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TEUTONIC MYTH - ODIN. The god Odin, with his two ravens (reminders that he was once the leader of the Raven clan).  Odin was the leader of the Aesirs, and the patron god of warriors:  in this engraving he is portrayed as the God of the Dead, seated on a prehistoric tumulus grave.  Odin is said to have learned the secret of the runes after hanging for nine days on the gallows-tree.  He is also supposed to have sacrificed one of his eyes to the guardian giant, Mimir, for a drink of the magic cauldron [Odherir] that conferred Wisdom.   © Charles Walker / TopFoto / The Image Works
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TEUTONIC MYTH - ODIN. The god Odin, with his two ravens (reminders that he was once the leader of the Raven clan). Odin was the leader of the Aesirs, and the patron god of warriors: in this engraving he is portrayed as the God of the Dead, seated on a prehistoric tumulus grave. Odin is said to have learned the secret of the runes after hanging for nine days on the gallows-tree. He is also supposed to have sacrificed one of his eyes to the guardian giant, Mimir, for a drink of the magic cauldron [Odherir] that conferred Wisdom. © Charles Walker / TopFoto / The Image Works
The Maroons in Ambush on the Dromilly Estate in the Parish of Trelawney, Jamaica, by Bourgoin; engraved by Merigot. Illustrated by Cribb Published in 1801. ©The British Library Board/ The Image Works
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The Maroons in Ambush on the Dromilly Estate in the Parish of Trelawney, Jamaica, by Bourgoin; engraved by Merigot. Illustrated by Cribb Published in 1801. ©The British Library Board/ The Image Works
Austria: The south tower of the 14th century Romanesque Gothic St. Stephen's Cathedral, Stephansplatz, Vienna - St. Stephen's Cathedral is the mother church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Vienna and the seat of the Archbishop of Vienna.  The current Romanesque and Gothic form of the cathedral, seen today in the Stephansplatz, was largely initiated by Duke Rudolf IV (1339–1365) and stands on the ruins of two earlier churches, the first a parish church consecrated in 1147.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Austria: The south tower of the 14th century Romanesque Gothic St. Stephen's Cathedral, Stephansplatz, Vienna - St. Stephen's Cathedral is the mother church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Vienna and the seat of the Archbishop of Vienna.

The current Romanesque and Gothic form of the cathedral, seen today in the Stephansplatz, was largely initiated by Duke Rudolf IV (1339–1365) and stands on the ruins of two earlier churches, the first a parish church consecrated in 1147. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Austria: The 14th century Romanesque Gothic St. Stephen's Cathedral, Stephansplatz, Vienna - St. Stephen's Cathedral is the mother church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Vienna and the seat of the Archbishop of Vienna.  The current Romanesque and Gothic form of the cathedral, seen today in the Stephansplatz, was largely initiated by Duke Rudolf IV (1339–1365) and stands on the ruins of two earlier churches, the first a parish church consecrated in 1147.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Austria: The 14th century Romanesque Gothic St. Stephen's Cathedral, Stephansplatz, Vienna - St. Stephen's Cathedral is the mother church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Vienna and the seat of the Archbishop of Vienna.

The current Romanesque and Gothic form of the cathedral, seen today in the Stephansplatz, was largely initiated by Duke Rudolf IV (1339–1365) and stands on the ruins of two earlier churches, the first a parish church consecrated in 1147. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Austria: The western Roman towers and entrance to the 14th century Romanesque Gothic St. Stephen's Cathedral, Stephansplatz, Vienna - St. Stephen's Cathedral is the mother church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Vienna and the seat of the Archbishop of Vienna.  The current Romanesque and Gothic form of the cathedral, seen today in the Stephansplatz, was largely initiated by Duke Rudolf IV (1339–1365) and stands on the ruins of two earlier churches, the first a parish church consecrated in 1147.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Austria: The western Roman towers and entrance to the 14th century Romanesque Gothic St. Stephen's Cathedral, Stephansplatz, Vienna - St. Stephen's Cathedral is the mother church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Vienna and the seat of the Archbishop of Vienna.

The current Romanesque and Gothic form of the cathedral, seen today in the Stephansplatz, was largely initiated by Duke Rudolf IV (1339–1365) and stands on the ruins of two earlier churches, the first a parish church consecrated in 1147. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Austria: The western Roman towers and entrance to the 14th century Romanesque Gothic St. Stephen's Cathedral, Stephansplatz, Vienna - St. Stephen's Cathedral is the mother church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Vienna and the seat of the Archbishop of Vienna.  The current Romanesque and Gothic form of the cathedral, seen today in the Stephansplatz, was largely initiated by Duke Rudolf IV (1339–1365) and stands on the ruins of two earlier churches, the first a parish church consecrated in 1147.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Austria: The western Roman towers and entrance to the 14th century Romanesque Gothic St. Stephen's Cathedral, Stephansplatz, Vienna - St. Stephen's Cathedral is the mother church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Vienna and the seat of the Archbishop of Vienna.

The current Romanesque and Gothic form of the cathedral, seen today in the Stephansplatz, was largely initiated by Duke Rudolf IV (1339–1365) and stands on the ruins of two earlier churches, the first a parish church consecrated in 1147. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
United Kingdom: A modern statue of St Aidan in the Lindisfarne Priory ruins, Lindisfarne, England. Sculptor Kathleen Parbury, 1958 - Aidan of Lindisfarne (died 31 August 651) was an Irish monk and missionary credited with restoring Christianity to Northumbria. He founded a monastic cathedral on the island of Lindisfarne, known as Lindisfarne Priory, served as its first bishop, and travelled ceaselessly throughout the countryside, spreading the gospel to both the Anglo-Saxon nobility and the socially disenfranchised (including children and slaves).  He is known as the Apostle of Northumbria and is recognised as a saint by the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Catholic Church, the Anglican Communion and others.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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United Kingdom: A modern statue of St Aidan in the Lindisfarne Priory ruins, Lindisfarne, England. Sculptor Kathleen Parbury, 1958 - Aidan of Lindisfarne (died 31 August 651) was an Irish monk and missionary credited with restoring Christianity to Northumbria. He founded a monastic cathedral on the island of Lindisfarne, known as Lindisfarne Priory, served as its first bishop, and travelled ceaselessly throughout the countryside, spreading the gospel to both the Anglo-Saxon nobility and the socially disenfranchised (including children and slaves).

He is known as the Apostle of Northumbria and is recognised as a saint by the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Catholic Church, the Anglican Communion and others. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Austria: The Roman towers above the western entrance of the 14th century Romanesque Gothic St. Stephen's Cathedral, Stephansplatz, Vienna - St. Stephen's Cathedral is the mother church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Vienna and the seat of the Archbishop of Vienna.  The current Romanesque and Gothic form of the cathedral, seen today in the Stephansplatz, was largely initiated by Duke Rudolf IV (1339–1365) and stands on the ruins of two earlier churches, the first a parish church consecrated in 1147.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Austria: The Roman towers above the western entrance of the 14th century Romanesque Gothic St. Stephen's Cathedral, Stephansplatz, Vienna - St. Stephen's Cathedral is the mother church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Vienna and the seat of the Archbishop of Vienna.

The current Romanesque and Gothic form of the cathedral, seen today in the Stephansplatz, was largely initiated by Duke Rudolf IV (1339–1365) and stands on the ruins of two earlier churches, the first a parish church consecrated in 1147. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
United Kingdom: A modern statue of St Aidan in the Lindisfarne Priory ruins, Lindisfarne, England. Sculptor Kathleen Parbury, 1958 - Aidan of Lindisfarne (died 31 August 651) was an Irish monk and missionary credited with restoring Christianity to Northumbria. He founded a monastic cathedral on the island of Lindisfarne, known as Lindisfarne Priory, served as its first bishop, and travelled ceaselessly throughout the countryside, spreading the gospel to both the Anglo-Saxon nobility and the socially disenfranchised (including children and slaves).  He is known as the Apostle of Northumbria and is recognised as a saint by the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Catholic Church, the Anglican Communion and others.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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United Kingdom: A modern statue of St Aidan in the Lindisfarne Priory ruins, Lindisfarne, England. Sculptor Kathleen Parbury, 1958 - Aidan of Lindisfarne (died 31 August 651) was an Irish monk and missionary credited with restoring Christianity to Northumbria. He founded a monastic cathedral on the island of Lindisfarne, known as Lindisfarne Priory, served as its first bishop, and travelled ceaselessly throughout the countryside, spreading the gospel to both the Anglo-Saxon nobility and the socially disenfranchised (including children and slaves).

He is known as the Apostle of Northumbria and is recognised as a saint by the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Catholic Church, the Anglican Communion and others. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
United Kingdom: A modern statue of St Aidan in the Lindisfarne Priory ruins, Lindisfarne, England. Sculptor Kathleen Parbury, 1958 - Aidan of Lindisfarne (died 31 August 651) was an Irish monk and missionary credited with restoring Christianity to Northumbria. He founded a monastic cathedral on the island of Lindisfarne, known as Lindisfarne Priory, served as its first bishop, and travelled ceaselessly throughout the countryside, spreading the gospel to both the Anglo-Saxon nobility and the socially disenfranchised (including children and slaves).  He is known as the Apostle of Northumbria and is recognised as a saint by the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Catholic Church, the Anglican Communion and others.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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United Kingdom: A modern statue of St Aidan in the Lindisfarne Priory ruins, Lindisfarne, England. Sculptor Kathleen Parbury, 1958 - Aidan of Lindisfarne (died 31 August 651) was an Irish monk and missionary credited with restoring Christianity to Northumbria. He founded a monastic cathedral on the island of Lindisfarne, known as Lindisfarne Priory, served as its first bishop, and travelled ceaselessly throughout the countryside, spreading the gospel to both the Anglo-Saxon nobility and the socially disenfranchised (including children and slaves).

He is known as the Apostle of Northumbria and is recognised as a saint by the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Catholic Church, the Anglican Communion and others. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: A bronze copy of 'Judith and Holofernes', Piazza della Signoria, Florence. Sculpted by Donatello (c. 1386 - 1466) between 1457 and 1464 - Judith is seen wielding a sword and about to cut the Assyrian general Holofernes' throat.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: A bronze copy of 'Judith and Holofernes', Piazza della Signoria, Florence. Sculpted by Donatello (c. 1386 - 1466) between 1457 and 1464 - Judith is seen wielding a sword and about to cut the Assyrian general Holofernes' throat. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: A marble statue portraying 'Hercules and Cacus', Piazza della Signoria, Florence. Sculpted by Baccio Bandinelli (1488 - 1560) between 1525 and 1534 - Hercules is seen here subduing and later killing the fire-belching monster Cacus who had been stealing cattle. This was during the completion of Hercules' tenth labour.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: A marble statue portraying 'Hercules and Cacus', Piazza della Signoria, Florence. Sculpted by Baccio Bandinelli (1488 - 1560) between 1525 and 1534 - Hercules is seen here subduing and later killing the fire-belching monster Cacus who had been stealing cattle. This was during the completion of Hercules' tenth labour. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: A marble statue portraying 'Hercules and Cacus', Piazza della Signoria, Florence. Sculpted by Baccio Bandinelli (1488 - 1560) between 1525 and 1534 - Hercules is seen here subduing and later killing the fire-belching monster Cacus who had been stealing cattle. This was during the completion of Hercules' tenth labour.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: A marble statue portraying 'Hercules and Cacus', Piazza della Signoria, Florence. Sculpted by Baccio Bandinelli (1488 - 1560) between 1525 and 1534 - Hercules is seen here subduing and later killing the fire-belching monster Cacus who had been stealing cattle. This was during the completion of Hercules' tenth labour. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Arch of St. Donatus (unknown - 362), patron saint of Arezzo, Arezzo Cathedral, Arezzo, Tuscany - The first cathedral of Arezzo was built on the nearby Pionta Hill, over the burial place of Donatus of Arezzo, martyred in 363. In 1203 Pope Innocent III had the cathedral moved within the city's walls, to the current site.  The construction of the current structure, started in 1278, went through different phases, and ended in 1511. The façade was built in 1901-1914, replacing the previous, unfinished one, dating to the 15th century.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Arch of St. Donatus (unknown - 362), patron saint of Arezzo, Arezzo Cathedral, Arezzo, Tuscany - The first cathedral of Arezzo was built on the nearby Pionta Hill, over the burial place of Donatus of Arezzo, martyred in 363. In 1203 Pope Innocent III had the cathedral moved within the city's walls, to the current site.

The construction of the current structure, started in 1278, went through different phases, and ended in 1511. The façade was built in 1901-1914, replacing the previous, unfinished one, dating to the 15th century. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Arch of St. Donatus (unknown - 362), patron saint of Arezzo, Arezzo Cathedral, Arezzo, Tuscany - The first cathedral of Arezzo was built on the nearby Pionta Hill, over the burial place of Donatus of Arezzo, martyred in 363. In 1203 Pope Innocent III had the cathedral moved within the city's walls, to the current site.  The construction of the current structure, started in 1278, went through different phases, and ended in 1511. The façade was built in 1901-1914, replacing the previous, unfinished one, dating to the 15th century.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Arch of St. Donatus (unknown - 362), patron saint of Arezzo, Arezzo Cathedral, Arezzo, Tuscany - The first cathedral of Arezzo was built on the nearby Pionta Hill, over the burial place of Donatus of Arezzo, martyred in 363. In 1203 Pope Innocent III had the cathedral moved within the city's walls, to the current site.

The construction of the current structure, started in 1278, went through different phases, and ended in 1511. The façade was built in 1901-1914, replacing the previous, unfinished one, dating to the 15th century. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: A copy of the 'Chimera of Arezzo' (the original dating from c. 400 BCE), Arezzo, Tuscany - The bronze 'Chimera of Arezzo' is one of the best known examples of the art of the Etruscans.  In Greek mythology the monstrous Chimera ravaged its homeland, Lycia, until it was slain by Bellerophon. The goat head of the Chimera has a wound inflicted by this Greek hero. Based on the cowering, representation of fear, and the wound inflicted, this sculpture may have been part of a set that would have included a bronze sculpture of Bellerophon.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: A copy of the 'Chimera of Arezzo' (the original dating from c. 400 BCE), Arezzo, Tuscany - The bronze 'Chimera of Arezzo' is one of the best known examples of the art of the Etruscans.

In Greek mythology the monstrous Chimera ravaged its homeland, Lycia, until it was slain by Bellerophon. The goat head of the Chimera has a wound inflicted by this Greek hero. Based on the cowering, representation of fear, and the wound inflicted, this sculpture may have been part of a set that would have included a bronze sculpture of Bellerophon. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: A Roman fresco showing a theatrical mask in the Casa del Menandro (House of Menander), Pompeii (destroyed CE 79) - The estate, first built in 250 BCE, is referred to as 'The House of Menander' because there is a well-preserved fresco of the ancient Greek Dramatist Menander in a small room in the house.  Menander (c. 342/41 – c. 290 BCE) wrote 108 comedies and took the prize at the Lenaia festival eight times. One of the most popular writers of antiquity, his work was lost during the Middle Ages and is known in modernity in highly fragmentary form, much of which was discovered in the 20th century. Only one play, Dyskolos, has survived almost entirely.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: A Roman fresco showing a theatrical mask in the Casa del Menandro (House of Menander), Pompeii (destroyed CE 79) - The estate, first built in 250 BCE, is referred to as 'The House of Menander' because there is a well-preserved fresco of the ancient Greek Dramatist Menander in a small room in the house.

Menander (c. 342/41 – c. 290 BCE) wrote 108 comedies and took the prize at the Lenaia festival eight times. One of the most popular writers of antiquity, his work was lost during the Middle Ages and is known in modernity in highly fragmentary form, much of which was discovered in the 20th century. Only one play, Dyskolos, has survived almost entirely. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Tomb of Pope Gregory X (c. 1210 - 1276), Arezzo Cathedral, Arezzo, Tuscany - Pope Gregory X (c. 1210 – 10 January 1276), born Teobaldo Visconti, was Pope from 1 September 1271 to his death in 1276 and was a member of the Secular Franciscan Order. He was elected at the conclusion of a papal election that ran from 1268 to 1271, the longest papal election in the history of the Catholic Church.  The first cathedral of Arezzo was built on the nearby Pionta Hill, over the burial place of Donatus of Arezzo, martyred in 363. In 1203 Pope Innocent III had the cathedral moved within the city's walls, to the current site.  The construction of the current structure, started in 1278, went through different phases, and ended in 1511. The façade was built in 1901-1914, replacing the previous, unfinished one, dating to the 15th century.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Tomb of Pope Gregory X (c. 1210 - 1276), Arezzo Cathedral, Arezzo, Tuscany - Pope Gregory X (c. 1210 – 10 January 1276), born Teobaldo Visconti, was Pope from 1 September 1271 to his death in 1276 and was a member of the Secular Franciscan Order. He was elected at the conclusion of a papal election that ran from 1268 to 1271, the longest papal election in the history of the Catholic Church.

The first cathedral of Arezzo was built on the nearby Pionta Hill, over the burial place of Donatus of Arezzo, martyred in 363. In 1203 Pope Innocent III had the cathedral moved within the city's walls, to the current site.

The construction of the current structure, started in 1278, went through different phases, and ended in 1511. The façade was built in 1901-1914, replacing the previous, unfinished one, dating to the 15th century. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: The ancient Greek goddess Artemis,  Roman fresco in the Casa del Menandro (House of Menander), Pompeii (destroyed CE 79) - The estate, first built in 250 BCE, is referred to as 'The House of Menander' because there is a well-preserved fresco of the ancient Greek Dramatist Menander in a small room in the house.  Menander (c. 342/41 – c. 290 BCE) wrote 108 comedies and took the prize at the Lenaia festival eight times. One of the most popular writers of antiquity, his work was lost during the Middle Ages and is known in modernity in highly fragmentary form, much of which was discovered in the 20th century. Only one play, Dyskolos, has survived almost entirely.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: The ancient Greek goddess Artemis, Roman fresco in the Casa del Menandro (House of Menander), Pompeii (destroyed CE 79) - The estate, first built in 250 BCE, is referred to as 'The House of Menander' because there is a well-preserved fresco of the ancient Greek Dramatist Menander in a small room in the house.

Menander (c. 342/41 – c. 290 BCE) wrote 108 comedies and took the prize at the Lenaia festival eight times. One of the most popular writers of antiquity, his work was lost during the Middle Ages and is known in modernity in highly fragmentary form, much of which was discovered in the 20th century. Only one play, Dyskolos, has survived almost entirely. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Statue of Ferdinando I de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany (1549 - 1609), in front of Arezzo Cathedral, Arezzo, Tuscany - Ferdinando I de' Medici (30 July 1549 – 17 February 1609) was Grand Duke of Tuscany from 1587 to 1609, having succeeded his older brother Francesco I.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Statue of Ferdinando I de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany (1549 - 1609), in front of Arezzo Cathedral, Arezzo, Tuscany - Ferdinando I de' Medici (30 July 1549 – 17 February 1609) was Grand Duke of Tuscany from 1587 to 1609, having succeeded his older brother Francesco I. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: A Roman fresco showing the death of the Greek Actaeon, turned into a stag by the goddess Artemis, and killed by his own dogs, Casa del Menandro (House of Menander), Pompeii (destroyed CE 79) - The estate, first built in 250 BCE, is referred to as 'The House of Menander' because there is a well-preserved fresco of the ancient Greek Dramatist Menander in a small room in the house.  Menander (c. 342/41 – c. 290 BCE) wrote 108 comedies and took the prize at the Lenaia festival eight times. One of the most popular writers of antiquity, his work was lost during the Middle Ages and is known in modernity in highly fragmentary form, much of which was discovered in the 20th century. Only one play, Dyskolos, has survived almost entirely.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: A Roman fresco showing the death of the Greek Actaeon, turned into a stag by the goddess Artemis, and killed by his own dogs, Casa del Menandro (House of Menander), Pompeii (destroyed CE 79) - The estate, first built in 250 BCE, is referred to as 'The House of Menander' because there is a well-preserved fresco of the ancient Greek Dramatist Menander in a small room in the house.

Menander (c. 342/41 – c. 290 BCE) wrote 108 comedies and took the prize at the Lenaia festival eight times. One of the most popular writers of antiquity, his work was lost during the Middle Ages and is known in modernity in highly fragmentary form, much of which was discovered in the 20th century. Only one play, Dyskolos, has survived almost entirely. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Bronze Centaur, half man half horse, by Polish sculptor Igor Mitoraj, 1944 - 2014), in the Forum at Pompeii (2018) - Igor Mitoraj (26 March 1944 – 6 October 2014) was a Polish artist. His sculptural style is rooted in the classical tradition with its focus on the well modelled torso.  A centaur is a creature from Greek mythology with the upper body of a human and the lower body and legs of a horse. Centaurs are thought of in many Greek myths as being as wild as untamed horses. They subsequently featured in Roman mythology, and were familiar figures in the medieval bestiary.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Bronze Centaur, half man half horse, by Polish sculptor Igor Mitoraj, 1944 - 2014), in the Forum at Pompeii (2018) - Igor Mitoraj (26 March 1944 – 6 October 2014) was a Polish artist. His sculptural style is rooted in the classical tradition with its focus on the well modelled torso.

A centaur is a creature from Greek mythology with the upper body of a human and the lower body and legs of a horse. Centaurs are thought of in many Greek myths as being as wild as untamed horses. They subsequently featured in Roman mythology, and were familiar figures in the medieval bestiary. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: A detail of a human torso below the Bronze Centaur, half man half horse, by Polish sculptor Igor Mitoraj, 1944 - 2014), in the Forum at Pompeii (2018) - Igor Mitoraj (26 March 1944 – 6 October 2014) was a Polish artist. His sculptural style is rooted in the classical tradition with its focus on the well modelled torso.  A centaur is a creature from Greek mythology with the upper body of a human and the lower body and legs of a horse. Centaurs are thought of in many Greek myths as being as wild as untamed horses. They subsequently featured in Roman mythology, and were familiar figures in the medieval bestiary.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: A detail of a human torso below the Bronze Centaur, half man half horse, by Polish sculptor Igor Mitoraj, 1944 - 2014), in the Forum at Pompeii (2018) - Igor Mitoraj (26 March 1944 – 6 October 2014) was a Polish artist. His sculptural style is rooted in the classical tradition with its focus on the well modelled torso.

A centaur is a creature from Greek mythology with the upper body of a human and the lower body and legs of a horse. Centaurs are thought of in many Greek myths as being as wild as untamed horses. They subsequently featured in Roman mythology, and were familiar figures in the medieval bestiary. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Bronze Centaur, half man half horse, by Polish sculptor Igor Mitoraj, 1944 - 2014), in the Forum at Pompeii (2018) - Igor Mitoraj (26 March 1944 – 6 October 2014) was a Polish artist. His sculptural style is rooted in the classical tradition with its focus on the well modelled torso.  A centaur is a creature from Greek mythology with the upper body of a human and the lower body and legs of a horse. Centaurs are thought of in many Greek myths as being as wild as untamed horses. They subsequently featured in Roman mythology, and were familiar figures in the medieval bestiary.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Bronze Centaur, half man half horse, by Polish sculptor Igor Mitoraj, 1944 - 2014), in the Forum at Pompeii (2018) - Igor Mitoraj (26 March 1944 – 6 October 2014) was a Polish artist. His sculptural style is rooted in the classical tradition with its focus on the well modelled torso.

A centaur is a creature from Greek mythology with the upper body of a human and the lower body and legs of a horse. Centaurs are thought of in many Greek myths as being as wild as untamed horses. They subsequently featured in Roman mythology, and were familiar figures in the medieval bestiary. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Cuba: Cirilo Villaverde (1812 - 1894), Cuban poet, novelist and freedom fighter, Havana - Cirilo Villaverde de la Paz (1812 - 1894) was a Cuban poet, novelist, journalist and freedom fighter. He is best known for Cecilia Valdés, a novel about classes and races in colonial Cuba.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Cuba: Cirilo Villaverde (1812 - 1894), Cuban poet, novelist and freedom fighter, Havana - Cirilo Villaverde de la Paz (1812 - 1894) was a Cuban poet, novelist, journalist and freedom fighter. He is best known for Cecilia Valdés, a novel about classes and races in colonial Cuba. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works

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