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"Illustration"

Laure de Sade, Comtesse Adhéaume de Chevigné, Oil on canvas, 45 1/2 x 29 in. (115.6 x 73.7 cm), Paintings, Federico de Madrazo y de Ochoa (Spanish, Paris 1875–1934)  ©Liszt Collection / TopFoto / The Image Works
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Laure de Sade, Comtesse Adhéaume de Chevigné, Oil on canvas, 45 1/2 x 29 in. (115.6 x 73.7 cm), Paintings, Federico de Madrazo y de Ochoa (Spanish, Paris 1875–1934) ©Liszt Collection / TopFoto / The Image Works
Illustration, White-Ear looking down the valley and sniffing the air.  1912 ©Mary Evans / The Image Works
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Illustration, White-Ear looking down the valley and sniffing the air. 1912 ©Mary Evans / The Image Works
Theatre: Marionette Show. “Marionette show”. Col. wood engraving, c. 1890. From: Zur guten Stunde.  ©akg-images / The Image Works
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Theatre: Marionette Show. “Marionette show”. Col. wood engraving, c. 1890. From: Zur guten Stunde. ©akg-images / The Image Works
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart; composer. *1756-1791+. – “Da Ponte is pulling the strings” (Mozart with his librettist Lorenzo da Ponte; 1749–1838. Don Giovanni as puppet theatre). Drawing by Rainer Ehrt (born 1960). Pen and ink and acrylic. From the series: 12 drawings, Mozart-Jahr 2006.  ©Ehrt / akg-images / The Image Works
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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart; composer. *1756-1791+.
– “Da Ponte is pulling the strings” (Mozart with his librettist Lorenzo da Ponte; 1749–1838. Don Giovanni as puppet theatre). Drawing by Rainer Ehrt (born 1960). Pen and ink and acrylic. From the series: 12 drawings, Mozart-Jahr 2006. ©Ehrt / akg-images / The Image Works
Alade Joseph Lorentz, (1813- ca.1858). Caricature of George Sand. 1848. Caricature of George Sand for Miroir Drolatique. FRANCE. Paris. National Library.  ©Iberfoto / The Image Works
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Alade Joseph Lorentz, (1813- ca.1858). Caricature of George Sand. 1848. Caricature of George Sand for Miroir Drolatique. FRANCE. Paris. National Library. ©Iberfoto / The Image Works
Paris, France:  Omnibus of the "Dames blanches" company- Madeleine to porte Saint-Martin line. Lithograph by Gihaut after Auguste Raffet (1804-1860). Bibliothèque de la ville de Paris. Around 1830. © Roger-Viollet / The Image Works
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Paris, France: Omnibus of the "Dames blanches" company- Madeleine to porte Saint-Martin line. Lithograph by Gihaut after Auguste Raffet (1804-1860). Bibliothèque de la ville de Paris. Around 1830. © Roger-Viollet / The Image Works
Promotional postcard for Theodore & Co. by H. M. Harwood & George Grossmith from “Theodore & Cie” by Marcel Nancey & Paul Gavrault (Theatre des Nouveautes, Paris, 29th September 1909); music Ivor Novello & Jerome Kern. First produced at the Gaiety Theatre, 19th September 1916. For George Dance’s Co., touring to New Theatre, Cambridge, 1st March 1917.  ©Michael Diamond / Mary Evans / The Image Works
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Promotional postcard for Theodore & Co. by H. M. Harwood & George Grossmith from “Theodore & Cie” by Marcel Nancey & Paul Gavrault (Theatre des Nouveautes, Paris, 29th September 1909); music Ivor Novello & Jerome Kern. First produced at the Gaiety Theatre, 19th September 1916. For George Dance’s Co., touring to New Theatre, Cambridge, 1st March 1917. ©Michael Diamond / Mary Evans / The Image Works
DR. KENNION'S STREET COFFEE-URN CART-A GOOD TEMPERANCE MOVEMENT. DRAWN W. A. ROGERS, US, USA, AMERICA, UNITED STATES, AMERICAN, ENGRAVING 1880 ©Liszt Collection / TopFoto / The Image Works
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DR. KENNION'S STREET COFFEE-URN CART-A GOOD TEMPERANCE MOVEMENT. DRAWN W. A. ROGERS, US, USA, AMERICA, UNITED STATES, AMERICAN, ENGRAVING 1880 ©Liszt Collection / TopFoto / The Image Works
Plan of Blast Furnace - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows a blast furnace in Great Britain, where the enormous quantity of iron produced from clay ironstone was first obtained in the state of cast iron by the process of smelting. In this process the clay ironstone is roasted after having been broken up into lumps. When ready, the ore is then put in a blast furnace (seen here), a structure about 40 to 50 feet high and 12 to 17 fet in internal diameter at its widest part. At E is the crucible, the bottom of which is called the hearth, and is usually formed of infusible sandstone. A is the tympstone and above it an opening through which the slag overflows. O is an opening for the pipes or tuyeres (plan of tuyeres shown here), which are connected with blowing machines supplying a constant blast of air. At the lowest point of the furnace is a tap-hole, which is completely closed by sand and clay, except when opened to allow the melted metal to be drawn off. Around the chimney is a gallery and at C is an opening through which the charges are introduced.     © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
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Plan of Blast Furnace - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows a blast furnace in Great Britain, where the enormous quantity of iron produced from clay ironstone was first obtained in the state of cast iron by the process of smelting. In this process the clay ironstone is roasted after having been broken up into lumps. When ready, the ore is then put in a blast furnace (seen here), a structure about 40 to 50 feet high and 12 to 17 fet in internal diameter at its widest part. At E is the crucible, the bottom of which is called the hearth, and is usually formed of infusible sandstone. A is the tympstone and above it an opening through which the slag overflows. O is an opening for the pipes or tuyeres (plan of tuyeres shown here), which are connected with blowing machines supplying a constant blast of air. At the lowest point of the furnace is a tap-hole, which is completely closed by sand and clay, except when opened to allow the melted metal to be drawn off. Around the chimney is a gallery and at C is an opening through which the charges are introduced. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Section of Blast Furnace - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows a blast furnace in Great Britain, where the enormous quantity of iron produced from clay ironstone was first obtained in the state of cast iron by the process of smelting. In this process the clay ironstone is roasted after having been broken up into lumps. When ready, the ore is then put in a blast furnace (seen here), a structure about 40 to 50 feet high and 12 to 17 fet in internal diameter at its widest part. At E is the crucible, the bottom of which is called the hearth, and is usually formed of infusible sandstone. A is the tympstone and above it an opening through which the slag overflows. O is an opening for the pipes, which are connected with blowing machines supplying a constant blast of air. At the lowest point of the furnace is a tap-hole, which is completely closed by sand and clay, except when opened to allow the melted metal to be drawn off. Around the chimney is a gallery and at C is an opening through which the charges are introduced. Access is obtained to this gallery, a portion of which is seen at the left-hand side here.     © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
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Section of Blast Furnace - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows a blast furnace in Great Britain, where the enormous quantity of iron produced from clay ironstone was first obtained in the state of cast iron by the process of smelting. In this process the clay ironstone is roasted after having been broken up into lumps. When ready, the ore is then put in a blast furnace (seen here), a structure about 40 to 50 feet high and 12 to 17 fet in internal diameter at its widest part. At E is the crucible, the bottom of which is called the hearth, and is usually formed of infusible sandstone. A is the tympstone and above it an opening through which the slag overflows. O is an opening for the pipes, which are connected with blowing machines supplying a constant blast of air. At the lowest point of the furnace is a tap-hole, which is completely closed by sand and clay, except when opened to allow the melted metal to be drawn off. Around the chimney is a gallery and at C is an opening through which the charges are introduced. Access is obtained to this gallery, a portion of which is seen at the left-hand side here. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Blast Furnace - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows a blast furnace in Great Britain, where the enormous quantity of iron produced from clay ironstone was first obtained in the state of cast iron by the process of smelting. In thisprocess the clay ironstone is roasted after having been broken up into lumps. When ready, the ore is then put in a blast furnace (seen here), a structure about 40 to 50 feet high and 12 to 17 fet in internal diameter at its widest part.     © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
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Blast Furnace - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows a blast furnace in Great Britain, where the enormous quantity of iron produced from clay ironstone was first obtained in the state of cast iron by the process of smelting. In thisprocess the clay ironstone is roasted after having been broken up into lumps. When ready, the ore is then put in a blast furnace (seen here), a structure about 40 to 50 feet high and 12 to 17 fet in internal diameter at its widest part. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Aerolite in British Museum - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows an aerolite in the British Museum in London, England. The aerolites or meteoric stones, which fall onto Earth from outer space, consist usually of little else than metallic iron, alloyed with a little nickel. These meteorites are sometimes huge. One found in South America is calculated to weight 14 tons.     © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
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Aerolite in British Museum - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows an aerolite in the British Museum in London, England. The aerolites or meteoric stones, which fall onto Earth from outer space, consist usually of little else than metallic iron, alloyed with a little nickel. These meteorites are sometimes huge. One found in South America is calculated to weight 14 tons. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Foundry - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows a foundry, a workshop or factory for casting metal, in England in the 1870s.     © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
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Foundry - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows a foundry, a workshop or factory for casting metal, in England in the 1870s. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Great Steam Hammer Royal Gun Factory Woolwich - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows the Great Steam Hammer Royal Gun Factory Woolwich. The hammer was, at the time, thought to be one of the most powerful steam hammers ever constructed. Its purpose was to forge great guns for the British Navy. The hammer was made by Nasymth & Co. Its height is about 50 feet and it is surrounded with furnaces and powerful cranes, carrying the huge iron tomgs that are to grap the glowing masses. Th hammer descend not merely with its own weight of 30 tons; steam is injected behind the falling piston, which is thus driven down with vastly enhanced rapidity and impulse.     © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
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Great Steam Hammer Royal Gun Factory Woolwich - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows the Great Steam Hammer Royal Gun Factory Woolwich. The hammer was, at the time, thought to be one of the most powerful steam hammers ever constructed. Its purpose was to forge great guns for the British Navy. The hammer was made by Nasymth & Co. Its height is about 50 feet and it is surrounded with furnaces and powerful cranes, carrying the huge iron tomgs that are to grap the glowing masses. Th hammer descend not merely with its own weight of 30 tons; steam is injected behind the falling piston, which is thus driven down with vastly enhanced rapidity and impulse. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Merryweather's Steam Fire Engine - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows Merryweather's Steam Fire Engine. Merryweather &Sons was an 1800s firm in the Clapham (later Greenwich) section of London that produced steam fire engines and steam tram engines. They had vertical boiler (as seen here) that they put onto a platform that was then drawn by horses. It improved fire pressure - great for fighting fires.     © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
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Merryweather's Steam Fire Engine - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows Merryweather's Steam Fire Engine. Merryweather &Sons was an 1800s firm in the Clapham (later Greenwich) section of London that produced steam fire engines and steam tram engines. They had vertical boiler (as seen here) that they put onto a platform that was then drawn by horses. It improved fire pressure - great for fighting fires. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Iron in Architecture - Crystal Palace - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows the Crystal Palace at Sydenham Hill, a wealthy suburb in the area of London. It was an enormous glass and iron structure that was built in 1851 for the Great Exhibition held in 1851 in Hyde Park in London. The Exhibition was Prince Albert's idea to showcase the industrial achievements of Great Britain. Other countries, including the United States, Russia, and Egypt exhibited as well.  The Crystal Palace was designed by Sir Joseph Paxton. Shown here is the interior of the high, barre-vaulted transept thatran across the center of the building. It was deisgned to be positioned at 90 degrees to the main gallery and incorporated into it several tall elm trees that otherwise would have been cut down.     © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
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Iron in Architecture - Crystal Palace - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows the Crystal Palace at Sydenham Hill, a wealthy suburb in the area of London. It was an enormous glass and iron structure that was built in 1851 for the Great Exhibition held in 1851 in Hyde Park in London. The Exhibition was Prince Albert's idea to showcase the industrial achievements of Great Britain. Other countries, including the United States, Russia, and Egypt exhibited as well. The Crystal Palace was designed by Sir Joseph Paxton. Shown here is the interior of the high, barre-vaulted transept thatran across the center of the building. It was deisgned to be positioned at 90 degrees to the main gallery and incorporated into it several tall elm trees that otherwise would have been cut down. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Nasymth's Steam Hammer - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows Nasmyth's Steam Hammer. James Nasmyth was a Scottish engineer who gained fame for his development of the steam hammer. He was co-founder of Nasmyth, Gaskell and Company manufacturers of machine tools. With the steam hammer, the steam is admitted below the piston, which is thus raised to any required height within the limits of the stroke. When the communication with the boiler is shut off and the steam below the piston is allowed to escape, the piston, with the mass of ironforming the hammer attached to the piston-rod, falls by its own weight. This weight, in large steam hammers, amounts to several tons; and the force of the blow will depend jointly upon the weight of the hammer, and upon the height from which it is allowed to fall. The steam is admitted and allowed to escape by valves, moved by a lever under the control of a workman.     © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
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Nasymth's Steam Hammer - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows Nasmyth's Steam Hammer. James Nasmyth was a Scottish engineer who gained fame for his development of the steam hammer. He was co-founder of Nasmyth, Gaskell and Company manufacturers of machine tools. With the steam hammer, the steam is admitted below the piston, which is thus raised to any required height within the limits of the stroke. When the communication with the boiler is shut off and the steam below the piston is allowed to escape, the piston, with the mass of ironforming the hammer attached to the piston-rod, falls by its own weight. This weight, in large steam hammers, amounts to several tons; and the force of the blow will depend jointly upon the weight of the hammer, and upon the height from which it is allowed to fall. The steam is admitted and allowed to escape by valves, moved by a lever under the control of a workman. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Explosion of Boiler - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows an explosion of a boiler, which, considering the time period and the numer of engines in constant use, a very rare occurence. Most likely, in all cases, the explosions are due to the sudden generation of a large quantity of steam and not to an excessive pressure produced gradually.When an explosion occurs, the enormous force of the agent we are dealing with when w bottle up stam in an iron vessel, is shown by the effects produced. This illustration is from a photo taken from an exploded locomotive. You can see how the thick lates of iron have been torn like paper, and the tubes, rods, and levers of the engine twisted in inextricable confusion.     © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
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Explosion of Boiler - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows an explosion of a boiler, which, considering the time period and the numer of engines in constant use, a very rare occurence. Most likely, in all cases, the explosions are due to the sudden generation of a large quantity of steam and not to an excessive pressure produced gradually.When an explosion occurs, the enormous force of the agent we are dealing with when w bottle up stam in an iron vessel, is shown by the effects produced. This illustration is from a photo taken from an exploded locomotive. You can see how the thick lates of iron have been torn like paper, and the tubes, rods, and levers of the engine twisted in inextricable confusion. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Hancock's Steam Omnibus - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows Hancock's Steam Omnibus. At the time and for years , locomotive engines were used to propell carriages such as this one, known as The Sun. Another was The Enterprise Steam Omnibus.  It was designed by Walter Hancock in Stafford, England, and eight toten of these were in use between 1824 and 1842. This lithograph first appeared in 1833.     © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
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Hancock's Steam Omnibus - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows Hancock's Steam Omnibus. At the time and for years , locomotive engines were used to propell carriages such as this one, known as The Sun. Another was The Enterprise Steam Omnibus. It was designed by Walter Hancock in Stafford, England, and eight toten of these were in use between 1824 and 1842. This lithograph first appeared in 1833. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Stephenson's Link Motion - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows Stephenson's link motion. At the time, locomotives were fitted with an ingenious apparatus for reversing the engines that was first adopted by Englishman George Stephenson. Here you see thelink motion, where A, B are two eccentrics oppositely placed on the driving shaft and their rods joined to the ends of the curved bar or link, C D. A slit extends nearly th whole length of this bar and in it works stud E, forming part of the lever, F, g movable about the fixed joint, G, and having its extremity, F, jointed to the rod H that moves like a slide valve. The weight of the link and the eccentric rods is counterpoised with a weight, K, attached to the lever I K, which turns on the fixed center, L. This lever forms one piece with another lever, L M with which it may be turned by pulling the handle of O P, connected with it through the system of jointed rods. By keeping the link nearer or farther from its central position, the throw of the slide-valve will be shorter or longer, and the steam will be shut off from entering the cylinder when a smaller or larger portion of the stroke has been performed.     © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
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Stephenson's Link Motion - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows Stephenson's link motion. At the time, locomotives were fitted with an ingenious apparatus for reversing the engines that was first adopted by Englishman George Stephenson. Here you see thelink motion, where A, B are two eccentrics oppositely placed on the driving shaft and their rods joined to the ends of the curved bar or link, C D. A slit extends nearly th whole length of this bar and in it works stud E, forming part of the lever, F, g movable about the fixed joint, G, and having its extremity, F, jointed to the rod H that moves like a slide valve. The weight of the link and the eccentric rods is counterpoised with a weight, K, attached to the lever I K, which turns on the fixed center, L. This lever forms one piece with another lever, L M with which it may be turned by pulling the handle of O P, connected with it through the system of jointed rods. By keeping the link nearer or farther from its central position, the throw of the slide-valve will be shorter or longer, and the steam will be shut off from entering the cylinder when a smaller or larger portion of the stroke has been performed. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Steam Generator - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows a steam generator - here an arrangement for quickly generationg and superheating steam, in connection with a high-pressure engine.     © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
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Steam Generator - This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows a steam generator - here an arrangement for quickly generationg and superheating steam, in connection with a high-pressure engine. © Newagen Archive / The Image Works
Hana-Bune, from Momoyo-gusa (The World of Things) Vol III, pub.1910 (colour block woodcut) - Hana-Bune, from Momoyo-gusa (The World of Things) Vol III, pub.1910 (colour block woodcut). A Boat Filled with Flowers; ©Historica Graphica / Heritage / The Image Works
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Hana-Bune, from Momoyo-gusa (The World of Things) Vol III, pub.1910 (colour block woodcut) - Hana-Bune, from Momoyo-gusa (The World of Things) Vol III, pub.1910 (colour block woodcut). A Boat Filled with Flowers; ©Historica Graphica / Heritage / The Image Works
Asagao, from Momoyo-gusa (The World of Things) Vol I, pub.1909 (colour block woodcut) - Asagao, from Momoyo-gusa (The World of Things) Vol I, pub.1909 (colour block woodcut). Morning Glory; ©Historica Graphica / Heritage / The Image Works
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Asagao, from Momoyo-gusa (The World of Things) Vol I, pub.1909 (colour block woodcut) - Asagao, from Momoyo-gusa (The World of Things) Vol I, pub.1909 (colour block woodcut). Morning Glory; ©Historica Graphica / Heritage / The Image Works
Peulot / Félix Thorigny.  Le Dhuis, cut of the water reservoir. Work carried out at Ménilmontant to dig the large reservoir. Paris, musée Carnavalet. © Musée Carnavalet/Roger-Viollet/ The Image Works
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Peulot / Félix Thorigny. Le Dhuis, cut of the water reservoir. Work carried out at Ménilmontant to dig the large reservoir. Paris, musée Carnavalet. © Musée Carnavalet/Roger-Viollet/ The Image Works
Herodes the Great, King of the Jews (37-4 BC).-Herodes and his train (on the stairs) visit the completed southwestern entrance of the Temple area (new building of the Temple in Jerusalem under Herodes, building started 20 BC).-Aquarelle, undated, by Peter Connolly (born 1935).  Year of work: 1983.  ©akg-images / Peter Connolly / The Image Works
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Herodes the Great, King of the Jews (37-4 BC).-Herodes and his train (on the stairs) visit the completed southwestern entrance of the Temple area (new building of the Temple in Jerusalem under Herodes, building started 20 BC).-Aquarelle, undated, by Peter Connolly (born 1935). Year of work: 1983. ©akg-images / Peter Connolly / The Image Works

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