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"Fine Art"

The Pretty Baa-Lambs, 1859. Private Collection. © Fine Art Images / Heritage / The Image Works
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The Pretty Baa-Lambs, 1859. Private Collection. © Fine Art Images / Heritage / The Image Works
Korea: 'Valley in Gyeongju', oil on canvas by Lee In-sung (1912 - 1950), 1934, Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art, Seoul - Lee In-sung (1912 - 1950) was a Korean painter based in Daegu. He studied art in Japan, but was heavily influenced by Western Art. He has been dubbed the 'Gauguin of Korea'. Lee was accidentally shot dead by a policeman after returning home drunk one night during curfew.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works Best quality if reproduced no larger than 1/2 page
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Korea: 'Valley in Gyeongju', oil on canvas by Lee In-sung (1912 - 1950), 1934, Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art, Seoul - Lee In-sung (1912 - 1950) was a Korean painter based in Daegu. He studied art in Japan, but was heavily influenced by Western Art. He has been dubbed the 'Gauguin of Korea'. Lee was accidentally shot dead by a policeman after returning home drunk one night during curfew. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Best quality if reproduced no larger than 1/2 page
Bhutan: Mural depicting Dhritarashtra, the god of music and one of the Four Guardian Kings, Punakha Dzong, Punakha, Bhutan, 2015 - The Punakha Dzong, also known as Pungtang Dewa chhenbi Phodrang ('the palace of great happiness or bliss') was built in 1637 - 1638 by the 1st Zhabdrung Rinpoche and founder of the Bhutanese state, Ngawang Namgyal (1594 - 1651). It is the second largest and second oldest dzong (fortress) in Bhutan, located at the confluence of the Pho Chhu (father) and Mo Chhu (mother) rivers in the Punakha-Wangdue valley.  Punakha Dzong is the administrative centre of Punakha District, and once acted as the administrative centre and the seat of Bhutan's government until 1855, when the capital was moved to Thimphu, though it still acts as the winter capital for the head of the Bhutanese clergy. It houses sacred relics from the southern Drukpa Lineage of the Kagyu school of Tibetan Buddhism.  ©Daniel Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Bhutan: Mural depicting Dhritarashtra, the god of music and one of the Four Guardian Kings, Punakha Dzong, Punakha, Bhutan, 2015 - The Punakha Dzong, also known as Pungtang Dewa chhenbi Phodrang ('the palace of great happiness or bliss') was built in 1637 - 1638 by the 1st Zhabdrung Rinpoche and founder of the Bhutanese state, Ngawang Namgyal (1594 - 1651). It is the second largest and second oldest dzong (fortress) in Bhutan, located at the confluence of the Pho Chhu (father) and Mo Chhu (mother) rivers in the Punakha-Wangdue valley.

Punakha Dzong is the administrative centre of Punakha District, and once acted as the administrative centre and the seat of Bhutan's government until 1855, when the capital was moved to Thimphu, though it still acts as the winter capital for the head of the Bhutanese clergy. It houses sacred relics from the southern Drukpa Lineage of the Kagyu school of Tibetan Buddhism. ©Daniel Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Bhutan: Religious mural depicting a contemplative sage, Punakha Dzong, Punakha, Bhutan, 2015 - The Punakha Dzong, also known as Pungtang Dewa chhenbi Phodrang ('the palace of great happiness or bliss') was built in 1637 - 1638 by the 1st Zhabdrung Rinpoche and founder of the Bhutanese state, Ngawang Namgyal (1594 - 1651). It is the second largest and second oldest dzong (fortress) in Bhutan, located at the confluence of the Pho Chhu (father) and Mo Chhu (mother) rivers in the Punakha-Wangdue valley.  Punakha Dzong is the administrative centre of Punakha District, and once acted as the administrative centre and the seat of Bhutan's government until 1855, when the capital was moved to Thimphu, though it still acts as the winter capital for the head of the Bhutanese clergy. It houses sacred relics from the southern Drukpa Lineage of the Kagyu school of Tibetan Buddhism.  ©Daniel Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Bhutan: Religious mural depicting a contemplative sage, Punakha Dzong, Punakha, Bhutan, 2015 - The Punakha Dzong, also known as Pungtang Dewa chhenbi Phodrang ('the palace of great happiness or bliss') was built in 1637 - 1638 by the 1st Zhabdrung Rinpoche and founder of the Bhutanese state, Ngawang Namgyal (1594 - 1651). It is the second largest and second oldest dzong (fortress) in Bhutan, located at the confluence of the Pho Chhu (father) and Mo Chhu (mother) rivers in the Punakha-Wangdue valley.

Punakha Dzong is the administrative centre of Punakha District, and once acted as the administrative centre and the seat of Bhutan's government until 1855, when the capital was moved to Thimphu, though it still acts as the winter capital for the head of the Bhutanese clergy. It houses sacred relics from the southern Drukpa Lineage of the Kagyu school of Tibetan Buddhism. ©Daniel Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Bhutan: Religious mural depicting Vaisravana, King of the North and chief of the Four Guardian Kings, Punakha Dzong, Punakha, Bhutan, 2015 - The Punakha Dzong, also known as Pungtang Dewa chhenbi Phodrang ('the palace of great happiness or bliss') was built in 1637 - 1638 by the 1st Zhabdrung Rinpoche and founder of the Bhutanese state, Ngawang Namgyal (1594 - 1651). It is the second largest and second oldest dzong (fortress) in Bhutan, located at the confluence of the Pho Chhu (father) and Mo Chhu (mother) rivers in the Punakha-Wangdue valley.  Punakha Dzong is the administrative centre of Punakha District, and once acted as the administrative centre and the seat of Bhutan's government until 1855, when the capital was moved to Thimphu, though it still acts as the winter capital for the head of the Bhutanese clergy. It houses sacred relics from the southern Drukpa Lineage of the Kagyu school of Tibetan Buddhism.  ©Daniel Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Bhutan: Religious mural depicting Vaisravana, King of the North and chief of the Four Guardian Kings, Punakha Dzong, Punakha, Bhutan, 2015 - The Punakha Dzong, also known as Pungtang Dewa chhenbi Phodrang ('the palace of great happiness or bliss') was built in 1637 - 1638 by the 1st Zhabdrung Rinpoche and founder of the Bhutanese state, Ngawang Namgyal (1594 - 1651). It is the second largest and second oldest dzong (fortress) in Bhutan, located at the confluence of the Pho Chhu (father) and Mo Chhu (mother) rivers in the Punakha-Wangdue valley.

Punakha Dzong is the administrative centre of Punakha District, and once acted as the administrative centre and the seat of Bhutan's government until 1855, when the capital was moved to Thimphu, though it still acts as the winter capital for the head of the Bhutanese clergy. It houses sacred relics from the southern Drukpa Lineage of the Kagyu school of Tibetan Buddhism. ©Daniel Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Bhutan: Religious mural depicting Dhritarashtra, King of the East and one of the Four Guardian Kings, Punakha Dzong, Punakha, Bhutan, 2015 - The Punakha Dzong, also known as Pungtang Dewa chhenbi Phodrang ('the palace of great happiness or bliss') was built in 1637 - 1638 by the 1st Zhabdrung Rinpoche and founder of the Bhutanese state, Ngawang Namgyal (1594 - 1651). It is the second largest and second oldest dzong (fortress) in Bhutan, located at the confluence of the Pho Chhu (father) and Mo Chhu (mother) rivers in the Punakha-Wangdue valley.  Punakha Dzong is the administrative centre of Punakha District, and once acted as the administrative centre and the seat of Bhutan's government until 1855, when the capital was moved to Thimphu, though it still acts as the winter capital for the head of the Bhutanese clergy. It houses sacred relics from the southern Drukpa Lineage of the Kagyu school of Tibetan Buddhism.  ©Daniel Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Bhutan: Religious mural depicting Dhritarashtra, King of the East and one of the Four Guardian Kings, Punakha Dzong, Punakha, Bhutan, 2015 - The Punakha Dzong, also known as Pungtang Dewa chhenbi Phodrang ('the palace of great happiness or bliss') was built in 1637 - 1638 by the 1st Zhabdrung Rinpoche and founder of the Bhutanese state, Ngawang Namgyal (1594 - 1651). It is the second largest and second oldest dzong (fortress) in Bhutan, located at the confluence of the Pho Chhu (father) and Mo Chhu (mother) rivers in the Punakha-Wangdue valley.

Punakha Dzong is the administrative centre of Punakha District, and once acted as the administrative centre and the seat of Bhutan's government until 1855, when the capital was moved to Thimphu, though it still acts as the winter capital for the head of the Bhutanese clergy. It houses sacred relics from the southern Drukpa Lineage of the Kagyu school of Tibetan Buddhism. ©Daniel Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Bhutan: Religious mural depicting Virupaksa, King of the West and one of the Four Guardian Kings, Punakha Dzong, Punakha, Bhutan, 2015 - The Punakha Dzong, also known as Pungtang Dewa chhenbi Phodrang ('the palace of great happiness or bliss') was built in 1637 - 1638 by the 1st Zhabdrung Rinpoche and founder of the Bhutanese state, Ngawang Namgyal (1594 - 1651). It is the second largest and second oldest dzong (fortress) in Bhutan, located at the confluence of the Pho Chhu (father) and Mo Chhu (mother) rivers in the Punakha-Wangdue valley.  Punakha Dzong is the administrative centre of Punakha District, and once acted as the administrative centre and the seat of Bhutan's government until 1855, when the capital was moved to Thimphu, though it still acts as the winter capital for the head of the Bhutanese clergy. It houses sacred relics from the southern Drukpa Lineage of the Kagyu school of Tibetan Buddhism.  ©Daniel Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Bhutan: Religious mural depicting Virupaksa, King of the West and one of the Four Guardian Kings, Punakha Dzong, Punakha, Bhutan, 2015 - The Punakha Dzong, also known as Pungtang Dewa chhenbi Phodrang ('the palace of great happiness or bliss') was built in 1637 - 1638 by the 1st Zhabdrung Rinpoche and founder of the Bhutanese state, Ngawang Namgyal (1594 - 1651). It is the second largest and second oldest dzong (fortress) in Bhutan, located at the confluence of the Pho Chhu (father) and Mo Chhu (mother) rivers in the Punakha-Wangdue valley.

Punakha Dzong is the administrative centre of Punakha District, and once acted as the administrative centre and the seat of Bhutan's government until 1855, when the capital was moved to Thimphu, though it still acts as the winter capital for the head of the Bhutanese clergy. It houses sacred relics from the southern Drukpa Lineage of the Kagyu school of Tibetan Buddhism. ©Daniel Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Spain: Bullfighting mural on a closed cafe grille, near the Real Maestranza bullring in Seville - Bullfighting, in some form or another, has been present in Spain since Roman times. Seville has played a key role in the development of the controversial bloodsport over the intervening centuries.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Spain: Bullfighting mural on a closed cafe grille, near the Real Maestranza bullring in Seville - Bullfighting, in some form or another, has been present in Spain since Roman times. Seville has played a key role in the development of the controversial bloodsport over the intervening centuries. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Germany: Oil painting of Adolf (1255-1298), King of Germany, by a follower of Arnold Montanus (1625-1683), 1662 - Adolf of Germany (1255-1298), also known as Adolf of Nassau, was the son of Walram II, Count of Nassau, and succeeded his father in 1276. When King Rudolf I died in 1291 without managing to secure the election of his eldest son Albert, Adolf was chosen by the Elector College of imperial princes and bishops, thinking him easy to control and manipulate. He was elected as King of Germany in 1292.  Adolf immediately had to pay and make significant concessions to the electors and archbishops who had given him the crown. Adolf had negligible power and influence within his own empire, but he soon tried to break away from the yoke of the electors and bishops who had elected him, concluding pacts with their opponents and breaking promises made but making sure not to be accused of breaching any contracts signed.  The electors grew increasingly wary of Adolf's policies and moves, which were often not in line with their own interests. They eventually banded together and deposed Adolf, charging him with various crimes and of breaking promises made. Albert I, son of the late King Rudolf I, was elected as the new king in 1298, and killed Adolf in battle when the former king refused to give up his power. Adolf became the first physically and mentally healthy ruler of the Holy Roman Empire to be deposed without a papal excommunication first.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Germany: Oil painting of Adolf (1255-1298), King of Germany, by a follower of Arnold Montanus (1625-1683), 1662 - Adolf of Germany (1255-1298), also known as Adolf of Nassau, was the son of Walram II, Count of Nassau, and succeeded his father in 1276. When King Rudolf I died in 1291 without managing to secure the election of his eldest son Albert, Adolf was chosen by the Elector College of imperial princes and bishops, thinking him easy to control and manipulate. He was elected as King of Germany in 1292.

Adolf immediately had to pay and make significant concessions to the electors and archbishops who had given him the crown. Adolf had negligible power and influence within his own empire, but he soon tried to break away from the yoke of the electors and bishops who had elected him, concluding pacts with their opponents and breaking promises made but making sure not to be accused of breaching any contracts signed.

The electors grew increasingly wary of Adolf's policies and moves, which were often not in line with their own interests. They eventually banded together and deposed Adolf, charging him with various crimes and of breaking promises made. Albert I, son of the late King Rudolf I, was elected as the new king in 1298, and killed Adolf in battle when the former king refused to give up his power. Adolf became the first physically and mentally healthy ruler of the Holy Roman Empire to be deposed without a papal excommunication first. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Germany: Miniature painting depicting Henry II (974-1024), 15th Holy Roman emperor, being presented a manuscript by the scribe Bebo of Seeon Abbey, from the manuscript of St. Gregory's Moralia in Job, 11th century, Bamberg State Library, Bamberg - Henry II (974-1024), also known as Henry IV and Saint Henry, was the son of Henry II, Duke of Bavaria and great-grandson of King Henry I, therefore making him part of the Bavarian branch of the Ottonian dynasty. Due to his father's rebellion against the two previous emperors, Henry was often in exile and became close with the Church. He succeeded his father as Duke of Bavaria in 995, taking the name Henry IV.  As Henry was returning home to claim his lands however, Emperor Otto III died of fever with no heir to succeed him. Political chaos gripped the Holy Roman Empire, and Henry defeated several other claimants to become King of Germany in 1002, and King of Italy in 1004. He subsumed the Duchy of Bohemia into the Holy Roman Empire, and fought a series of wars against Poland. He also led a series of expeditions into Italy to ensure Imperial dominance against secessionist forces and the Byzantine Empire. He was eventually crowned as Holy Roman Emperor in 1014.  Henry II's rule was centralised, power consolidated in his hands through personal and political ties with the Catholic Church, which would lead to his canonisation a century later in 1146, the only German monarch to become a saint. Henry eventually died in 1024, leaving no children behind and ending the Ottonian dynasty.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Germany: Miniature painting depicting Henry II (974-1024), 15th Holy Roman emperor, being presented a manuscript by the scribe Bebo of Seeon Abbey, from the manuscript of St. Gregory's Moralia in Job, 11th century, Bamberg State Library, Bamberg - Henry II (974-1024), also known as Henry IV and Saint Henry, was the son of Henry II, Duke of Bavaria and great-grandson of King Henry I, therefore making him part of the Bavarian branch of the Ottonian dynasty. Due to his father's rebellion against the two previous emperors, Henry was often in exile and became close with the Church. He succeeded his father as Duke of Bavaria in 995, taking the name Henry IV.

As Henry was returning home to claim his lands however, Emperor Otto III died of fever with no heir to succeed him. Political chaos gripped the Holy Roman Empire, and Henry defeated several other claimants to become King of Germany in 1002, and King of Italy in 1004. He subsumed the Duchy of Bohemia into the Holy Roman Empire, and fought a series of wars against Poland. He also led a series of expeditions into Italy to ensure Imperial dominance against secessionist forces and the Byzantine Empire. He was eventually crowned as Holy Roman Emperor in 1014.

Henry II's rule was centralised, power consolidated in his hands through personal and political ties with the Catholic Church, which would lead to his canonisation a century later in 1146, the only German monarch to become a saint. Henry eventually died in 1024, leaving no children behind and ending the Ottonian dynasty. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Germany: Watercolour painting of Otto I (912-973), 12th Holy Roman emperor, by Lucas Cranach the Elder (1472-1553), 1530-1535, Weimar - Otto I (912-973), also known as Otto the Great, was the oldest son of King Henry I and inherited the Duchy of Saxony as well as kingship of East Francia, now also increasingly known as Germany, when his father died in 936. He unified the various duchies into one single kingdom, ensuring more power remained in the king's hands rather than that of the aristocracy, placing members of his family into all the duchies to reduce the power of the dukes, who had previously been co-equals with the king.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Germany: Watercolour painting of Otto I (912-973), 12th Holy Roman emperor, by Lucas Cranach the Elder (1472-1553), 1530-1535, Weimar - Otto I (912-973), also known as Otto the Great, was the oldest son of King Henry I and inherited the Duchy of Saxony as well as kingship of East Francia, now also increasingly known as Germany, when his father died in 936. He unified the various duchies into one single kingdom, ensuring more power remained in the king's hands rather than that of the aristocracy, placing members of his family into all the duchies to reduce the power of the dukes, who had previously been co-equals with the king. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Cuba: Cuban national flag in a mural on a wall of a house in Vinales, Pinar del Rio Province - Viñales, a valley hidden away in the Sierra de los Organos in Western Cuba ranks among the loveliest regions of the country.  The entire northern horizon is dotted with limestone outcrops known locally as mogotes. Geologists explain that during the Cretaceous period around 100 million years ago underground rivers eroded the high land near present-day Viñales, creating great caves which eventually collapsed leaving the spectacular outcrops visible today.  Viñales is really just a small village, with a population of around 5,000 and a single main street. The centre of the town is Iglesia Viñales, a fine colonial church dating from around 1880.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Cuba: Cuban national flag in a mural on a wall of a house in Vinales, Pinar del Rio Province - Viñales, a valley hidden away in the Sierra de los Organos in Western Cuba ranks among the loveliest regions of the country.

The entire northern horizon is dotted with limestone outcrops known locally as mogotes. Geologists explain that during the Cretaceous period around 100 million years ago underground rivers eroded the high land near present-day Viñales, creating great caves which eventually collapsed leaving the spectacular outcrops visible today.

Viñales is really just a small village, with a population of around 5,000 and a single main street. The centre of the town is Iglesia Viñales, a fine colonial church dating from around 1880. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Cuba: Tobacco worker, Cuban art for sale in Vinales, Pinar del Rio Province - Viñales, a valley hidden away in the Sierra de los Organos in Western Cuba ranks among the loveliest regions of the country.  The entire northern horizon is dotted with limestone outcrops known locally as mogotes. Geologists explain that during the Cretaceous period around 100 million years ago underground rivers eroded the high land near present-day Viñales, creating great caves which eventually collapsed leaving the spectacular outcrops visible today.  Viñales is really just a small village, with a population of around 5,000 and a single main street. The centre of the town is Iglesia Viñales, a fine colonial church dating from around 1880.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Cuba: Tobacco worker, Cuban art for sale in Vinales, Pinar del Rio Province - Viñales, a valley hidden away in the Sierra de los Organos in Western Cuba ranks among the loveliest regions of the country.

The entire northern horizon is dotted with limestone outcrops known locally as mogotes. Geologists explain that during the Cretaceous period around 100 million years ago underground rivers eroded the high land near present-day Viñales, creating great caves which eventually collapsed leaving the spectacular outcrops visible today.

Viñales is really just a small village, with a population of around 5,000 and a single main street. The centre of the town is Iglesia Viñales, a fine colonial church dating from around 1880. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Cuba: Cuban art for sale on the street in Vinales, Pinar del Rio Province - Viñales, a valley hidden away in the Sierra de los Organos in Western Cuba ranks among the loveliest regions of the country.  The entire northern horizon is dotted with limestone outcrops known locally as mogotes. Geologists explain that during the Cretaceous period around 100 million years ago underground rivers eroded the high land near present-day Viñales, creating great caves which eventually collapsed leaving the spectacular outcrops visible today.  Viñales is really just a small village, with a population of around 5,000 and a single main street. The centre of the town is Iglesia Viñales, a fine colonial church dating from around 1880.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Cuba: Cuban art for sale on the street in Vinales, Pinar del Rio Province - Viñales, a valley hidden away in the Sierra de los Organos in Western Cuba ranks among the loveliest regions of the country.

The entire northern horizon is dotted with limestone outcrops known locally as mogotes. Geologists explain that during the Cretaceous period around 100 million years ago underground rivers eroded the high land near present-day Viñales, creating great caves which eventually collapsed leaving the spectacular outcrops visible today.

Viñales is really just a small village, with a population of around 5,000 and a single main street. The centre of the town is Iglesia Viñales, a fine colonial church dating from around 1880. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Cuba: Cuban art for sale on the street in Vinales, Pinar del Rio Province - Viñales, a valley hidden away in the Sierra de los Organos in Western Cuba ranks among the loveliest regions of the country.  The entire northern horizon is dotted with limestone outcrops known locally as mogotes. Geologists explain that during the Cretaceous period around 100 million years ago underground rivers eroded the high land near present-day Viñales, creating great caves which eventually collapsed leaving the spectacular outcrops visible today.  Viñales is really just a small village, with a population of around 5,000 and a single main street. The centre of the town is Iglesia Viñales, a fine colonial church dating from around 1880.  ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Cuba: Cuban art for sale on the street in Vinales, Pinar del Rio Province - Viñales, a valley hidden away in the Sierra de los Organos in Western Cuba ranks among the loveliest regions of the country.

The entire northern horizon is dotted with limestone outcrops known locally as mogotes. Geologists explain that during the Cretaceous period around 100 million years ago underground rivers eroded the high land near present-day Viñales, creating great caves which eventually collapsed leaving the spectacular outcrops visible today.

Viñales is really just a small village, with a population of around 5,000 and a single main street. The centre of the town is Iglesia Viñales, a fine colonial church dating from around 1880. ©David Henley/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Germany: Frederick I (1122-1190), 20th Holy Roman emperor, oil painting by Bernardo Cane, 16th century, Legal Archive District of Pavia, Pavia - Frederick I (1122-1190), also known as Frederick Barbarossa, was the nephew of German king Conrad III, and became Duke of Swabia in 1147. When Conrad died in 1152, he named Frederick as his successor on his deathbed, rather than his own son, Frederick IV of Swabia. He was later crowned King of Italy and Holy Roman emperor in 1155, as well as being proclaimed King of Burgundy in 1178.  Frederick was given the name Barbarossa ('red beard') by the northern Italian cities he attempted to conquer, waging six campaigns in all to subsume Italy, struggling constantly with the various popes and interference from the Byzantine Empire. Frederick embarked on the Third Crusade in 1189, after his sixth and final Italian expedition ended in success, a massive campaign in conjunction with the French King Philip Augustus and the English King Richard the Lionheart.<br/   Before Frederick even arrived in Jerusalem however, he drowned in the Saleph river in 1190, leaving the German army in a state of chaos and ultimately leading to the dissolution of the Crusader army. He was considered an exceptionally charismatic leader and one of the Holy Roman Empire's greatest mediaeval emperors, with his contributions including the reestablishment of the 'Corpus Juris Civilis' (Roman rule of law). His qualities were considered almost superhuman by some, his ambition, longevity, organisational skills, battlefield acumen and political perspicuity all adding to his reputation.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Germany: Frederick I (1122-1190), 20th Holy Roman emperor, oil painting by Bernardo Cane, 16th century, Legal Archive District of Pavia, Pavia - Frederick I (1122-1190), also known as Frederick Barbarossa, was the nephew of German king Conrad III, and became Duke of Swabia in 1147. When Conrad died in 1152, he named Frederick as his successor on his deathbed, rather than his own son, Frederick IV of Swabia. He was later crowned King of Italy and Holy Roman emperor in 1155, as well as being proclaimed King of Burgundy in 1178.

Frederick was given the name Barbarossa ('red beard') by the northern Italian cities he attempted to conquer, waging six campaigns in all to subsume Italy, struggling constantly with the various popes and interference from the Byzantine Empire. Frederick embarked on the Third Crusade in 1189, after his sixth and final Italian expedition ended in success, a massive campaign in conjunction with the French King Philip Augustus and the English King Richard the Lionheart.<br/

Before Frederick even arrived in Jerusalem however, he drowned in the Saleph river in 1190, leaving the German army in a state of chaos and ultimately leading to the dissolution of the Crusader army. He was considered an exceptionally charismatic leader and one of the Holy Roman Empire's greatest mediaeval emperors, with his contributions including the reestablishment of the 'Corpus Juris Civilis' (Roman rule of law). His qualities were considered almost superhuman by some, his ambition, longevity, organisational skills, battlefield acumen and political perspicuity all adding to his reputation. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Japan: 'Farmhouses', oil on canvas by Shigeru Aoki (1882-1911), 1904, Ishibashi Museum of Art, Kurume - Shigeru Aoki (1882-1911) was a Japanese painter famed for his combining of Japanese mythology and legends with the Western-style art movement that could be found in some late 19th and early 20th century Japanese paintings.  Aoki was born into an ex-samurai household in northern Kyushu. He left his home in 1899 to pursue artistic studies in Tokyo, and soon began to accumulate critical acclaim for his artwork and its use of Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood techniques mixed with Kojiki themes. He died in March 1911 from tuberculosis, aged only 28.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Japan: 'Farmhouses', oil on canvas by Shigeru Aoki (1882-1911), 1904, Ishibashi Museum of Art, Kurume - Shigeru Aoki (1882-1911) was a Japanese painter famed for his combining of Japanese mythology and legends with the Western-style art movement that could be found in some late 19th and early 20th century Japanese paintings.

Aoki was born into an ex-samurai household in northern Kyushu. He left his home in 1899 to pursue artistic studies in Tokyo, and soon began to accumulate critical acclaim for his artwork and its use of Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood techniques mixed with Kojiki themes. He died in March 1911 from tuberculosis, aged only 28. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Afghanistan: The British Army entering the Bolan Pass from Dadur, First Anglo-Afghan War, 1838 - 1842, lithograph from painting by James Atkinson (1780 - 1852) - The First Anglo-Afghan War was fought between British India and Afghanistan from 1839 to 1842. It was one of the first major conflicts during the Great Game, the 19th century competition for power and influence in Central Asia between the United Kingdom and Russia, and also marked one of the worst setbacks inflicted on British power in the region after the consolidation of the British Raj by the East India Company.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Afghanistan: The British Army entering the Bolan Pass from Dadur, First Anglo-Afghan War, 1838 - 1842, lithograph from painting by James Atkinson (1780 - 1852) - The First Anglo-Afghan War was fought between British India and Afghanistan from 1839 to 1842. It was one of the first major conflicts during the Great Game, the 19th century competition for power and influence in Central Asia between the United Kingdom and Russia, and also marked one of the worst setbacks inflicted on British power in the region after the consolidation of the British Raj by the East India Company. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Afghanistan: Dance of Sufi Dervishes by Kamal ud-Din Behzad (c. 1450 - c. 1535), late 15th century - A Dervish is someone treading a Sufi Muslim ascetic path or Tariqah, known (notionally) for their extreme poverty and austerity, similar to mendicant friars in Christianity or Hindu / Buddhist / Jain sadhus.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Persia / Afghanistan: Dance of Sufi Dervishes by Kamal ud-Din Behzad (c. 1450 - c. 1535), late 15th century - A Dervish is someone treading a Sufi Muslim ascetic path or Tariqah, known (notionally) for their extreme poverty and austerity, similar to mendicant friars in Christianity or Hindu / Buddhist / Jain sadhus. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Pictography, Rock Painting, Pictograms, despicting hunting scenes, antropomorphic and zoomorphic figures, symbols and other graphics. Located in the rainforest of Faical, San Ignacio Province, Cajamarca, Peru. Discovered by Walter Alarcon. Dated around 5000 BC with approximately 1164 images on solid rock. © Luis Rosendo / Heritage / The Image Works
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Pictography, Rock Painting, Pictograms, despicting hunting scenes, antropomorphic and zoomorphic figures, symbols and other graphics. Located in the rainforest of Faical, San Ignacio Province, Cajamarca, Peru. Discovered by Walter Alarcon. Dated around 5000 BC with approximately 1164 images on solid rock. © Luis Rosendo / Heritage / The Image Works
Pictography, Rock Painting, Pictograms, despicting hunting scenes, antropomorphic and zoomorphic figures, symbols and other graphics. Located in the rainforest of Faical, San Ignacio Province, Cajamarca, Peru. Discovered by Walter Alarcon. Dated around 5000 BC with approximately 1164 images on solid rock. © Luis Rosendo / Heritage / The Image Works
EHIP2707099.jpg
Pictography, Rock Painting, Pictograms, despicting hunting scenes, antropomorphic and zoomorphic figures, symbols and other graphics. Located in the rainforest of Faical, San Ignacio Province, Cajamarca, Peru. Discovered by Walter Alarcon. Dated around 5000 BC with approximately 1164 images on solid rock. © Luis Rosendo / Heritage / The Image Works
Pictography, Rock Painting, Pictograms, despicting hunting scenes, antropomorphic and zoomorphic figures, symbols and other graphics. Located in the rainforest of Faical, San Ignacio Province, Cajamarca, Peru. Discovered by Walter Alarcon. Dated around 5000 BC with approximately 1164 images on solid rock. © Luis Rosendo / Heritage / The Image Works
EHIP2707070.jpg
Pictography, Rock Painting, Pictograms, despicting hunting scenes, antropomorphic and zoomorphic figures, symbols and other graphics. Located in the rainforest of Faical, San Ignacio Province, Cajamarca, Peru. Discovered by Walter Alarcon. Dated around 5000 BC with approximately 1164 images on solid rock. © Luis Rosendo / Heritage / The Image Works
Pictography, Rock Painting, Pictograms, despicting hunting scenes, antropomorphic and zoomorphic figures, symbols and other graphics. Located in the rainforest of Faical, San Ignacio Province, Cajamarca, Peru. Discovered by Walter Alarcon. Dated around 5000 BC with approximately 1164 images on solid rock. © Luis Rosendo / Heritage / The Image Works
EHIP2707023.jpg
Pictography, Rock Painting, Pictograms, despicting hunting scenes, antropomorphic and zoomorphic figures, symbols and other graphics. Located in the rainforest of Faical, San Ignacio Province, Cajamarca, Peru. Discovered by Walter Alarcon. Dated around 5000 BC with approximately 1164 images on solid rock. © Luis Rosendo / Heritage / The Image Works
Pictography, Rock Painting, Pictograms, despicting hunting scenes, antropomorphic and zoomorphic figures, symbols and other graphics. Located in the rainforest of Faical, San Ignacio Province, Cajamarca, Peru. Discovered by Walter Alarcon. Dated around 5000 BC with approximately 1164 images on solid rock. © Luis Rosendo / Heritage / The Image Works
EHIP2707022.jpg
Pictography, Rock Painting, Pictograms, despicting hunting scenes, antropomorphic and zoomorphic figures, symbols and other graphics. Located in the rainforest of Faical, San Ignacio Province, Cajamarca, Peru. Discovered by Walter Alarcon. Dated around 5000 BC with approximately 1164 images on solid rock. © Luis Rosendo / Heritage / The Image Works
Pictography, Rock Painting, Pictograms, despicting hunting scenes, antropomorphic and zoomorphic figures, symbols and other graphics. Located in the rainforest of Faical, San Ignacio Province, Cajamarca, Peru. Discovered by Walter Alarcon. Dated around 5000 BC with approximately 1164 images on solid rock. © Luis Rosendo / Heritage / The Image Works
EHIP2707004.jpg
Pictography, Rock Painting, Pictograms, despicting hunting scenes, antropomorphic and zoomorphic figures, symbols and other graphics. Located in the rainforest of Faical, San Ignacio Province, Cajamarca, Peru. Discovered by Walter Alarcon. Dated around 5000 BC with approximately 1164 images on solid rock. © Luis Rosendo / Heritage / The Image Works

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