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"Fine Art"

'Resolution' and 'Discovery' in Ship Cove, Nootka Sound The son of a Swiss sculptor, Webber studied in Berne and Paris before entering the Royal Academy Schools in 1775. The following year, however, he went as the official artist on Captain Cook's third voyage to the South Seas. Many of the resulting drawings were engraved for the Admiralty's account of the expedition, published in 1784. This large, typically detailed drawing depicts Nootka Sound on what is now Vancouver Island. The ships anchored there for a refit in April 1778 and observations were made using the tents and instruments which can be seen in the centre of the drawing. This is one of the very large 'roll' drawings drawings done by both Hodges on the second voyage and Webber for the Admiralty and the only one in the NMM collection of this size. © National Maritime Museum, London / The Image Works
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'Resolution' and 'Discovery' in Ship Cove, Nootka Sound The son of a Swiss sculptor, Webber studied in Berne and Paris before entering the Royal Academy Schools in 1775. The following year, however, he went as the official artist on Captain Cook's third voyage to the South Seas. Many of the resulting drawings were engraved for the Admiralty's account of the expedition, published in 1784. This large, typically detailed drawing depicts Nootka Sound on what is now Vancouver Island. The ships anchored there for a refit in April 1778 and observations were made using the tents and instruments which can be seen in the centre of the drawing. This is one of the very large 'roll' drawings drawings done by both Hodges on the second voyage and Webber for the Admiralty and the only one in the NMM collection of this size. © National Maritime Museum, London / The Image Works
Paris, France:  Adam the Younger also known as Nicolas Sébastien Adam. "Bas-relief of La Folie Bouexière: Apollo and Daphne metamorphosed in laure.  © Musée Carnavalet / Roger-Viollet/ The Image Works
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Paris, France: Adam the Younger also known as Nicolas Sébastien Adam. "Bas-relief of La Folie Bouexière: Apollo and Daphne metamorphosed in laure. © Musée Carnavalet / Roger-Viollet/ The Image Works
Frédéric Chopin ( 1810-1849 ), Polish composer of French origin, by Ary Scheffer. Museum of Versailles.  1830  © Roger-Viollet / The Image Works
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Frédéric Chopin ( 1810-1849 ), Polish composer of French origin, by Ary Scheffer. Museum of Versailles. 1830 © Roger-Viollet / The Image Works
Giovanni Antonio Pellegrini, known as Gianantonio. Sketch for the ceiling of the Royal Bank in Paris: "Unloading on the Seine of goods from Louisiana". Oil on canvas, 1720. Musée des Beaux-Arts de la Ville de Paris, Petit Palais. © Julien Vidal / Petit Palais / Roger-Viollet / The Image Works
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Giovanni Antonio Pellegrini, known as Gianantonio. Sketch for the ceiling of the Royal Bank in Paris: "Unloading on the Seine of goods from Louisiana". Oil on canvas, 1720. Musée des Beaux-Arts de la Ville de Paris, Petit Palais. © Julien Vidal / Petit Palais / Roger-Viollet / The Image Works
Athens (Greece), Parthenon on the Acropolis.-Top: Parthenon frieze (marble; 447-422 BC. Workshop of Phidias). West frieze, detail: horsemen's parade. Middle & bottom: goddesses Aphrodite & Peitho, east gable of th.Parthenon (circle of Phidias 435 BC).-/ Photo & reconstruct.aft. polychromy (watercol.by P.Connolly). Museum: British Museum. Year of event: -447. Year of work: 1985. ©akg-images / Peter Connolly / The Image Works
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Athens (Greece), Parthenon on the Acropolis.-Top: Parthenon frieze (marble; 447-422 BC. Workshop of Phidias). West frieze, detail: horsemen's parade. Middle & bottom: goddesses Aphrodite & Peitho, east gable of th.Parthenon (circle of Phidias 435 BC).-/ Photo & reconstruct.aft. polychromy (watercol.by P.Connolly).
Museum: British Museum. Year of event: -447. Year of work: 1985. ©akg-images / Peter Connolly / The Image Works
Indian dancer in traditional clothes accompanied by two musicians autochrome  c1910. India. ©Alinari Archives / The Image Works
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Indian dancer in traditional clothes accompanied by two musicians autochrome c1910. India. ©Alinari Archives / The Image Works
Nevelson, Louise (nee Berliavsky). US-American paintress, graphic artist & sculptress of Russian origin; 23.9.1899 (or 1900) Kiev – 17.4.1987 New York.  Louise Nevelson on the roof terrace of her house in New York City.  Photo, 1966.  © Daniel Frasnay / akg-images / The Image Works For editorial use only Please note:  Photo must be credited with full name of photographer, Daniel Frasnay the image may not be cropped and/or manipulated in any way.
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Nevelson, Louise (nee Berliavsky). US-American paintress, graphic artist & sculptress of Russian origin; 23.9.1899 (or 1900) Kiev – 17.4.1987 New York. Louise Nevelson on the roof terrace of her house in New York City. Photo, 1966.
© Daniel Frasnay / akg-images / The Image Works
For editorial use only
Please note: Photo must be credited with full name of photographer, Daniel Frasnay the image may not be cropped and/or manipulated in any way.
IBN BUTLAN, Abu-l Hasan al-Mujtar (c. 1001 - 1066). Nestorian Christian physician and philosopher of Baghdad. Folio 87v. Illustration about the nuts, useful against inflammation toothache and as antidote. Codex C-67 of Granada with fragment of medieval handbook on health and wellness based on the treaty Taqwin al-sihha (Tables of Health) of 11th century by Ibn Butlan. Codex Granatensis: Tacuinum Sanitatis. 1400. Gothic art. Miniature Painting. SPAIN. ANDALUSIA. Granada. Granada University Library.  © J. Bedmar/Iberfoto / The Image Works
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IBN BUTLAN, Abu-l Hasan al-Mujtar (c. 1001 - 1066). Nestorian Christian physician and philosopher of Baghdad. Folio 87v. Illustration about the nuts, useful against inflammation toothache and as antidote. Codex C-67 of Granada with fragment of medieval handbook on health and wellness based on the treaty Taqwin al-sihha (Tables of Health) of 11th century by Ibn Butlan. Codex Granatensis: Tacuinum Sanitatis. 1400. Gothic art. Miniature Painting. SPAIN. ANDALUSIA. Granada. Granada University Library. © J. Bedmar/Iberfoto / The Image Works
China: Sogdian man wearing a hat and face veil, a camel rider or possibly a Zoroastrian priest, fired clay, Tang Dynasty, 8th Century, Museum of Oriental Art, Turin / Torino - An 8th-century Tang dynasty Chinese clay figurine of a Sogdian man wearing a distinctive cap and face veil, possibly a Zoroastrian priest engaging in a ritual at a fire temple, since face veils were used to avoid contaminating the holy fire with breath or saliva.  Alternatively, from the posture, the figurine may represent a Sogdian camel rider on the Silk Road covering his mouth and nose against the sandstorms of the Taklamakan Desert in Xinjiang.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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China: Sogdian man wearing a hat and face veil, a camel rider or possibly a Zoroastrian priest, fired clay, Tang Dynasty, 8th Century, Museum of Oriental Art, Turin / Torino - An 8th-century Tang dynasty Chinese clay figurine of a Sogdian man wearing a distinctive cap and face veil, possibly a Zoroastrian priest engaging in a ritual at a fire temple, since face veils were used to avoid contaminating the holy fire with breath or saliva.

Alternatively, from the posture, the figurine may represent a Sogdian camel rider on the Silk Road covering his mouth and nose against the sandstorms of the Taklamakan Desert in Xinjiang. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy / Byzantium: Justinian I (c. 482 - 565), Emperor of Byzantium (527 - 565), mosaic, Basilica of San Vitale, Ravenna, 547 CE - Justinian I (c. 482 – 14 November 565), traditionally known as Justinian the Great and also Saint Justinian the Great in the Eastern Orthodox Church, was Byzantine (Eastern Roman) emperor from 527 to 565.  During his reign, Justinian sought to revive the empire's greatness and reconquer the lost western half of the historical Roman Empire. His rule constitutes a distinct epoch in the history of the Later Roman empire, and his reign is marked by the ambitious but only partly realized restoration of the empire.  ©Petar Milosevic/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy / Byzantium: Justinian I (c. 482 - 565), Emperor of Byzantium (527 - 565), mosaic, Basilica of San Vitale, Ravenna, 547 CE - Justinian I (c. 482 – 14 November 565), traditionally known as Justinian the Great and also Saint Justinian the Great in the Eastern Orthodox Church, was Byzantine (Eastern Roman) emperor from 527 to 565.

During his reign, Justinian sought to revive the empire's greatness and reconquer the lost western half of the historical Roman Empire. His rule constitutes a distinct epoch in the history of the Later Roman empire, and his reign is marked by the ambitious but only partly realized restoration of the empire. ©Petar Milosevic/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Japan: Scenes from the Nakamura Kabuki Theatre (detail), one from a pair of six-panel byobu folding screens; ink and color on gold-leafed paper, Moronobu Hishikawa (1618-1694), c. 1670-1680 - Hishikawa Moronobu (1618 – 25 July 1694) was a Japanese artist known for popularizing the ukiyo-e genre of woodblock prints and paintings in the late 17th century.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Japan: Scenes from the Nakamura Kabuki Theatre (detail), one from a pair of six-panel byobu folding screens; ink and color on gold-leafed paper, Moronobu Hishikawa (1618-1694), c. 1670-1680 - Hishikawa Moronobu (1618 – 25 July 1694) was a Japanese artist known for popularizing the ukiyo-e genre of woodblock prints and paintings in the late 17th century. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Bust of Severus Alexander (208-235 CE), 26th Roman emperor, c. 222-235 CE. Musei Capitolini, Rome - Severus Alexander (208-235 CE) was cousin to Emperor Elagabalus, and his heir apparent. When Elagabalus was assassinated in 222 CE, the fourteen-year-old became emperor, under the auspice of his grandmother Julia Maesa, who had arranged for Alexander's accession just as she had done with Elagabalus before him.  Alexander quickly did much to correct the domestic troubles Elagabalus had caused, cleaning up the image of the imperial throne and improving the morals and dignity of the state. His reign was considered prosperous, but militarily, the Empire was faced against the rising threat of the Sassanid Empire in the east, as well as the tribes of Germania. It was during his campaign against the latter that Alexander would meet his end. His attempts to negotiate peace with the Germanic tribes through bribery and diplomacy alienated many in the Roman Army, and ultimately led to his assassination in 235 CE.  His death saw the end of the Severan dynasty and marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, which resulted in nearly 50 years of civil wars, foreign invasions and economic collapse throughout the Empire.  ©Marie-Lan Nguyen/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Bust of Severus Alexander (208-235 CE), 26th Roman emperor, c. 222-235 CE. Musei Capitolini, Rome - Severus Alexander (208-235 CE) was cousin to Emperor Elagabalus, and his heir apparent. When Elagabalus was assassinated in 222 CE, the fourteen-year-old became emperor, under the auspice of his grandmother Julia Maesa, who had arranged for Alexander's accession just as she had done with Elagabalus before him.

Alexander quickly did much to correct the domestic troubles Elagabalus had caused, cleaning up the image of the imperial throne and improving the morals and dignity of the state. His reign was considered prosperous, but militarily, the Empire was faced against the rising threat of the Sassanid Empire in the east, as well as the tribes of Germania. It was during his campaign against the latter that Alexander would meet his end. His attempts to negotiate peace with the Germanic tribes through bribery and diplomacy alienated many in the Roman Army, and ultimately led to his assassination in 235 CE.

His death saw the end of the Severan dynasty and marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, which resulted in nearly 50 years of civil wars, foreign invasions and economic collapse throughout the Empire. ©Marie-Lan Nguyen/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Marble bust of Severus Alexander (208-235 CE), 26th Roman emperor, c. 226-235 CE. Louvre Museum, Paris - Severus Alexander (208-235 CE) was cousin to Emperor Elagabalus, and his heir apparent. When Elagabalus was assassinated in 222 CE, the fourteen-year-old became emperor, under the auspice of his grandmother Julia Maesa, who had arranged for Alexander's accession just as she had done with Elagabalus before him.  Alexander quickly did much to correct the domestic troubles Elagabalus had caused, cleaning up the image of the imperial throne and improving the morals and dignity of the state. His reign was considered prosperous, but militarily, the Empire was faced against the rising threat of the Sassanid Empire in the east, as well as the tribes of Germania. It was during his campaign against the latter that Alexander would meet his end. His attempts to negotiate peace with the Germanic tribes through bribery and diplomacy alienated many in the Roman Army, and ultimately led to his assassination in 235 CE.  His death saw the end of the Severan dynasty and marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, which resulted in nearly 50 years of civil wars, foreign invasions and economic collapse throughout the Empire.  ©Marie-Lan Nguyen/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Marble bust of Severus Alexander (208-235 CE), 26th Roman emperor, c. 226-235 CE. Louvre Museum, Paris - Severus Alexander (208-235 CE) was cousin to Emperor Elagabalus, and his heir apparent. When Elagabalus was assassinated in 222 CE, the fourteen-year-old became emperor, under the auspice of his grandmother Julia Maesa, who had arranged for Alexander's accession just as she had done with Elagabalus before him.

Alexander quickly did much to correct the domestic troubles Elagabalus had caused, cleaning up the image of the imperial throne and improving the morals and dignity of the state. His reign was considered prosperous, but militarily, the Empire was faced against the rising threat of the Sassanid Empire in the east, as well as the tribes of Germania. It was during his campaign against the latter that Alexander would meet his end. His attempts to negotiate peace with the Germanic tribes through bribery and diplomacy alienated many in the Roman Army, and ultimately led to his assassination in 235 CE.

His death saw the end of the Severan dynasty and marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, which resulted in nearly 50 years of civil wars, foreign invasions and economic collapse throughout the Empire. ©Marie-Lan Nguyen/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Head from a bronze statue of Severus Alexander (208-235 CE), 26th Roman emperor, c. 222-235 CE. Archaeological Museum of Dion, Greece - Severus Alexander (208-235 CE) was cousin to Emperor Elagabalus, and his heir apparent. When Elagabalus was assassinated in 222 CE, the fourteen-year-old became emperor, under the auspice of his grandmother Julia Maesa, who had arranged for Alexander's accession just as she had done with Elagabalus before him.  Alexander quickly did much to correct the domestic troubles Elagabalus had caused, cleaning up the image of the imperial throne and improving the morals and dignity of the state. His reign was considered prosperous, but militarily, the Empire was faced against the rising threat of the Sassanid Empire in the east, as well as the tribes of Germania. It was during his campaign against the latter that Alexander would meet his end. His attempts to negotiate peace with the Germanic tribes through bribery and diplomacy alienated many in the Roman Army, and ultimately led to his assassination in 235 CE.  His death saw the end of the Severan dynasty and marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, which resulted in nearly 50 years of civil wars, foreign invasions and economic collapse throughout the Empire.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Head from a bronze statue of Severus Alexander (208-235 CE), 26th Roman emperor, c. 222-235 CE. Archaeological Museum of Dion, Greece - Severus Alexander (208-235 CE) was cousin to Emperor Elagabalus, and his heir apparent. When Elagabalus was assassinated in 222 CE, the fourteen-year-old became emperor, under the auspice of his grandmother Julia Maesa, who had arranged for Alexander's accession just as she had done with Elagabalus before him.

Alexander quickly did much to correct the domestic troubles Elagabalus had caused, cleaning up the image of the imperial throne and improving the morals and dignity of the state. His reign was considered prosperous, but militarily, the Empire was faced against the rising threat of the Sassanid Empire in the east, as well as the tribes of Germania. It was during his campaign against the latter that Alexander would meet his end. His attempts to negotiate peace with the Germanic tribes through bribery and diplomacy alienated many in the Roman Army, and ultimately led to his assassination in 235 CE.

His death saw the end of the Severan dynasty and marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, which resulted in nearly 50 years of civil wars, foreign invasions and economic collapse throughout the Empire. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Italy: Marble bust of Severus Alexander (208-235 CE), 26th Roman emperor, 3rd century CE. Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg - Severus Alexander (208-235 CE) was cousin to Emperor Elagabalus, and his heir apparent. When Elagabalus was assassinated in 222 CE, the fourteen-year-old became emperor, under the auspice of his grandmother Julia Maesa, who had arranged for Alexander's accession just as she had done with Elagabalus before him.  Alexander quickly did much to correct the domestic troubles Elagabalus had caused, cleaning up the image of the imperial throne and improving the morals and dignity of the state. His reign was considered prosperous, but militarily, the Empire was faced against the rising threat of the Sassanid Empire in the east, as well as the tribes of Germania. It was during his campaign against the latter that Alexander would meet his end. His attempts to negotiate peace with the Germanic tribes through bribery and diplomacy alienated many in the Roman Army, and ultimately led to his assassination in 235 CE.  His death saw the end of the Severan dynasty and marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, which resulted in nearly 50 years of civil wars, foreign invasions and economic collapse throughout the Empire.  ©George Shuklin/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Italy: Marble bust of Severus Alexander (208-235 CE), 26th Roman emperor, 3rd century CE. Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg - Severus Alexander (208-235 CE) was cousin to Emperor Elagabalus, and his heir apparent. When Elagabalus was assassinated in 222 CE, the fourteen-year-old became emperor, under the auspice of his grandmother Julia Maesa, who had arranged for Alexander's accession just as she had done with Elagabalus before him.

Alexander quickly did much to correct the domestic troubles Elagabalus had caused, cleaning up the image of the imperial throne and improving the morals and dignity of the state. His reign was considered prosperous, but militarily, the Empire was faced against the rising threat of the Sassanid Empire in the east, as well as the tribes of Germania. It was during his campaign against the latter that Alexander would meet his end. His attempts to negotiate peace with the Germanic tribes through bribery and diplomacy alienated many in the Roman Army, and ultimately led to his assassination in 235 CE.

His death saw the end of the Severan dynasty and marked the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century, which resulted in nearly 50 years of civil wars, foreign invasions and economic collapse throughout the Empire. ©George Shuklin/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
China: The Bodhisatta Avalokitesvara (Guanyin) sitting on Mount Potalaka, Song Dynasty limestone statue. Guimet Museum, Paris - Guanyin, short for Guanshiyin, is a bodhisattva in Mahayana Buddhism often associated with compassion and mercy. While she is often portrayed as a woman, she is beyond gender and can be depicted as both male and female.  Guanyin is often referred to as the 'most widely beloved Buddhist Divinity', due to her miraculous powers and her loving compassion. She is not only worshipped in Buddhism, but also in Taoism and Chinese folk religion, with various stories and legends about her. Guanyin plays a very important role in the classic Chinese novel 'Journey to the West.'  She is known by various names in different nations, with the Japanese calling her Kannon/Kwannon, or more formally Kanzeon, while in Thailand she is called Kuan Im. She is extremely popular, with temples dedicated to her found throughout South and East Asia, especially in China and Chinese folk religion.  ©Jean-Pierre Dalbera/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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China: The Bodhisatta Avalokitesvara (Guanyin) sitting on Mount Potalaka, Song Dynasty limestone statue. Guimet Museum, Paris - Guanyin, short for Guanshiyin, is a bodhisattva in Mahayana Buddhism often associated with compassion and mercy. While she is often portrayed as a woman, she is beyond gender and can be depicted as both male and female.

Guanyin is often referred to as the 'most widely beloved Buddhist Divinity', due to her miraculous powers and her loving compassion. She is not only worshipped in Buddhism, but also in Taoism and Chinese folk religion, with various stories and legends about her. Guanyin plays a very important role in the classic Chinese novel 'Journey to the West.'

She is known by various names in different nations, with the Japanese calling her Kannon/Kwannon, or more formally Kanzeon, while in Thailand she is called Kuan Im. She is extremely popular, with temples dedicated to her found throughout South and East Asia, especially in China and Chinese folk religion. ©Jean-Pierre Dalbera/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Germany: Ernst Thalmann (1886 - 1944), leader of the Communist Party of Germany (KPD), c. 1930, oil painting by Paul Beytna (1886 - 1967) - Ernst Thälmann (16 April 1886 – 18 August 1944) was the leader of the Communist Party of Germany (KPD) during much of the Weimar Republic.  He was arrested by the Gestapo in 1933 and held in solitary confinement for eleven years, before being shot in Buchenwald on Adolf Hitler's orders in 1944.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Germany: Ernst Thalmann (1886 - 1944), leader of the Communist Party of Germany (KPD), c. 1930, oil painting by Paul Beytna (1886 - 1967) - Ernst Thälmann (16 April 1886 – 18 August 1944) was the leader of the Communist Party of Germany (KPD) during much of the Weimar Republic.

He was arrested by the Gestapo in 1933 and held in solitary confinement for eleven years, before being shot in Buchenwald on Adolf Hitler's orders in 1944. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Japan: 'Esquisse', charcoal on paper drawing by Shigeru Aoki (1882-1911), 1904 - Shigeru Aoki (1882-1911) was a Japanese painter famed for his combining of Japanese mythology and legends with the Western-style art movement that could be found in some late 19th and early 20th century Japanese paintings.  Aoki was born into an ex-samurai household in northern Kyushu. He left his home in 1899 to pursue artistic studies in Tokyo, and soon began to accumulate critical acclaim for his artwork and its use of Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood techniques mixed with Kojiki themes. He died in March 1911 from tuberculosis, aged only 28.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Japan: 'Esquisse', charcoal on paper drawing by Shigeru Aoki (1882-1911), 1904 - Shigeru Aoki (1882-1911) was a Japanese painter famed for his combining of Japanese mythology and legends with the Western-style art movement that could be found in some late 19th and early 20th century Japanese paintings.

Aoki was born into an ex-samurai household in northern Kyushu. He left his home in 1899 to pursue artistic studies in Tokyo, and soon began to accumulate critical acclaim for his artwork and its use of Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood techniques mixed with Kojiki themes. He died in March 1911 from tuberculosis, aged only 28. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Japan: 'Spring', watercolour painting by Shigeru Aoki (1882-1911), 1904, Ishibashi Museum of Art, Kurume - Shigeru Aoki (1882-1911) was a Japanese painter famed for his combining of Japanese mythology and legends with the Western-style art movement that could be found in some late 19th and early 20th century Japanese paintings.  Aoki was born into an ex-samurai household in northern Kyushu. He left his home in 1899 to pursue artistic studies in Tokyo, and soon began to accumulate critical acclaim for his artwork and its use of Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood techniques mixed with Kojiki themes. He died in March 1911 from tuberculosis, aged only 28.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Japan: 'Spring', watercolour painting by Shigeru Aoki (1882-1911), 1904, Ishibashi Museum of Art, Kurume - Shigeru Aoki (1882-1911) was a Japanese painter famed for his combining of Japanese mythology and legends with the Western-style art movement that could be found in some late 19th and early 20th century Japanese paintings.

Aoki was born into an ex-samurai household in northern Kyushu. He left his home in 1899 to pursue artistic studies in Tokyo, and soon began to accumulate critical acclaim for his artwork and its use of Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood techniques mixed with Kojiki themes. He died in March 1911 from tuberculosis, aged only 28. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Japan: 'Bijinga' (Beautiful Woman), Hasegawa Sadanobu II (1848 - 1940), c. 1880 - Hasegawa Sadanobu Sadanobu II was an ukiyo-e artist of the Utagawa School who flourished during the late Edo and early Meiji Periods.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Japan: 'Bijinga' (Beautiful Woman), Hasegawa Sadanobu II (1848 - 1940), c. 1880 - Hasegawa Sadanobu Sadanobu II was an ukiyo-e artist of the Utagawa School who flourished during the late Edo and early Meiji Periods. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Japan: Imasugata Emakimono or 'Modern Beauty with a Scroll', Yamamoto Shoun (1870-1965), c. 1905 - Yamamoto Shoun (December 30, 1870 - May 10, 1965), who was also known as Matsutani Shoun, was a Japanese print designer, painter, and illustrator. He was born in Kochi into a family of retainers of the Shogun and was given the name Mosaburo. As a teenager, he studied Kano school painting with Yanagimoto Doso and Kawada Shoryu. At about age 17, he moved to Tokyo, where he studied Nanga painting with Taki Katei. At 20 years of age, he was employed as an illustrator for Fugoku Gaho, a pictorial magazine dealing with the sights in and around Tokyo. In his latter career, Shoun primarily produced paintings. He died in 1965, at the age of 96.  In addition to his magazine illustrations, Shoun is best known for his woodblock prints of bijin or 'beautiful women', especially imasugata a kind of precursor to the 'moderngirls / <i>moga</i>' movement of the 1920s and 1930s. Shoun is considered a bridge between the <i>ukiyo-e</i> and <i>shin hanga</i> schools. His career spans the Meiji (1868-1912), Taisho (1912-1926) and Showa (1926-1989) periods.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Japan: Imasugata Emakimono or 'Modern Beauty with a Scroll', Yamamoto Shoun (1870-1965), c. 1905 - Yamamoto Shoun (December 30, 1870 - May 10, 1965), who was also known as Matsutani Shoun, was a Japanese print designer, painter, and illustrator. He was born in Kochi into a family of retainers of the Shogun and was given the name Mosaburo. As a teenager, he studied Kano school painting with Yanagimoto Doso and Kawada Shoryu. At about age 17, he moved to Tokyo, where he studied Nanga painting with Taki Katei. At 20 years of age, he was employed as an illustrator for Fugoku Gaho, a pictorial magazine dealing with the sights in and around Tokyo. In his latter career, Shoun primarily produced paintings. He died in 1965, at the age of 96.

In addition to his magazine illustrations, Shoun is best known for his woodblock prints of bijin or 'beautiful women', especially imasugata a kind of precursor to the 'moderngirls / <i>moga</i>' movement of the 1920s and 1930s. Shoun is considered a bridge between the <i>ukiyo-e</i> and <i>shin hanga</i> schools. His career spans the Meiji (1868-1912), Taisho (1912-1926) and Showa (1926-1989) periods. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Japan: 'Sound of Autumn', oil on canvas painting by Shigeru Aoki (1882-1911), 1908, Fukuoka Art Museum, Fukuoka - Shigeru Aoki (1882-1911) was a Japanese painter famed for his combining of Japanese mythology and legends with the Western-style art movement that could be found in some late 19th and early 20th century Japanese paintings.  Aoki was born into an ex-samurai household in northern Kyushu. He left his home in 1899 to pursue artistic studies in Tokyo, and soon began to accumulate critical acclaim for his artwork and its use of Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood techniques mixed with Kojiki themes. He died in March 1911 from tuberculosis, aged only 28.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Japan: 'Sound of Autumn', oil on canvas painting by Shigeru Aoki (1882-1911), 1908, Fukuoka Art Museum, Fukuoka - Shigeru Aoki (1882-1911) was a Japanese painter famed for his combining of Japanese mythology and legends with the Western-style art movement that could be found in some late 19th and early 20th century Japanese paintings.

Aoki was born into an ex-samurai household in northern Kyushu. He left his home in 1899 to pursue artistic studies in Tokyo, and soon began to accumulate critical acclaim for his artwork and its use of Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood techniques mixed with Kojiki themes. He died in March 1911 from tuberculosis, aged only 28. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Japan: 'Hashimoto Sanai, Samurai Philosopher', Shimada Bokusen (1868 - 1943), c. 1930 - Sanai Hashimoto (April 19, 1834 - November 1, 1859) was a Japanese samurai and loyal supporter of the Emperor during the final days of the Tokugawa Shogunate.  Shimada Bokusen was the son and a pupil of Maruyama school painter Shimada Sekkoku. He studied under Hashimoto Gaho, a member of the Nihon Bijutsuin. A committee member of the Teiten in 1925, he received the Imperial Art Academy Prize in 1942. He specialized in portraits of historical figures, working in a revived yamato-e style.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Japan: 'Hashimoto Sanai, Samurai Philosopher', Shimada Bokusen (1868 - 1943), c. 1930 - Sanai Hashimoto (April 19, 1834 - November 1, 1859) was a Japanese samurai and loyal supporter of the Emperor during the final days of the Tokugawa Shogunate.

Shimada Bokusen was the son and a pupil of Maruyama school painter Shimada Sekkoku. He studied under Hashimoto Gaho, a member of the Nihon Bijutsuin. A committee member of the Teiten in 1925, he received the Imperial Art Academy Prize in 1942. He specialized in portraits of historical figures, working in a revived yamato-e style. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Spain: 'Scene From An Inquisition', oil on panel, Francisco Jode de Goya y Lucientes (1746 - 1828), c. 1815, Real Academia De Bellas Artes De San Fernando, Madrid - The Tribunal of the Holy Office of the Inquisition (Spanish: Tribunal del Santo Oficio de la Inquisicion), commonly known as the Spanish Inquisition (Inquisicion espanola), was established in 1478 by Catholic Monarchs Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabella I of Castile.  The Inquisition was originally intended primarily to ensure the orthodoxy of those who converted from Judaism and Islam. The regulation of the faith of the newly converted was intensified after the royal decrees issued in 1492 and 1502 ordering Jews and Muslims to convert or leave Spain.  The Inquisition was not definitively abolished until 1834, during the reign of Isabella II, after a period of declining influence in the preceding century.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034008.jpg
Spain: 'Scene From An Inquisition', oil on panel, Francisco Jode de Goya y Lucientes (1746 - 1828), c. 1815, Real Academia De Bellas Artes De San Fernando, Madrid - The Tribunal of the Holy Office of the Inquisition (Spanish: Tribunal del Santo Oficio de la Inquisicion), commonly known as the Spanish Inquisition (Inquisicion espanola), was established in 1478 by Catholic Monarchs Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabella I of Castile.

The Inquisition was originally intended primarily to ensure the orthodoxy of those who converted from Judaism and Islam. The regulation of the faith of the newly converted was intensified after the royal decrees issued in 1492 and 1502 ordering Jews and Muslims to convert or leave Spain.

The Inquisition was not definitively abolished until 1834, during the reign of Isabella II, after a period of declining influence in the preceding century. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Spain: 'Auto Da Fe in the Plaza Mayor, Madrid, 1656', oil on canvas, Francisco Rizi (1614 - 1685), 1683, Museo del Prado, Madrid - The Tribunal of the Holy Office of the Inquisition (Spanish: Tribunal del Santo Oficio de la Inquisicion), commonly known as the Spanish Inquisition (Inquisicion espanola), was established in 1478 by Catholic Monarchs Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabella I of Castile.  The Inquisition was originally intended primarily to ensure the orthodoxy of those who converted from Judaism and Islam. The regulation of the faith of the newly converted was intensified after the royal decrees issued in 1492 and 1502 ordering Jews and Muslims to convert or leave Spain.  The Inquisition was not definitively abolished until 1834, during the reign of Isabella II, after a period of declining influence in the preceding century.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034009.jpg
Spain: 'Auto Da Fe in the Plaza Mayor, Madrid, 1656', oil on canvas, Francisco Rizi (1614 - 1685), 1683, Museo del Prado, Madrid - The Tribunal of the Holy Office of the Inquisition (Spanish: Tribunal del Santo Oficio de la Inquisicion), commonly known as the Spanish Inquisition (Inquisicion espanola), was established in 1478 by Catholic Monarchs Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabella I of Castile.

The Inquisition was originally intended primarily to ensure the orthodoxy of those who converted from Judaism and Islam. The regulation of the faith of the newly converted was intensified after the royal decrees issued in 1492 and 1502 ordering Jews and Muslims to convert or leave Spain.

The Inquisition was not definitively abolished until 1834, during the reign of Isabella II, after a period of declining influence in the preceding century. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works

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