds. Apeliotes was the southeast wind, which was associated with good rain. Thus in art he was shown carrying fruit and draped in a cloth that concealed flowers or grain. The other four were Boreas (cold north wind), Kaikias (northeast wind), Notos (south wind), and Skiron (northwest wind). © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
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The figure pictured here, according to Greek mythology, is Zephyrus was the god of the west wind. Zephyrus was the gentlest of the winds and considered a harbinger of springtime. He was pictured with flowers that indicated a mild light breeze. The Greeks honored eight wind gods. The others are: Lips, or Livos, the god of the southwest wind. Usually he was shown holding a ship's sternpost because when the wind blew form the southwest into Athens' port harbor of Piraeus, ships could not sail. Eurus, or Euros, was the god of the east wind. The folds of his clothes suggested heavy clouds. Apeliotes was the southeast wind, which was associated with good rain. Thus in art he was shown carrying fruit and draped in a cloth that concealed flowers or grain. The other four were Boreas (cold north wind), Kaikias (northeast wind), Notos (south wind), and Skiron (northwest wind). © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
The figure pictured here, according to Greek mythology, is Lips, or Livos, s the god of the southwest wind. Usually he was shown holding a ship's sternpost because when the wind blew form the southwest into Athens' port harbor of Piraeus, ships could not sail. The Greeks honored eight wind gods. The others are: Zephyrus was the god of the west wind. Zephyrus was the gentlest of the winds and considered a harbinger of springtime. He was pictured with flowers that indicated a mild light breeze. Eurus, or Euros, was the god of the east wind. The folds of his clothes suggested heavy clouds. Apeliotes was the southeast wind, which was associated with good rain. Thus in art he was shown carrying fruit and draped in a cloth that concealed flowers or grain. The other four were Boreas (cold north wind), Kaikias (northeast wind), Notos (south wind), and Skiron (northwest wind).  © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
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The figure pictured here, according to Greek mythology, is Lips, or Livos, s the god of the southwest wind. Usually he was shown holding a ship's sternpost because when the wind blew form the southwest into Athens' port harbor of Piraeus, ships could not sail. The Greeks honored eight wind gods. The others are: Zephyrus was the god of the west wind. Zephyrus was the gentlest of the winds and considered a harbinger of springtime. He was pictured with flowers that indicated a mild light breeze. Eurus, or Euros, was the god of the east wind. The folds of his clothes suggested heavy clouds. Apeliotes was the southeast wind, which was associated with good rain. Thus in art he was shown carrying fruit and draped in a cloth that concealed flowers or grain. The other four were Boreas (cold north wind), Kaikias (northeast wind), Notos (south wind), and Skiron (northwest wind). © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
The figure pictured here, according to Greek mythology, is Eurus, or Euros, the god of the east wind. The folds of his clothes suggested heavy clouds. The others are: Lips, or Livos, the god of the southwest wind. Usually he was shown holding a ship's sternpost because when the wind blew form the southwest into Athens' port harbor of Piraeus, ships could not sail. Zephyrus was the god of the west wind. Zephyrus was the gentlest of the winds and considered a harbinger of springtime. He was pictured with flowers that indicated a mild light breeze. The Greeks honored eight wind gods. Apeliotes was the southeast wind, which was associated with good rain. Thus in art he was shown carrying fruit and draped in a cloth that concealed flowers or grain. The other four were Boreas (cold north wind), Kaikias (northeast wind), Notos (south wind), and Skiron (northwest wind). © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557841.jpg
The figure pictured here, according to Greek mythology, is Eurus, or Euros, the god of the east wind. The folds of his clothes suggested heavy clouds. The others are: Lips, or Livos, the god of the southwest wind. Usually he was shown holding a ship's sternpost because when the wind blew form the southwest into Athens' port harbor of Piraeus, ships could not sail. Zephyrus was the god of the west wind. Zephyrus was the gentlest of the winds and considered a harbinger of springtime. He was pictured with flowers that indicated a mild light breeze. The Greeks honored eight wind gods. Apeliotes was the southeast wind, which was associated with good rain. Thus in art he was shown carrying fruit and draped in a cloth that concealed flowers or grain. The other four were Boreas (cold north wind), Kaikias (northeast wind), Notos (south wind), and Skiron (northwest wind). © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Istanbul, Turkey Pedestrians walk past the Sultan Ahmed Mosque also known as the Blue Mosque.  ©Alex Farnsworth / The Image Works
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Istanbul, Turkey Pedestrians walk past the Sultan Ahmed Mosque also known as the Blue Mosque. ©Alex Farnsworth / The Image Works
Istanbul, Turkey Pedestrians walk by the Hagia Sophia Mosque.  ©Alex Farnsworth / The Image Works
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Istanbul, Turkey Pedestrians walk by the Hagia Sophia Mosque. ©Alex Farnsworth / The Image Works
TANZANIA  -  Sean Sprague photo 2018  Transfiguration Catholic church, Mabatini, Mwanza. Holy mass lead by Frs Lam Hua and John Eybel.    © 2018 Sean Sprague / The Image Works
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TANZANIA - Sean Sprague photo 2018

Transfiguration Catholic church, Mabatini, Mwanza. Holy mass lead by Frs Lam Hua and John Eybel.

© 2018 Sean Sprague / The Image Works
TANZANIA  -  Sean Sprague photo 2018  Transfiguration Catholic church, Mabatini, Mwanza. Holy mass lead by Frs Lam Hua and John Eybel.    © 2018 Sean Sprague / The Image Works
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TANZANIA - Sean Sprague photo 2018

Transfiguration Catholic church, Mabatini, Mwanza. Holy mass lead by Frs Lam Hua and John Eybel.

© 2018 Sean Sprague / The Image Works
TANZANIA  -  Sean Sprague photo 2018  Small Christian Community gathering at Mabatini, Mwanza.    © 2018 Sean Sprague / The Image Works
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TANZANIA - Sean Sprague photo 2018

Small Christian Community gathering at Mabatini, Mwanza.

© 2018 Sean Sprague / The Image Works
TANZANIA  -  Sean Sprague photo 2018  Small Christian Community gathering at Mabatini, Mwanza.    © 2018 Sean Sprague / The Image Works
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TANZANIA - Sean Sprague photo 2018

Small Christian Community gathering at Mabatini, Mwanza.

© 2018 Sean Sprague / The Image Works
TANZANIA  -  Sean Sprague photo 2018  Small Christian Community gathering at Mabatini, Mwanza.    © 2018 Sean Sprague / The Image Works
ESPA0557497.jpg
TANZANIA - Sean Sprague photo 2018

Small Christian Community gathering at Mabatini, Mwanza.

© 2018 Sean Sprague / The Image Works
TANZANIA  -  Sean Sprague photo 2018  Small Christian Community gathering at Mabatini, Mwanza.    © 2018 Sean Sprague / The Image Works
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TANZANIA - Sean Sprague photo 2018

Small Christian Community gathering at Mabatini, Mwanza.

© 2018 Sean Sprague / The Image Works
TANZANIA  -  Sean Sprague photo 2018  Small Christian Community gathering at Mabatini, Mwanza.    © 2018 Sean Sprague / The Image Works
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TANZANIA - Sean Sprague photo 2018

Small Christian Community gathering at Mabatini, Mwanza.

© 2018 Sean Sprague / The Image Works
TANZANIA  -  Sean Sprague photo 2018  Small Christian Community gathering at Mabatini, Mwanza.    © 2018 Sean Sprague / The Image Works
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TANZANIA - Sean Sprague photo 2018

Small Christian Community gathering at Mabatini, Mwanza.

© 2018 Sean Sprague / The Image Works
TANZANIA  -  photo by Sean Sprague 2018  Bukundi, Shinyanga. Sunday mass in the Catholic church with Fr Ed Schoellmann MM.    © 2018 Sean Sprague / The Image Works
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TANZANIA - photo by Sean Sprague 2018

Bukundi, Shinyanga. Sunday mass in the Catholic church with Fr Ed Schoellmann MM.

© 2018 Sean Sprague / The Image Works

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