• Archives
  • Tools
Layout
Show:
Save

"Illustration"

The figure pictured here, according to Greek mythology, is Apeliotes, god of the southeast wind, which was associated with good rain. Thus in art he was shown carrying fruit and draped in a cloth that concealed flowers or grain. Usually he was shown holding a ship's sternpost because when the wind blew form the southwest into Athens' port harbor of Piraeus, ships could not sail. Zephyrus was the god of the west wind. Zephyrus was the gentlest of the winds and considered a harbinger of springtime. He was pictured with flowers that indicated a mild light breeze. Eurus, or Euros, was the god of the east wind. The folds of his clothes suggested heavy clouds. The Greeks honored eight wind gods. The other four were Boreas (cold north wind), Kaikias (northeast wind), Notos (south wind), and Skiron (northwest wind). © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557842.jpg
The figure pictured here, according to Greek mythology, is Apeliotes, god of the southeast wind, which was associated with good rain. Thus in art he was shown carrying fruit and draped in a cloth that concealed flowers or grain. Usually he was shown holding a ship's sternpost because when the wind blew form the southwest into Athens' port harbor of Piraeus, ships could not sail. Zephyrus was the god of the west wind. Zephyrus was the gentlest of the winds and considered a harbinger of springtime. He was pictured with flowers that indicated a mild light breeze. Eurus, or Euros, was the god of the east wind. The folds of his clothes suggested heavy clouds. The Greeks honored eight wind gods. The other four were Boreas (cold north wind), Kaikias (northeast wind), Notos (south wind), and Skiron (northwest wind). © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
The figure pictured here, according to Greek mythology, is Zephyrus was the god of the west wind. Zephyrus was the gentlest of the winds and considered a harbinger of springtime. He was pictured with flowers that indicated a mild light breeze. The Greeks honored eight wind gods. The others are: Lips, or Livos, the god of the southwest wind. Usually he was shown holding a ship's sternpost because when the wind blew form the southwest into Athens' port harbor of Piraeus, ships could not sail. Eurus, or Euros, was the god of the east wind. The folds of his clothes suggested heavy clouds. Apeliotes was the southeast wind, which was associated with good rain. Thus in art he was shown carrying fruit and draped in a cloth that concealed flowers or grain. The other four were Boreas (cold north wind), Kaikias (northeast wind), Notos (south wind), and Skiron (northwest wind). © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557839.jpg
The figure pictured here, according to Greek mythology, is Zephyrus was the god of the west wind. Zephyrus was the gentlest of the winds and considered a harbinger of springtime. He was pictured with flowers that indicated a mild light breeze. The Greeks honored eight wind gods. The others are: Lips, or Livos, the god of the southwest wind. Usually he was shown holding a ship's sternpost because when the wind blew form the southwest into Athens' port harbor of Piraeus, ships could not sail. Eurus, or Euros, was the god of the east wind. The folds of his clothes suggested heavy clouds. Apeliotes was the southeast wind, which was associated with good rain. Thus in art he was shown carrying fruit and draped in a cloth that concealed flowers or grain. The other four were Boreas (cold north wind), Kaikias (northeast wind), Notos (south wind), and Skiron (northwest wind). © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
The figure pictured here, according to Greek mythology, is Lips, or Livos, s the god of the southwest wind. Usually he was shown holding a ship's sternpost because when the wind blew form the southwest into Athens' port harbor of Piraeus, ships could not sail. The Greeks honored eight wind gods. The others are: Zephyrus was the god of the west wind. Zephyrus was the gentlest of the winds and considered a harbinger of springtime. He was pictured with flowers that indicated a mild light breeze. Eurus, or Euros, was the god of the east wind. The folds of his clothes suggested heavy clouds. Apeliotes was the southeast wind, which was associated with good rain. Thus in art he was shown carrying fruit and draped in a cloth that concealed flowers or grain. The other four were Boreas (cold north wind), Kaikias (northeast wind), Notos (south wind), and Skiron (northwest wind).  © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557840.jpg
The figure pictured here, according to Greek mythology, is Lips, or Livos, s the god of the southwest wind. Usually he was shown holding a ship's sternpost because when the wind blew form the southwest into Athens' port harbor of Piraeus, ships could not sail. The Greeks honored eight wind gods. The others are: Zephyrus was the god of the west wind. Zephyrus was the gentlest of the winds and considered a harbinger of springtime. He was pictured with flowers that indicated a mild light breeze. Eurus, or Euros, was the god of the east wind. The folds of his clothes suggested heavy clouds. Apeliotes was the southeast wind, which was associated with good rain. Thus in art he was shown carrying fruit and draped in a cloth that concealed flowers or grain. The other four were Boreas (cold north wind), Kaikias (northeast wind), Notos (south wind), and Skiron (northwest wind). © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
The figure pictured here, according to Greek mythology, is Eurus, or Euros, the god of the east wind. The folds of his clothes suggested heavy clouds. The others are: Lips, or Livos, the god of the southwest wind. Usually he was shown holding a ship's sternpost because when the wind blew form the southwest into Athens' port harbor of Piraeus, ships could not sail. Zephyrus was the god of the west wind. Zephyrus was the gentlest of the winds and considered a harbinger of springtime. He was pictured with flowers that indicated a mild light breeze. The Greeks honored eight wind gods. Apeliotes was the southeast wind, which was associated with good rain. Thus in art he was shown carrying fruit and draped in a cloth that concealed flowers or grain. The other four were Boreas (cold north wind), Kaikias (northeast wind), Notos (south wind), and Skiron (northwest wind). © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557841.jpg
The figure pictured here, according to Greek mythology, is Eurus, or Euros, the god of the east wind. The folds of his clothes suggested heavy clouds. The others are: Lips, or Livos, the god of the southwest wind. Usually he was shown holding a ship's sternpost because when the wind blew form the southwest into Athens' port harbor of Piraeus, ships could not sail. Zephyrus was the god of the west wind. Zephyrus was the gentlest of the winds and considered a harbinger of springtime. He was pictured with flowers that indicated a mild light breeze. The Greeks honored eight wind gods. Apeliotes was the southeast wind, which was associated with good rain. Thus in art he was shown carrying fruit and draped in a cloth that concealed flowers or grain. The other four were Boreas (cold north wind), Kaikias (northeast wind), Notos (south wind), and Skiron (northwest wind). © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
This illustration dates to the early 1900s and shows the House of the Seven Gables in Salem Massachusetts. The caption reads: A rusty wooden house, with seven acutely-peaked gables, facing towards various points of the compass...and an elm-tree of wide circumference, rooted before the door. Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) was an American novelist and short story writer. His Wonder-Book and Tanglewood Tales are children’s classics. He also wrote The Scarlet Letter, Blithedale Romance, The House of Seven Gables, The Marble Faun. With his superb creation of dark-hued atmosphere, his symbolism, and his blend of realistic detail and romantic-even melodramatic theme, Hawthorne stands as one of America’s top novelists.  © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557835.jpg
This illustration dates to the early 1900s and shows the House of the Seven Gables in Salem Massachusetts. The caption reads: A rusty wooden house, with seven acutely-peaked gables, facing towards various points of the compass...and an elm-tree of wide circumference, rooted before the door. Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) was an American novelist and short story writer. His Wonder-Book and Tanglewood Tales are children’s classics. He also wrote The Scarlet Letter, Blithedale Romance, The House of Seven Gables, The Marble Faun. With his superb creation of dark-hued atmosphere, his symbolism, and his blend of realistic detail and romantic-even melodramatic theme, Hawthorne stands as one of America’s top novelists. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
This illustration dates to the early 1900s and shows the House of the Seven Gables in Salem Massachusetts. The caption reads: A rusty wooden house, with seven acutely-peaked gables, facing towards various points of the compass...and an elm-tree of wide circumference, rooted before the door. Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) was an American novelist and short story writer. His Wonder-Book and Tanglewood Tales are children’s classics. He also wrote The Scarlet Letter, Blithedale Romance, The House of Seven Gables, The Marble Faun. With his superb creation of dark-hued atmosphere, his symbolism, and his blend of realistic detail and romantic-even melodramatic theme, Hawthorne stands as one of America’s top novelists.  © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557836.jpg
This illustration dates to the early 1900s and shows the House of the Seven Gables in Salem Massachusetts. The caption reads: A rusty wooden house, with seven acutely-peaked gables, facing towards various points of the compass...and an elm-tree of wide circumference, rooted before the door. Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) was an American novelist and short story writer. His Wonder-Book and Tanglewood Tales are children’s classics. He also wrote The Scarlet Letter, Blithedale Romance, The House of Seven Gables, The Marble Faun. With his superb creation of dark-hued atmosphere, his symbolism, and his blend of realistic detail and romantic-even melodramatic theme, Hawthorne stands as one of America’s top novelists. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
This illustration dates to the early 1900s and shows Hilda with doves, The tale of Hilda is found in Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Marble Faun, also known as The Romance of Monte Beni. The caption reads: They soon became familiar with the fairhaired Saxon girl as if she were a born sister of their brood. - Transformation. Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) was an American novelist and short story writer. His Wonder-Book and Tanglewood Tales are children’s classics. He also wrote The Scarlet Letter, Blithedale Romance, The House of Seven Gables, The Marble Faun. With his superb creation of dark-hued atmosphere, his symbolism, and his blend of realistic detail and romantic-even melodramatic theme, Hawthorne stands as one of America’s top novelists.  © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557837.jpg
This illustration dates to the early 1900s and shows Hilda with doves, The tale of Hilda is found in Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Marble Faun, also known as The Romance of Monte Beni. The caption reads: They soon became familiar with the fairhaired Saxon girl as if she were a born sister of their brood. - Transformation. Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) was an American novelist and short story writer. His Wonder-Book and Tanglewood Tales are children’s classics. He also wrote The Scarlet Letter, Blithedale Romance, The House of Seven Gables, The Marble Faun. With his superb creation of dark-hued atmosphere, his symbolism, and his blend of realistic detail and romantic-even melodramatic theme, Hawthorne stands as one of America’s top novelists. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
This illustration dates to the early 1900s and shows Hilda with doves, The tale of Hilda is found in Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Marble Faun, also known as The Romance of Monte Beni. The caption reads: They soon became familiar with the fairhaired Saxon girl as if she were a born sister of their brood. - Transformation. Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) was an American novelist and short story writer. His Wonder-Book and Tanglewood Tales are children’s classics. He also wrote The Scarlet Letter, Blithedale Romance, The House of Seven Gables, The Marble Faun. With his superb creation of dark-hued atmosphere, his symbolism, and his blend of realistic detail and romantic-even melodramatic theme, Hawthorne stands as one of America’s top novelists.  © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557838.jpg
This illustration dates to the early 1900s and shows Hilda with doves, The tale of Hilda is found in Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Marble Faun, also known as The Romance of Monte Beni. The caption reads: They soon became familiar with the fairhaired Saxon girl as if she were a born sister of their brood. - Transformation. Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) was an American novelist and short story writer. His Wonder-Book and Tanglewood Tales are children’s classics. He also wrote The Scarlet Letter, Blithedale Romance, The House of Seven Gables, The Marble Faun. With his superb creation of dark-hued atmosphere, his symbolism, and his blend of realistic detail and romantic-even melodramatic theme, Hawthorne stands as one of America’s top novelists. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
This illustrations dates to the early 1900s and shows Hester Prynne from Nathaniel Hawthorne's Scarlet Letter. The caption reads: Hester Prynne - The point which drew all eyes, and, as it were, transfigured thw wearer...was the Scarlet Letter so fantastically embroidered, illuminated upon her bosom. Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) was an American novelist and short story writer. His Wonder-Book and Tanglewood Tales are children’s classics. He also wrote The Scarlet Letter, Blithedale Romance, The House of Seven Gables, The Marble Faun. With his superb creation of dark-hued atmosphere, his symbolism, and his blend of realistic detail and romantic-even melodramatic theme, Hawthorne stands as one of America’s top novelists.  © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557833.jpg
This illustrations dates to the early 1900s and shows Hester Prynne from Nathaniel Hawthorne's Scarlet Letter. The caption reads: Hester Prynne - The point which drew all eyes, and, as it were, transfigured thw wearer...was the Scarlet Letter so fantastically embroidered, illuminated upon her bosom. Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) was an American novelist and short story writer. His Wonder-Book and Tanglewood Tales are children’s classics. He also wrote The Scarlet Letter, Blithedale Romance, The House of Seven Gables, The Marble Faun. With his superb creation of dark-hued atmosphere, his symbolism, and his blend of realistic detail and romantic-even melodramatic theme, Hawthorne stands as one of America’s top novelists. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
This illustration dates to the early 1900s and shows a witch and a lady in the woods. The scene is from Nathaniel Hawthorne's Twice-Told Tales and the tale is The Hollow of the Three Hills. The caption reads: When the old woman stirred the kneeling lady she lifted not her head. 'Here has been a sweet hour's spot," said the withered crone, chuckling to herself.  © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557834.jpg
This illustration dates to the early 1900s and shows a witch and a lady in the woods. The scene is from Nathaniel Hawthorne's Twice-Told Tales and the tale is The Hollow of the Three Hills. The caption reads: When the old woman stirred the kneeling lady she lifted not her head. 'Here has been a sweet hour's spot," said the withered crone, chuckling to herself. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
This illustration dates to the early 1900s and shows Peter Goldthwaite from Nathaniel Hawthorne's short story titled "Peter Goldthwaite's Treasure." The caption reads: He uplifted the axe, and laid about him so vigorously that the dust flew, the boards crashed.Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) was an American novelist and short story writer. His Wonder-Book and Tanglewood Tales are children’s classics. He also wrote The Scarlet Letter, Blithedale Romance, The House of Seven Gables, The Marble Faun. With his superb creation of dark-hued atmosphere, his symbolism, and his blend of realistic detail and romantic-even melodramatic theme, Hawthorne stands as one of America’s top novelists.  © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557829.jpg
This illustration dates to the early 1900s and shows Peter Goldthwaite from Nathaniel Hawthorne's short story titled "Peter Goldthwaite's Treasure." The caption reads: He uplifted the axe, and laid about him so vigorously that the dust flew, the boards crashed.Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) was an American novelist and short story writer. His Wonder-Book and Tanglewood Tales are children’s classics. He also wrote The Scarlet Letter, Blithedale Romance, The House of Seven Gables, The Marble Faun. With his superb creation of dark-hued atmosphere, his symbolism, and his blend of realistic detail and romantic-even melodramatic theme, Hawthorne stands as one of America’s top novelists. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) was an American novelist and short story writer. His Wonder-Book and Tanglewood Tales are children’s classics. He also wrote The Scarlet Letter, Blithedale Romance, The House of Seven Gables, The Marble Faun. With his superb creation of dark-hued atmosphere, his symbolism, and his blend of realistic detail and romantic-even melodramatic theme, Hawthorne stands as one of America’s top novelists. This image of Hawthorne dates to the early 1900s. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557830.jpg
Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) was an American novelist and short story writer. His Wonder-Book and Tanglewood Tales are children’s classics. He also wrote The Scarlet Letter, Blithedale Romance, The House of Seven Gables, The Marble Faun. With his superb creation of dark-hued atmosphere, his symbolism, and his blend of realistic detail and romantic-even melodramatic theme, Hawthorne stands as one of America’s top novelists. This image of Hawthorne dates to the early 1900s. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) was an American novelist and short story writer. His Wonder-Book and Tanglewood Tales are children’s classics. He also wrote The Scarlet Letter, Blithedale Romance, The House of Seven Gables, The Marble Faun. With his superb creation of dark-hued atmosphere, his symbolism, and his blend of realistic detail and romantic-even melodramatic theme, Hawthorne stands as one of America’s top novelists. This image of Hawthorne dates to the early 1900s. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557831.jpg
Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) was an American novelist and short story writer. His Wonder-Book and Tanglewood Tales are children’s classics. He also wrote The Scarlet Letter, Blithedale Romance, The House of Seven Gables, The Marble Faun. With his superb creation of dark-hued atmosphere, his symbolism, and his blend of realistic detail and romantic-even melodramatic theme, Hawthorne stands as one of America’s top novelists. This image of Hawthorne dates to the early 1900s. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
This illustrations dates to the early 1900s and shows Hester Prynne from Nathaniel Hawthorne's Scarlet Letter. The caption reads: Hester Prynne - The point which drew all eyes, and, as it were, transfigured thw wearer...was the Scarlet Letter so fantastically embroidered, illuminated upon her bosom. Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) was an American novelist and short story writer. His Wonder-Book and Tanglewood Tales are children’s classics. He also wrote The Scarlet Letter, Blithedale Romance, The House of Seven Gables, The Marble Faun. With his superb creation of dark-hued atmosphere, his symbolism, and his blend of realistic detail and romantic-even melodramatic theme, Hawthorne stands as one of America’s top novelists.  © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557832.jpg
This illustrations dates to the early 1900s and shows Hester Prynne from Nathaniel Hawthorne's Scarlet Letter. The caption reads: Hester Prynne - The point which drew all eyes, and, as it were, transfigured thw wearer...was the Scarlet Letter so fantastically embroidered, illuminated upon her bosom. Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) was an American novelist and short story writer. His Wonder-Book and Tanglewood Tales are children’s classics. He also wrote The Scarlet Letter, Blithedale Romance, The House of Seven Gables, The Marble Faun. With his superb creation of dark-hued atmosphere, his symbolism, and his blend of realistic detail and romantic-even melodramatic theme, Hawthorne stands as one of America’s top novelists. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows a cup and cone.The most active ingredient in the reduction of the metal is the carbonic oxide gas produced in the furnace by the incomplete combustion of the carbon of the coal. If the gases are withdrawn from the furnace without checking the upward curent, the processes could not suffer in any way. One effective way doing this is shown here: a section through the upper part of the smelting furnce, with the "cup and cone" arrangement. The mouth of the furnace is covered by a shallow iron cone (a) open at the bottom, into which fits another cone (b), attached to a chain (c), sustained by an arm of the lever (d) which is firmly held in the required position by the chain (e) and is also provided with a counterpoise (f). In this position the muth of the furnace is closed and the gases find an exit by the opening (g), seen behind the cones, and leading into a passage through which the gases are conveyed to the place where they are required to be burnt.  © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557827.jpg
This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows a cup and cone.The most active ingredient in the reduction of the metal is the carbonic oxide gas produced in the furnace by the incomplete combustion of the carbon of the coal. If the gases are withdrawn from the furnace without checking the upward curent, the processes could not suffer in any way. One effective way doing this is shown here: a section through the upper part of the smelting furnce, with the "cup and cone" arrangement. The mouth of the furnace is covered by a shallow iron cone (a) open at the bottom, into which fits another cone (b), attached to a chain (c), sustained by an arm of the lever (d) which is firmly held in the required position by the chain (e) and is also provided with a counterpoise (f). In this position the muth of the furnace is closed and the gases find an exit by the opening (g), seen behind the cones, and leading into a passage through which the gases are conveyed to the place where they are required to be burnt. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
This illustration dates to the early 1900s and shows Peter Goldthwaite from Nathaniel Hawthorne's short story titled "Peter Goldthwaite's Treasure." The caption reads: He uplifted the axe, and laid about him so vigorously that the dust flew, the boards crashed.Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) was an American novelist and short story writer. His Wonder-Book and Tanglewood Tales are children’s classics. He also wrote The Scarlet Letter, Blithedale Romance, The House of Seven Gables, The Marble Faun. With his superb creation of dark-hued atmosphere, his symbolism, and his blend of realistic detail and romantic-even melodramatic theme, Hawthorne stands as one of America’s top novelists.  © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557828.jpg
This illustration dates to the early 1900s and shows Peter Goldthwaite from Nathaniel Hawthorne's short story titled "Peter Goldthwaite's Treasure." The caption reads: He uplifted the axe, and laid about him so vigorously that the dust flew, the boards crashed.Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) was an American novelist and short story writer. His Wonder-Book and Tanglewood Tales are children’s classics. He also wrote The Scarlet Letter, Blithedale Romance, The House of Seven Gables, The Marble Faun. With his superb creation of dark-hued atmosphere, his symbolism, and his blend of realistic detail and romantic-even melodramatic theme, Hawthorne stands as one of America’s top novelists. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows the apparatur for making Bessemer steel. The Bessemer process was the first method discovered for mass-producing steel. It was named for Sir Henry Bessemer of England. The vessel, converter,  in which it took place, is an egg-shaped vessel, about 3.5 feet in diameter, made of wrought iron in two parts and lined in the inside with a thick infusible coating made from ground fire-bricks and a certain kind of sandstone. The two parts are united by flanges strongly bolted together, and the converter swings on trunnions, one of which is hollow and admits the airblast by the pipe (b) to the base of the vessel. The pipe, which turns on the trunnion with the converter,  conducts the air to a kind of chamber (d) from which it passes into the vessel through about fifty holes of .5 inches diameter. To the other trunnion a toothed wheel is attached, which engages the teeth of the rack receiving motion from hydraulic pressure in a cylinder.  The iron for the operartion is melted in a furnace having its hearth above the level of the converter, which is turned so that its axis is horizontal and its mouth upward. In this position, it is ready to receive the molten iron, which is conveyed to it by a trough, lined with sand, when the furnace is tapped. C here is the trough; A, the converters; B is the axis of the converter; the crane or revolving table is D; the  handles are H. The vessel into which the molten steel is poured from the converter is E.  © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557822.jpg
This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows the apparatur for making Bessemer steel. The Bessemer process was the first method discovered for mass-producing steel. It was named for Sir Henry Bessemer of England. The vessel, converter, in which it took place, is an egg-shaped vessel, about 3.5 feet in diameter, made of wrought iron in two parts and lined in the inside with a thick infusible coating made from ground fire-bricks and a certain kind of sandstone. The two parts are united by flanges strongly bolted together, and the converter swings on trunnions, one of which is hollow and admits the airblast by the pipe (b) to the base of the vessel. The pipe, which turns on the trunnion with the converter, conducts the air to a kind of chamber (d) from which it passes into the vessel through about fifty holes of .5 inches diameter. To the other trunnion a toothed wheel is attached, which engages the teeth of the rack receiving motion from hydraulic pressure in a cylinder. The iron for the operartion is melted in a furnace having its hearth above the level of the converter, which is turned so that its axis is horizontal and its mouth upward. In this position, it is ready to receive the molten iron, which is conveyed to it by a trough, lined with sand, when the furnace is tapped. C here is the trough; A, the converters; B is the axis of the converter; the crane or revolving table is D; the handles are H. The vessel into which the molten steel is poured from the converter is E. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows a cupola furnace. This type of furnce was the primary method of melting that was used in iron foundries. Henry Bessemer was an English inventor and his invention of a steelmaking process was key to the production of steel from the mid 1800s to around 1950. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557823.jpg
This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows a cupola furnace. This type of furnce was the primary method of melting that was used in iron foundries. Henry Bessemer was an English inventor and his invention of a steelmaking process was key to the production of steel from the mid 1800s to around 1950. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows a Bessemer converter. The caption reads: Bessemer Converter. A Front view, showing the mouth (c); B, Section. The Bessemer process was the first method discovered for mass-producing steel. It was named for Sir Henry Bessemer of England. The vessel, converter,  in which it took place is shown here. It is an egg-shaped vessel, about 3.5 feet in diameter, made of wrought iron in two parts and lined in the inside with a thick infusible coating made from ground fire-bricks and a certain kind of sandstone. The two parts are united by flanges strongly bolted together, and the converter swings on trunnions, one of which is hollow and admits the airblast by the pipe (b) to the base of the vessel. The pipe, which turns on the trunnion with the converter,  conducts the air to a kind of chamber (d) from which it passes into the vessel through about fifty holes of .5 inches diameter. To the other trunnion a toothed wheel is attached, which engages the teeth of the rack receiving motion from hydraulic pressure in a cylinder.  The iron for the operartion is melted in a furnace having its hearth above the level of the converter, which is turned so that its axis is horizontal and its mouth upward. In this position, it is ready to receive the molten iron, which is conveyed to it by a trough, lined with sand, when the furnace is tapped. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557824.jpg
This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows a Bessemer converter. The caption reads: Bessemer Converter. A Front view, showing the mouth (c); B, Section. The Bessemer process was the first method discovered for mass-producing steel. It was named for Sir Henry Bessemer of England. The vessel, converter, in which it took place is shown here. It is an egg-shaped vessel, about 3.5 feet in diameter, made of wrought iron in two parts and lined in the inside with a thick infusible coating made from ground fire-bricks and a certain kind of sandstone. The two parts are united by flanges strongly bolted together, and the converter swings on trunnions, one of which is hollow and admits the airblast by the pipe (b) to the base of the vessel. The pipe, which turns on the trunnion with the converter, conducts the air to a kind of chamber (d) from which it passes into the vessel through about fifty holes of .5 inches diameter. To the other trunnion a toothed wheel is attached, which engages the teeth of the rack receiving motion from hydraulic pressure in a cylinder. The iron for the operartion is melted in a furnace having its hearth above the level of the converter, which is turned so that its axis is horizontal and its mouth upward. In this position, it is ready to receive the molten iron, which is conveyed to it by a trough, lined with sand, when the furnace is tapped. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows the apparatur for making Bessemer steel. The Bessemer process was the first method discovered for mass-producing steel. It was named for Sir Henry Bessemer of England. The vessel, converter,  in which it took place, is an egg-shaped vessel, about 3.5 feet in diameter, made of wrought iron in two parts and lined in the inside with a thick infusible coating made from ground fire-bricks and a certain kind of sandstone. The two parts are united by flanges strongly bolted together, and the converter swings on trunnions, one of which is hollow and admits the airblast by the pipe (b) to the base of the vessel. The pipe, which turns on the trunnion with the converter,  conducts the air to a kind of chamber (d) from which it passes into the vessel through about fifty holes of .5 inches diameter. To the other trunnion a toothed wheel is attached, which engages the teeth of the rack receiving motion from hydraulic pressure in a cylinder.  The iron for the operartion is melted in a furnace having its hearth above the level of the converter, which is turned so that its axis is horizontal and its mouth upward. In this position, it is ready to receive the molten iron, which is conveyed to it by a trough, lined with sand, when the furnace is tapped. C here is the trough; A, the converters; B is the axis of the converter; the crane or revolving table is D; the  handles are H. The vessel into which the molten steel is poured from the converter is E.  © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557825.jpg
This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows the apparatur for making Bessemer steel. The Bessemer process was the first method discovered for mass-producing steel. It was named for Sir Henry Bessemer of England. The vessel, converter, in which it took place, is an egg-shaped vessel, about 3.5 feet in diameter, made of wrought iron in two parts and lined in the inside with a thick infusible coating made from ground fire-bricks and a certain kind of sandstone. The two parts are united by flanges strongly bolted together, and the converter swings on trunnions, one of which is hollow and admits the airblast by the pipe (b) to the base of the vessel. The pipe, which turns on the trunnion with the converter, conducts the air to a kind of chamber (d) from which it passes into the vessel through about fifty holes of .5 inches diameter. To the other trunnion a toothed wheel is attached, which engages the teeth of the rack receiving motion from hydraulic pressure in a cylinder. The iron for the operartion is melted in a furnace having its hearth above the level of the converter, which is turned so that its axis is horizontal and its mouth upward. In this position, it is ready to receive the molten iron, which is conveyed to it by a trough, lined with sand, when the furnace is tapped. C here is the trough; A, the converters; B is the axis of the converter; the crane or revolving table is D; the handles are H. The vessel into which the molten steel is poured from the converter is E. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows experiments at Baxter House at producing steel. On of the key figures in doing so was a Mr. Bessemer, who discovered that carbon and silicon may be readily removed by forcing currents of cold air through a mass of fused metal and announced his discovery in 1856. HIS PAPER WAS TITLED "ON THE MANUFACTURE OF IRON AND STEEL WITHOUT FUEL." Bessemer carried out experiments at Baxter House in in England - as shown here. The apparatus used in these experiments was a cylindrical vessel, in the bottom of which were a number of clay nozzles (tuyeres) through which the blast from a blowing machine could be forced. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557826.jpg
This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows experiments at Baxter House at producing steel. On of the key figures in doing so was a Mr. Bessemer, who discovered that carbon and silicon may be readily removed by forcing currents of cold air through a mass of fused metal and announced his discovery in 1856. HIS PAPER WAS TITLED "ON THE MANUFACTURE OF IRON AND STEEL WITHOUT FUEL." Bessemer carried out experiments at Baxter House in in England - as shown here. The apparatus used in these experiments was a cylindrical vessel, in the bottom of which were a number of clay nozzles (tuyeres) through which the blast from a blowing machine could be forced. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Daniel Boone  (1734-1820) was an American frontiersman who was born in Reading, Pennsylvania. In March of 1775, as advance agent for Transylvania Co., he blazed Wilderness Road and founded Boonesboro (also spelled Boonesborough) on Kentucky River. He was captured by Indians in 1778, but he escaped and moved to Missouri after land titles in Kentucky were invalidated. His adventures became well-known through the so-called autobiographical account by John Filson.This illustration is from the book titled: Story of the Wild West and Camp Fire Chats: Being the Complete and Authentic History of the Great Heroes of the Western Plains, Buffalo Bill, Wild Bill, Kit Carson, Daniel Boone, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, and Generals Crooks, Miles and Custer. It was first published in 1888. This edition was published in 1902. It is by Buffalo Bill (1846-1917), an American plainsman, scout, and showman. His real name was William Frederick Cody. He organized Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show in 1883 and toured with it for many years. Caption reads: Glad meeting of Boone and his brother, Squire Boone, Jr. Squire had set out for home on May 1761 and returned July 27 with horses and ammunition supplies. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557818.jpg
Daniel Boone (1734-1820) was an American frontiersman who was born in Reading, Pennsylvania. In March of 1775, as advance agent for Transylvania Co., he blazed Wilderness Road and founded Boonesboro (also spelled Boonesborough) on Kentucky River. He was captured by Indians in 1778, but he escaped and moved to Missouri after land titles in Kentucky were invalidated. His adventures became well-known through the so-called autobiographical account by John Filson.This illustration is from the book titled: Story of the Wild West and Camp Fire Chats: Being the Complete and Authentic History of the Great Heroes of the Western Plains, Buffalo Bill, Wild Bill, Kit Carson, Daniel Boone, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, and Generals Crooks, Miles and Custer. It was first published in 1888. This edition was published in 1902. It is by Buffalo Bill (1846-1917), an American plainsman, scout, and showman. His real name was William Frederick Cody. He organized Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show in 1883 and toured with it for many years. Caption reads: Glad meeting of Boone and his brother, Squire Boone, Jr. Squire had set out for home on May 1761 and returned July 27 with horses and ammunition supplies. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Daniel Boone  (1734-1820) was an American frontiersman who was born in Reading, Pennsylvania. In March of 1775, as advance agent for Transylvania Co., he blazed Wilderness Road and founded Boonesboro (also spelled Boonesborough) on Kentucky River. He was captured by Indians in 1778, but he escaped and moved to Missouri after land titles in Kentucky were invalidated. His adventures became well-known through the so-called autobiographical account by John Filson. The caption for this illustration reads: Escape of Boone and Death of Stuart. This illustration is from the book titled: Story of the Wild West and Camp Fire Chats: Being the Complete and Authentic History of the Great Heroes of the Western Plains, Buffalo Bill, Wild Bill, Kit Carson, Daniel Boone, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, and Generals Crooks, Miles and Custer. It was first published in 1888. This edition was published in 1902. It is by Buffalo Bill (1846-1917), an American plainsman, scout, and showman. His real name was William Frederick Cody. He organized Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show in 1883 and toured with it for many years. John Stuart (also spelled Stewart) was killed by Indians while on expedition around 1760s  with his then wife Hannah's brother "Daniel Boone" © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557819.jpg
Daniel Boone (1734-1820) was an American frontiersman who was born in Reading, Pennsylvania. In March of 1775, as advance agent for Transylvania Co., he blazed Wilderness Road and founded Boonesboro (also spelled Boonesborough) on Kentucky River. He was captured by Indians in 1778, but he escaped and moved to Missouri after land titles in Kentucky were invalidated. His adventures became well-known through the so-called autobiographical account by John Filson. The caption for this illustration reads: Escape of Boone and Death of Stuart. This illustration is from the book titled: Story of the Wild West and Camp Fire Chats: Being the Complete and Authentic History of the Great Heroes of the Western Plains, Buffalo Bill, Wild Bill, Kit Carson, Daniel Boone, Davy Crockett, Sam Houston, and Generals Crooks, Miles and Custer. It was first published in 1888. This edition was published in 1902. It is by Buffalo Bill (1846-1917), an American plainsman, scout, and showman. His real name was William Frederick Cody. He organized Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show in 1883 and toured with it for many years. John Stuart (also spelled Stewart) was killed by Indians while on expedition around 1760s with his then wife Hannah's brother "Daniel Boone" © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Sir Joseph Whitworth (1803-1887) is considered among the top Victorian mechanical engineers. He is best known for his development of a rationalized system of screw threads and for the screw threads that bear his name: British Standard Whitworth (BSW). He proposed this thread system in 1841 and the relevant British Standard is BS 84: 1956. His principal contribution  was his introduction of new standards of accuracy in manufacturing to a degree previously unknown. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557820.jpg
Sir Joseph Whitworth (1803-1887) is considered among the top Victorian mechanical engineers. He is best known for his development of a rationalized system of screw threads and for the screw threads that bear his name: British Standard Whitworth (BSW). He proposed this thread system in 1841 and the relevant British Standard is BS 84: 1956. His principal contribution was his introduction of new standards of accuracy in manufacturing to a degree previously unknown. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Sir Joseph Whitworth (1803-1887) is considered among the top Victorian mechanical engineers. He is best known for his development of a rationalized system of screw threads and for the screw threads that bear his name: British Standard Whitworth (BSW). He proposed this thread system in 1841 and the relevant British Standard is BS 84: 1956. His principal contribution  was his introduction of new standards of accuracy in manufacturing to a degree previously unknown. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
ENWG0557821.jpg
Sir Joseph Whitworth (1803-1887) is considered among the top Victorian mechanical engineers. He is best known for his development of a rationalized system of screw threads and for the screw threads that bear his name: British Standard Whitworth (BSW). He proposed this thread system in 1841 and the relevant British Standard is BS 84: 1956. His principal contribution was his introduction of new standards of accuracy in manufacturing to a degree previously unknown. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works

best live chat