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Entire Online Archive: "illcanomanu": 58 results 

Persia / Iran: Detail from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting elephants and rabbits at a pond, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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Persia / Iran: Detail from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting elephants and rabbits at a pond, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a royal court, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034835.jpg
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a royal court, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a royal hunting expedition, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034833.jpg
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a royal hunting expedition, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Iran: Detail from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a royal hunting expedition, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034834.jpg
Persia / Iran: Detail from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a royal hunting expedition, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Iran: Detail from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a royal court, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034836.jpg
Persia / Iran: Detail from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a royal court, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a conclave of various animals, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034837.jpg
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a conclave of various animals, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a meeting of wise men, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034839.jpg
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a meeting of wise men, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Iran: Detail from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a conclave of various animals, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034838.jpg
Persia / Iran: Detail from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a conclave of various animals, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a hunting accident, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034841.jpg
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a hunting accident, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Iran: Detail from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a hunting accident, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034842.jpg
Persia / Iran: Detail from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a hunting accident, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Iran: Detail from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a meeting of wise men, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034840.jpg
Persia / Iran: Detail from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a meeting of wise men, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting lions carrying rabbits, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034862.jpg
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting lions carrying rabbits, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Iran: Detail from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a fish pond, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034861.jpg
Persia / Iran: Detail from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a fish pond, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Iran: Detail from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting lions carrying rabbits, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034863.jpg
Persia / Iran: Detail from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting lions carrying rabbits, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting the fable 'The Scorpion and the Turtle', by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034864.jpg
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting the fable 'The Scorpion and the Turtle', by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a fish pond, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034860.jpg
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a fish pond, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a camel being devoured by various animals, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034866.jpg
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a camel being devoured by various animals, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Iran: Detail from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting the fable 'The Scorpion and the Turtle', by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034865.jpg
Persia / Iran: Detail from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting the fable 'The Scorpion and the Turtle', by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a phoenix flying with various other birds, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034868.jpg
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a phoenix flying with various other birds, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Iran: Detail from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a phoenix flying with various other birds, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034869.jpg
Persia / Iran: Detail from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a phoenix flying with various other birds, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Iran: Detail from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a camel being devoured by various animals, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034867.jpg
Persia / Iran: Detail from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a camel being devoured by various animals, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a man talking to some monkeys, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034882.jpg
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a man talking to some monkeys, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Iran: Detail from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a man talking to some monkeys, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034883.jpg
Persia / Iran: Detail from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a man talking to some monkeys, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a royal hunting expedition, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034884.jpg
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting a royal hunting expedition, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting thieves stealing from a sleeping couple, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.  In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork.  ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0034886.jpg
Persia / Iran: Page from the illuminated manuscript 'The Lights of Canopus' (Anwar-i Suhayli) depicting thieves stealing from a sleeping couple, by Mirza Rahim, 19th century, Iran - The Anwar-i Suhayli or 'The Lights of Canopus', commonly known as the Fables of Bidpai in the West, is a Persian version of the ancient Indian collection of animal fables, the <i>Panchatantra</i>. It tells a tale of a Persian physician, Burzuyah, and his mission to India, where he stumbles upon a book of stories collected from the animals who reside there.

In a similar vein to the <i>Arabian Nights</i>, the fables in the manuscript are inter-woven as the characters of one story recount the next, leading up to three or four degrees of narrative embedding. Many usually have morals or offer philosophical glimpses into human behaviour, emphasising loyalty and teamwork. ©The Walters Art Museum/Pictures From History/ The Image Works

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