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Entire Online Archive: "science and technology": 2000 results 

A total of 32854 files matched your search. The oldest files are not included in the result set.

Fort Collins, Colorado - Amy Gurza, a biological science technician, looks for seeds stored at 0 degrees F in the freezer at the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation. The lab is part of the Department of Agriculture. August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
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Fort Collins, Colorado - Amy Gurza, a biological science technician, looks for seeds stored at 0 degrees F in the freezer at the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation. The lab is part of the Department of Agriculture.
August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
Fort Collins, Colorado - Amy Gurza, a biological science technician, inspects the contents of a tank of liquid nitrogen that stores seeds and other germplasm at -320 degrees F at the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation. The lab is part of the Department of Agriculture. August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
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Fort Collins, Colorado - Amy Gurza, a biological science technician, inspects the contents of a tank of liquid nitrogen that stores seeds and other germplasm at -320 degrees F at the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation. The lab is part of the Department of Agriculture.
August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
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Fort Collins, Colorado - Amy Gurza, a biological science technician, opens a tank of liquid nitrogen that stores seeds and other germplasm at -320 degrees F at the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation. The lab is part of the Department of Agriculture. August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
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Fort Collins, Colorado - Amy Gurza, a biological science technician, opens a tank of liquid nitrogen that stores seeds and other germplasm at -320 degrees F at the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation. The lab is part of the Department of Agriculture.
August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
Fort Collins, Colorado - Amy Gurza, a biological science technician, inspects the contents of a tank of liquid nitrogen that stores seeds and other germplasm at -320 degrees F at the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation. The lab is part of the Department of Agriculture. August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
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Fort Collins, Colorado - Amy Gurza, a biological science technician, inspects the contents of a tank of liquid nitrogen that stores seeds and other germplasm at -320 degrees F at the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation. The lab is part of the Department of Agriculture.
August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
Fort Collins, Colorado - Amy Gurza, a biological science technician, inspects the contents of a tank of liquid nitrogen that stores seeds and other germplasm at -320 degrees F at the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation. The lab is part of the Department of Agriculture. August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
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Fort Collins, Colorado - Amy Gurza, a biological science technician, inspects the contents of a tank of liquid nitrogen that stores seeds and other germplasm at -320 degrees F at the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation. The lab is part of the Department of Agriculture.
August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
Fort Collins, Colorado - Tanks of liquid nitrogen store semen from cows and other animals at -320 degrees F at the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation. The lab is part of the Department of Agriculture. Beth Krehbiel (right) a graduate student at Colorado State University, and animal geneticist Harvey Blackburn examine the contents of one cyro tank. Blackburn enables a clear view of the contents by vacuuming escaping nitrogen vapor produced as the liquid nitrogen boils. August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
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Fort Collins, Colorado - Tanks of liquid nitrogen store semen from cows and other animals at -320 degrees F at the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation. The lab is part of the Department of Agriculture. Beth Krehbiel (right) a graduate student at Colorado State University, and animal geneticist Harvey Blackburn examine the contents of one cyro tank. Blackburn enables a clear view of the contents by vacuuming escaping nitrogen vapor produced as the liquid nitrogen boils.
August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
Fort Collins, Colorado - Tanks of liquid nitrogen store semen from cows and other animals at -320 degrees F at the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation. The lab is part of the Department of Agriculture. Beth Krehbiel (left) a graduate student at Colorado State University, and animal geneticist Harvey Blackburn open a cyro tank. As the liquid nitrogen inside boils, Blackburn will vacuum the escaping vapor to enable a clear view of the contents. August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
EWST0546031.jpg
Fort Collins, Colorado - Tanks of liquid nitrogen store semen from cows and other animals at -320 degrees F at the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation. The lab is part of the Department of Agriculture. Beth Krehbiel (left) a graduate student at Colorado State University, and animal geneticist Harvey Blackburn open a cyro tank. As the liquid nitrogen inside boils, Blackburn will vacuum the escaping vapor to enable a clear view of the contents.
August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
Fort Collins, Colorado - Scott Spiller, a biological lab technician, studies the viability of boar sperm that, a few minutes earlier, had been frozen. He is working at the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation, which stores germplasm from plants and animals. The lab is part of the Department of Agriculture. August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
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Fort Collins, Colorado - Scott Spiller, a biological lab technician, studies the viability of boar sperm that, a few minutes earlier, had been frozen. He is working at the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation, which stores germplasm from plants and animals. The lab is part of the Department of Agriculture.
August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
Fort Collins, Colorado - Tanks of liquid nitrogen store semen from cows and other animals at -320 degrees F at the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation. The lab is part of the Department of Agriculture. The hose enables a clear view of the contents by vacuuming the nitrogen vapor produced as the liquid nitrogen boils. August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
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Fort Collins, Colorado - Tanks of liquid nitrogen store semen from cows and other animals at -320 degrees F at the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation. The lab is part of the Department of Agriculture. The hose enables a clear view of the contents by vacuuming the nitrogen vapor produced as the liquid nitrogen boils.
August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
Fort Collins, Colorado - Tanks of liquid nitrogen store semen from cows and other animals at -320 degrees F at the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation. The lab is part of the Department of Agriculture. August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
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Fort Collins, Colorado - Tanks of liquid nitrogen store semen from cows and other animals at -320 degrees F at the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation. The lab is part of the Department of Agriculture.
August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
Fort Collins, Colorado - The National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation, a unit of the Department of Agriculture. Bradford Hall, a biological science technician, propagates wild potatoes, part of research into storage strategies. August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
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Fort Collins, Colorado - The National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation, a unit of the Department of Agriculture. Bradford Hall, a biological science technician, propagates wild potatoes, part of research into storage strategies.
August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
Fort Collins, Colorado - The National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation, a unit of the Department of Agriculture. Sue Varela, a biological lab technician, examines tobacco seeds to see why they did not germinate. August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
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Fort Collins, Colorado - The National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation, a unit of the Department of Agriculture. Sue Varela, a biological lab technician, examines tobacco seeds to see why they did not germinate.
August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
Fort Collins, Colorado - The National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation, a unit of the Department of Agriculture. Annette Miller, a seed technician, assesses the viability of buckwheat (Erigonum heracleoides). August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
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Fort Collins, Colorado - The National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation, a unit of the Department of Agriculture. Annette Miller, a seed technician, assesses the viability of buckwheat (Erigonum heracleoides).
August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
Fort Collins, Colorado - The National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation, a unit of the Department of Agriculture. Ryan Lynch, a research assistant, examines germinated fern spores that had been frozen for 10 years to see how many survived. August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
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Fort Collins, Colorado - The National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation, a unit of the Department of Agriculture. Ryan Lynch, a research assistant, examines germinated fern spores that had been frozen for 10 years to see how many survived.
August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
Fort Collins, Colorado - The National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation, a unit of the Department of Agriculture. Wild potatoes in test tubes, part of research to determine the best storage strategy. August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
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Fort Collins, Colorado - The National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation, a unit of the Department of Agriculture. Wild potatoes in test tubes, part of research to determine the best storage strategy.
August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
Fort Collins, Colorado - The National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation, a unit of the Department of Agriculture. Heather Omerigic, a student intern from Colorado State University, studies pepper seeds that have been stored since 1988. She counts 50 seeds and will then see how many germinate. August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
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Fort Collins, Colorado - The National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation, a unit of the Department of Agriculture. Heather Omerigic, a student intern from Colorado State University, studies pepper seeds that have been stored since 1988. She counts 50 seeds and will then see how many germinate.
August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
Fort Collins, Colorado - The National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation, a unit of the Department of Agriculture. Research leader Dr. Christina Walters examines plants in the lab's walk-in germinator. Researchers will periodically try to germinate a sample of stored seeds to see what percentage respond. August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
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Fort Collins, Colorado - The National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation, a unit of the Department of Agriculture. Research leader Dr. Christina Walters examines plants in the lab's walk-in germinator. Researchers will periodically try to germinate a sample of stored seeds to see what percentage respond.
August , 2017 © Jim West / The Image Works
Largo, Florida, July 19, 2017:  Alakai's electrical engineer demonstrates how Alakai's PRIED, Portable Raman Improvised Explosive Detector, uses laser technology to analysize chemical residue from a safe distance.Alakai Defense Systems, Inc. of Largo is developing a promising technology that can detect fentanyl from a distance. The technology has already garnered attention from the likes of the Pinellas County Sheriff, who wants a tool that will help deputies avoid direct contact with the dangerous drug fentanyl, which can be poisonous to contact. ©Tampa Bay Times / Jim Damaske / The Image Works
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Largo, Florida, July 19, 2017: Alakai's electrical engineer demonstrates how Alakai's PRIED, Portable Raman Improvised Explosive Detector, uses laser technology to analysize chemical residue from a safe distance.Alakai Defense Systems, Inc. of Largo is developing a promising technology that can detect fentanyl from a distance. The technology has already garnered attention from the likes of the Pinellas County Sheriff, who wants a tool that will help deputies avoid direct contact with the dangerous drug fentanyl, which can be poisonous to contact. ©Tampa Bay Times / Jim Damaske / The Image Works
Gainesville, Florida, July 13, 2017:  A member of the University of Florida's Klee Lab holds a ripe tomato grown in one of the lab's three greenhouses. For about fifteen years, researchers at the University of Florida's Klee Lab have worked on understanding the chemical and genetic markers that determine the taste of tomatoes. Through genetic sequencing, biochemical analysis and panels of taste testing, Klee scientists have developed different kinds of tomato that attempt to manifest "perfect" taste.   ©Tampa Bay Times / Andres Leiva / The Image Works  Best quality if reproduced no larger than 1/2 page.
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Gainesville, Florida, July 13, 2017: A member of the University of Florida's Klee Lab holds a ripe tomato grown in one of the lab's three greenhouses. For about fifteen years, researchers at the University of Florida's Klee Lab have worked on understanding the chemical and genetic markers that determine the taste of tomatoes. Through genetic sequencing, biochemical analysis and panels of taste testing, Klee scientists have developed different kinds of tomato that attempt to manifest "perfect" taste. ©Tampa Bay Times / Andres Leiva / The Image Works
Best quality if reproduced no larger than 1/2 page.
Gainesville, Florida, July 13, 2017:  A Klee Lab member loads up samples of tomato into a gel electrophoresis machine. The machine, which uses electricity to separate strands of DNA, helps researchers determine which tomatoes are exhibiting desirable genetic traits, which in turn determines which tomatoes are used to further develop a strain.For about fifteen years, researchers at the University of Florida's Klee Lab have worked on understanding the chemical and genetic markers that determine the taste of tomatoes. Through genetic sequencing, biochemical analysis and panels of taste testing, Klee scientists have developed different kinds of tomato that attempt to manifest "perfect" taste.   ©Tampa Bay Times / Andres Leiva / The Image Works  Best quality if reproduced no larger than 1/2 page.
ESTP0013497.jpg
Gainesville, Florida, July 13, 2017: A Klee Lab member loads up samples of tomato into a gel electrophoresis machine. The machine, which uses electricity to separate strands of DNA, helps researchers determine which tomatoes are exhibiting desirable genetic traits, which in turn determines which tomatoes are used to further develop a strain.For about fifteen years, researchers at the University of Florida's Klee Lab have worked on understanding the chemical and genetic markers that determine the taste of tomatoes. Through genetic sequencing, biochemical analysis and panels of taste testing, Klee scientists have developed different kinds of tomato that attempt to manifest "perfect" taste. ©Tampa Bay Times / Andres Leiva / The Image Works
Best quality if reproduced no larger than 1/2 page.
Gainesville, Florida, July 13, 2017:  An employee of Florida's Klee Lab prepares a device developed by the lab that can capture a sample of a fruit's aroma, which is then analyzed by researchers. For about fifteen years, researchers at the University of Florida's Klee Lab have worked on understanding the chemical and genetic markers that determine the taste of tomatoes. Through genetic sequencing, biochemical analysis and panels of taste testing, Klee scientists have developed different kinds of tomato that attempt to manifest "perfect" taste.   ©Tampa Bay Times / Andres Leiva / The Image Works  Best quality if reproduced no larger than 1/2 page.
ESTP0013498.jpg
Gainesville, Florida, July 13, 2017: An employee of Florida's Klee Lab prepares a device developed by the lab that can capture a sample of a fruit's aroma, which is then analyzed by researchers. For about fifteen years, researchers at the University of Florida's Klee Lab have worked on understanding the chemical and genetic markers that determine the taste of tomatoes. Through genetic sequencing, biochemical analysis and panels of taste testing, Klee scientists have developed different kinds of tomato that attempt to manifest "perfect" taste. ©Tampa Bay Times / Andres Leiva / The Image Works
Best quality if reproduced no larger than 1/2 page.
Gainesville, Florida, July 13, 2017:  A Klee Lab member Grayson Clarke, 23, pours a bowl of tomato seeds into an envelop in Gainesville, Fla., on Thursday, Jul 13, 2017. The seeds are stored and may later be used to grow new tomato plants. For about fifteen years, researchers at the University of Florida's Klee Lab have worked on understanding the chemical and genetic markers that determine the taste of tomatoes. Through genetic sequencing, biochemical analysis and panels of taste testing, Klee scientists have developed different kinds of tomato that attempt to manifest "perfect" taste.    ©Tampa Bay Times / Andres Leiva / The Image Works  Best quality if reproduced no larger than 1/2 page.
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Gainesville, Florida, July 13, 2017: A Klee Lab member Grayson Clarke, 23, pours a bowl of tomato seeds into an envelop in Gainesville, Fla., on Thursday, Jul 13, 2017. The seeds are stored and may later be used to grow new tomato plants. For about fifteen years, researchers at the University of Florida's Klee Lab have worked on understanding the chemical and genetic markers that determine the taste of tomatoes. Through genetic sequencing, biochemical analysis and panels of taste testing, Klee scientists have developed different kinds of tomato that attempt to manifest "perfect" taste. ©Tampa Bay Times / Andres Leiva / The Image Works
Best quality if reproduced no larger than 1/2 page.
Gainesville, Florida, July 13, 2017:  A Klee Lab member examines the DNA of a tomato sample in the Klee Lab. Researchers identify which genetic markers are associated with desirable tomato characteristics, and then use that information to develop better strains of tomato. For about fifteen years, researchers at the University of Florida's Klee Lab have worked on understanding the chemical and genetic markers that determine the taste of tomatoes. Through genetic sequencing, biochemical analysis and panels of taste testing, Klee scientists have developed different kinds of tomato that attempt to manifest "perfect" taste.    ©Tampa Bay Times / Andres Leiva / The Image Works  Best quality if reproduced no larger than 1/2 page.
ESTP0013494.jpg
Gainesville, Florida, July 13, 2017: A Klee Lab member examines the DNA of a tomato sample in the Klee Lab. Researchers identify which genetic markers are associated with desirable tomato characteristics, and then use that information to develop better strains of tomato. For about fifteen years, researchers at the University of Florida's Klee Lab have worked on understanding the chemical and genetic markers that determine the taste of tomatoes. Through genetic sequencing, biochemical analysis and panels of taste testing, Klee scientists have developed different kinds of tomato that attempt to manifest "perfect" taste. ©Tampa Bay Times / Andres Leiva / The Image Works
Best quality if reproduced no larger than 1/2 page.
Gainesville, Florida, July 13, 2017:  An employee of the University of Florida's Klee Lab is seen picking tomatoes for analysis. For about fifteen years, researchers at the University of Florida's Klee Lab have worked on understanding the chemical and genetic markers that determine the taste of tomatoes. Through genetic sequencing, biochemical analysis and panels of taste testing, Klee scientists have developed different kinds of tomato that attempt to manifest "perfect" taste.    ©Tampa Bay Times / Andres Leiva / The Image Works  Best quality if reproduced no larger than 1/2 page.
ESTP0013496.jpg
Gainesville, Florida, July 13, 2017: An employee of the University of Florida's Klee Lab is seen picking tomatoes for analysis. For about fifteen years, researchers at the University of Florida's Klee Lab have worked on understanding the chemical and genetic markers that determine the taste of tomatoes. Through genetic sequencing, biochemical analysis and panels of taste testing, Klee scientists have developed different kinds of tomato that attempt to manifest "perfect" taste. ©Tampa Bay Times / Andres Leiva / The Image Works
Best quality if reproduced no larger than 1/2 page.
Gainesville, Florida, July 13, 2017:  A Klee Lab member crumbles a chunk of tomato seeds into a bowl. The seeds are stored and may later be used to grow new tomato plants. For about fifteen years, researchers at the University of Florida's Klee Lab have worked on understanding the chemical and genetic markers that determine the taste of tomatoes. Through genetic sequencing, biochemical analysis and panels of taste testing, Klee scientists have developed different kinds of tomato that attempt to manifest "perfect" taste.   ©Tampa Bay Times / Andres Leiva / The Image Works  Best quality if reproduced no larger than 1/2 page.
ESTP0013500.jpg
Gainesville, Florida, July 13, 2017: A Klee Lab member crumbles a chunk of tomato seeds into a bowl. The seeds are stored and may later be used to grow new tomato plants. For about fifteen years, researchers at the University of Florida's Klee Lab have worked on understanding the chemical and genetic markers that determine the taste of tomatoes. Through genetic sequencing, biochemical analysis and panels of taste testing, Klee scientists have developed different kinds of tomato that attempt to manifest "perfect" taste. ©Tampa Bay Times / Andres Leiva / The Image Works
Best quality if reproduced no larger than 1/2 page.

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