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Germany: June 20, 1929. Pigeon takes photographs while in flight, remarkable new development . Specially made automatic camera, which can be set for any time, and so small and delicate in its workings that it can be worn by a pigeon in flight, without hampering it, and yet take perfect pictures, has just been tested in Germany. The invention has been developed secretly and the disclosure of the secret has led to discussions of its use by several of the European Foreign Offices. The employment of a battalion of these pigeon photographers, flying unsuspected over enemy lines or camps during war time, would be of invaluable aid to any country.  © SSPL / Planet News Archive / The Image Works
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Germany: June 20, 1929. Pigeon takes photographs while in flight, remarkable new development . Specially made automatic camera, which can be set for any time, and so small and delicate in its workings that it can be worn by a pigeon in flight, without hampering it, and yet take perfect pictures, has just been tested in Germany. The invention has been developed secretly and the disclosure of the secret has led to discussions of its use by several of the European Foreign Offices. The employment of a battalion of these pigeon photographers, flying unsuspected over enemy lines or camps during war time, would be of invaluable aid to any country. © SSPL / Planet News Archive / The Image Works
Jean Dessès (1904-1970). Evening dress made of white tulle by Pierre Brivet, embroidered with crystal by Goby. Train made with silk tulle. Palace of Versailles (France), Spring-Summer 1957. Photograph by Henry Clarke (1918-1996), published in Vogue France, April 1957, page 100. Galliera, musée de la Mode de la Ville de Paris. © Henry Clarke / Galliera / Roger-Viollet / The Image Works
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Jean Dessès (1904-1970). Evening dress made of white tulle by Pierre Brivet, embroidered with crystal by Goby. Train made with silk tulle. Palace of Versailles (France), Spring-Summer 1957. Photograph by Henry Clarke (1918-1996), published in Vogue France, April 1957, page 100. Galliera, musée de la Mode de la Ville de Paris. © Henry Clarke / Galliera / Roger-Viollet / The Image Works
Ithaca, NY:  Museum of Flopped Products.  Mike Greenlar/ The Image Works
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Ithaca, NY: Museum of Flopped Products. Mike Greenlar/ The Image Works
Louis Leon Cesar Faidherbe ; French general (1854–61) and governor of Senegambia (1862–65); in the Franco-Prussian war he then served as commander of the Army of the North.*1818-1889+.  In the middle of his staff. Saint-Louis (Sénégal).  ©Roger-Viollet / The Image Works
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Louis Leon Cesar Faidherbe ; French general (1854–61) and governor of Senegambia (1862–65); in the Franco-Prussian war he then served as commander of the Army of the North.*1818-1889+. In the middle of his staff. Saint-Louis (Sénégal). ©Roger-Viollet / The Image Works
New York, NY: September 1970,  Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (STAR), at the Gay Liberation Front occupation of NYU Weinstein Hall. .   ©Ellen Shumsky / The Image Works Best quality if reproduced no larger than 1/2 page @ 300 dpi
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New York, NY: September 1970, Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (STAR), at the Gay Liberation Front occupation of NYU Weinstein Hall. . ©Ellen Shumsky / The Image Works
Best quality if reproduced no larger than 1/2 page @ 300 dpi
Paris, France: August 1914. World War I. The Galeries Lafayette department store. Sewers in charge of mending military clothing.  Photograph from the Identification service of the prefecture of police (Préfecture de police, Service de l'Identité judiciaire). Bibliothèque historique de la Ville de Paris.  © Préfecture de Police, Service de l'Identité judiciaire/BHVP/Roger-Viollet/The Image Works
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Paris, France: August 1914. World War I. The Galeries Lafayette department store. Sewers in charge of mending military clothing. Photograph from the Identification service of the prefecture of police (Préfecture de police, Service de l'Identité judiciaire). Bibliothèque historique de la Ville de Paris. © Préfecture de Police, Service de l'Identité judiciaire/BHVP/Roger-Viollet/The Image Works
Sarah Orne JEWETT, *1849-1909+, American writer - Cabinet photograph, c1880  ©histopics / ullstein bild / The Image Works
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Sarah Orne JEWETT, *1849-1909+, American writer - Cabinet photograph, c1880 ©histopics / ullstein bild / The Image Works
Dominican Republic: A hospital in Santo Domingo with injuries after a hurricane. About 1935. Photograph. ©Austrian Archives / Imagno / The Image Works
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Dominican Republic: A hospital in Santo Domingo with injuries after a hurricane. About 1935. Photograph. ©Austrian Archives / Imagno / The Image Works
Dominican Republic: Food for the by a hurricane destroyed Santo Domingo. 19th September 1930. Photograph. ©Austrian Archives / Imagno / The Image Works
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Dominican Republic: Food for the by a hurricane destroyed Santo Domingo. 19th September 1930. Photograph. ©Austrian Archives / Imagno / The Image Works
Dominican Republic: Hurricane damage in a street of Santo Domingo. Published: Tempo September 18, 1930   ©ullstein bild / The Image Works
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Dominican Republic: Hurricane damage in a street of Santo Domingo. Published: Tempo September 18, 1930 ©ullstein bild / The Image Works
MN: Early 1900's historic photograph of a Ojibway (Chippewa) woman making syrup by boiling away the water content over an open fire on the Red Lake Reservation in Minnesota.   ©Marilyn Angel Wynn / The Image Works
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MN: Early 1900's historic photograph of a Ojibway (Chippewa) woman making syrup by boiling away the water content over an open fire on the Red Lake Reservation in Minnesota. ©Marilyn Angel Wynn / The Image Works
Late 1800's historic photo of a Chippewa woman weaving a rush mat to be used inside her traditional shelter.   ©Marilyn Angel Wynn / The Image Works
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Late 1800's historic photo of a Chippewa woman weaving a rush mat to be used inside her traditional shelter. ©Marilyn Angel Wynn / The Image Works
Plan of Blast Furnace - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows a blast furnace in Great Britain, where the enormous quantity of iron produced from clay ironstone was first obtained in the state of cast iron by the process of smelting. In this process the clay ironstone is roasted after having been broken up into lumps. When ready, the ore is then put in a blast furnace (seen here), a structure about 40 to 50 feet high and 12 to 17 fet in internal diameter at its widest part. At E is the crucible, the bottom of which is called the hearth, and is usually formed of infusible sandstone. A is the tympstone and above it an opening through which the slag overflows. O is an opening for the pipes or tuyeres (plan of tuyeres shown here), which are connected with blowing machines supplying a constant blast of air. At the lowest point of the furnace is a tap-hole, which is completely closed by sand and clay, except when opened to allow the melted metal to be drawn off. Around the chimney is a gallery and at C is an opening through which the charges are introduced.     © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
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Plan of Blast Furnace - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows a blast furnace in Great Britain, where the enormous quantity of iron produced from clay ironstone was first obtained in the state of cast iron by the process of smelting. In this process the clay ironstone is roasted after having been broken up into lumps. When ready, the ore is then put in a blast furnace (seen here), a structure about 40 to 50 feet high and 12 to 17 fet in internal diameter at its widest part. At E is the crucible, the bottom of which is called the hearth, and is usually formed of infusible sandstone. A is the tympstone and above it an opening through which the slag overflows. O is an opening for the pipes or tuyeres (plan of tuyeres shown here), which are connected with blowing machines supplying a constant blast of air. At the lowest point of the furnace is a tap-hole, which is completely closed by sand and clay, except when opened to allow the melted metal to be drawn off. Around the chimney is a gallery and at C is an opening through which the charges are introduced. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Section of Blast Furnace - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows a blast furnace in Great Britain, where the enormous quantity of iron produced from clay ironstone was first obtained in the state of cast iron by the process of smelting. In this process the clay ironstone is roasted after having been broken up into lumps. When ready, the ore is then put in a blast furnace (seen here), a structure about 40 to 50 feet high and 12 to 17 fet in internal diameter at its widest part. At E is the crucible, the bottom of which is called the hearth, and is usually formed of infusible sandstone. A is the tympstone and above it an opening through which the slag overflows. O is an opening for the pipes, which are connected with blowing machines supplying a constant blast of air. At the lowest point of the furnace is a tap-hole, which is completely closed by sand and clay, except when opened to allow the melted metal to be drawn off. Around the chimney is a gallery and at C is an opening through which the charges are introduced. Access is obtained to this gallery, a portion of which is seen at the left-hand side here.     © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
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Section of Blast Furnace - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows a blast furnace in Great Britain, where the enormous quantity of iron produced from clay ironstone was first obtained in the state of cast iron by the process of smelting. In this process the clay ironstone is roasted after having been broken up into lumps. When ready, the ore is then put in a blast furnace (seen here), a structure about 40 to 50 feet high and 12 to 17 fet in internal diameter at its widest part. At E is the crucible, the bottom of which is called the hearth, and is usually formed of infusible sandstone. A is the tympstone and above it an opening through which the slag overflows. O is an opening for the pipes, which are connected with blowing machines supplying a constant blast of air. At the lowest point of the furnace is a tap-hole, which is completely closed by sand and clay, except when opened to allow the melted metal to be drawn off. Around the chimney is a gallery and at C is an opening through which the charges are introduced. Access is obtained to this gallery, a portion of which is seen at the left-hand side here. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Blast Furnace - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows a blast furnace in Great Britain, where the enormous quantity of iron produced from clay ironstone was first obtained in the state of cast iron by the process of smelting. In thisprocess the clay ironstone is roasted after having been broken up into lumps. When ready, the ore is then put in a blast furnace (seen here), a structure about 40 to 50 feet high and 12 to 17 fet in internal diameter at its widest part.     © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG7123891.jpg
Blast Furnace - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows a blast furnace in Great Britain, where the enormous quantity of iron produced from clay ironstone was first obtained in the state of cast iron by the process of smelting. In thisprocess the clay ironstone is roasted after having been broken up into lumps. When ready, the ore is then put in a blast furnace (seen here), a structure about 40 to 50 feet high and 12 to 17 fet in internal diameter at its widest part. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Aerolite in British Museum - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows an aerolite in the British Museum in London, England. The aerolites or meteoric stones, which fall onto Earth from outer space, consist usually of little else than metallic iron, alloyed with a little nickel. These meteorites are sometimes huge. One found in South America is calculated to weight 14 tons.     © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
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Aerolite in British Museum - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows an aerolite in the British Museum in London, England. The aerolites or meteoric stones, which fall onto Earth from outer space, consist usually of little else than metallic iron, alloyed with a little nickel. These meteorites are sometimes huge. One found in South America is calculated to weight 14 tons. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Foundry - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows a foundry, a workshop or factory for casting metal, in England in the 1870s.     © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
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Foundry - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows a foundry, a workshop or factory for casting metal, in England in the 1870s. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Great Steam Hammer Royal Gun Factory Woolwich - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows the Great Steam Hammer Royal Gun Factory Woolwich. The hammer was, at the time, thought to be one of the most powerful steam hammers ever constructed. Its purpose was to forge great guns for the British Navy. The hammer was made by Nasymth & Co. Its height is about 50 feet and it is surrounded with furnaces and powerful cranes, carrying the huge iron tomgs that are to grap the glowing masses. Th hammer descend not merely with its own weight of 30 tons; steam is injected behind the falling piston, which is thus driven down with vastly enhanced rapidity and impulse.     © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
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Great Steam Hammer Royal Gun Factory Woolwich - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows the Great Steam Hammer Royal Gun Factory Woolwich. The hammer was, at the time, thought to be one of the most powerful steam hammers ever constructed. Its purpose was to forge great guns for the British Navy. The hammer was made by Nasymth & Co. Its height is about 50 feet and it is surrounded with furnaces and powerful cranes, carrying the huge iron tomgs that are to grap the glowing masses. Th hammer descend not merely with its own weight of 30 tons; steam is injected behind the falling piston, which is thus driven down with vastly enhanced rapidity and impulse. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Merryweather's Steam Fire Engine - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows Merryweather's Steam Fire Engine. Merryweather &Sons was an 1800s firm in the Clapham (later Greenwich) section of London that produced steam fire engines and steam tram engines. They had vertical boiler (as seen here) that they put onto a platform that was then drawn by horses. It improved fire pressure - great for fighting fires.     © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
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Merryweather's Steam Fire Engine - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows Merryweather's Steam Fire Engine. Merryweather &Sons was an 1800s firm in the Clapham (later Greenwich) section of London that produced steam fire engines and steam tram engines. They had vertical boiler (as seen here) that they put onto a platform that was then drawn by horses. It improved fire pressure - great for fighting fires. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Delano, CA: January 3, 1966. First Grape Stike by National Farm Workers Association (NFWA) and AWOC. The joyous march of campesinos led by Cesar Chavez (fcenter), the leader of the United Farm Workers' Union.  In the fall of 1965 when the grape pickers of Delano, CA, went on strike, the history of American farming was altered forever.  © 1976 George Ballis/Take Stock / The Image Works
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Delano, CA: January 3, 1966. First Grape Stike by National Farm Workers Association (NFWA) and AWOC. The joyous march of campesinos led by Cesar Chavez (fcenter), the leader of the United Farm Workers' Union. In the fall of 1965 when the grape pickers of Delano, CA, went on strike, the history of American farming was altered forever. © 1976 George Ballis/Take Stock / The Image Works
VIRGINIA WOOLF, AUTHOR. 1929. ©Topfoto/ The Image Works
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VIRGINIA WOOLF, AUTHOR. 1929. ©Topfoto/ The Image Works
Plennie Wingo walking backwards around the world. 1931  ©SZ Photo / Scherl / The Image Works
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Plennie Wingo walking backwards around the world. 1931 ©SZ Photo / Scherl / The Image Works
Tampa, Florida  12/7/1998.  The Fabulous Sports Babe broadcast her national show from the Press Box sports bar in honor of the Bucs Monday night's game against the Green Bay Packers.  Nanci Donnellan, known to radio call-in fans across the country as the highly opinionated "Fabulous Sports Babe," shows her true toughness with her winning battle against breast cancer. TAMPA FL  1998-12-07   Tampa Bay Times ©Tampa Bay Times / Jock Fistick / The Image Works  Best quality if reproduced no larger than 1/2 page.
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Tampa, Florida 12/7/1998. The Fabulous Sports Babe broadcast her national show from the Press Box sports bar in honor of the Bucs Monday night's game against the Green Bay Packers. Nanci Donnellan, known to radio call-in fans across the country as the highly opinionated "Fabulous Sports Babe," shows her true toughness with her winning battle against breast cancer. TAMPA FL 1998-12-07 Tampa Bay Times ©Tampa Bay Times / Jock Fistick / The Image Works
Best quality if reproduced no larger than 1/2 page.
Iron in Architecture - Crystal Palace - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows the Crystal Palace at Sydenham Hill, a wealthy suburb in the area of London. It was an enormous glass and iron structure that was built in 1851 for the Great Exhibition held in 1851 in Hyde Park in London. The Exhibition was Prince Albert's idea to showcase the industrial achievements of Great Britain. Other countries, including the United States, Russia, and Egypt exhibited as well.  The Crystal Palace was designed by Sir Joseph Paxton. Shown here is the interior of the high, barre-vaulted transept thatran across the center of the building. It was deisgned to be positioned at 90 degrees to the main gallery and incorporated into it several tall elm trees that otherwise would have been cut down.     © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
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Iron in Architecture - Crystal Palace - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows the Crystal Palace at Sydenham Hill, a wealthy suburb in the area of London. It was an enormous glass and iron structure that was built in 1851 for the Great Exhibition held in 1851 in Hyde Park in London. The Exhibition was Prince Albert's idea to showcase the industrial achievements of Great Britain. Other countries, including the United States, Russia, and Egypt exhibited as well. The Crystal Palace was designed by Sir Joseph Paxton. Shown here is the interior of the high, barre-vaulted transept thatran across the center of the building. It was deisgned to be positioned at 90 degrees to the main gallery and incorporated into it several tall elm trees that otherwise would have been cut down. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Nasymth's Steam Hammer - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows Nasmyth's Steam Hammer. James Nasmyth was a Scottish engineer who gained fame for his development of the steam hammer. He was co-founder of Nasmyth, Gaskell and Company manufacturers of machine tools. With the steam hammer, the steam is admitted below the piston, which is thus raised to any required height within the limits of the stroke. When the communication with the boiler is shut off and the steam below the piston is allowed to escape, the piston, with the mass of ironforming the hammer attached to the piston-rod, falls by its own weight. This weight, in large steam hammers, amounts to several tons; and the force of the blow will depend jointly upon the weight of the hammer, and upon the height from which it is allowed to fall. The steam is admitted and allowed to escape by valves, moved by a lever under the control of a workman.     © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
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Nasymth's Steam Hammer - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows Nasmyth's Steam Hammer. James Nasmyth was a Scottish engineer who gained fame for his development of the steam hammer. He was co-founder of Nasmyth, Gaskell and Company manufacturers of machine tools. With the steam hammer, the steam is admitted below the piston, which is thus raised to any required height within the limits of the stroke. When the communication with the boiler is shut off and the steam below the piston is allowed to escape, the piston, with the mass of ironforming the hammer attached to the piston-rod, falls by its own weight. This weight, in large steam hammers, amounts to several tons; and the force of the blow will depend jointly upon the weight of the hammer, and upon the height from which it is allowed to fall. The steam is admitted and allowed to escape by valves, moved by a lever under the control of a workman. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works

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