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Entire Online Archive: "uspres": 219 results 

George Washington, 22 February 1732 (11 February 1731) – 14 December 1799. First President of the United States  from 1789 to 1797. Picture by Gilbert Stuart. Colourised version.  © Lebrecht/ The Image Works
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George Washington, 22 February 1732 (11 February 1731) – 14 December 1799. First President of the United States from 1789 to 1797. Picture by Gilbert Stuart. Colourised version. © Lebrecht/ The Image Works
Official portrait of President Barack Obama in the Oval Office, Dec. 6, 2012. 44th President of the United States, 2009-2017.  ©Pete Souza / The White House / The Image Works Note: Editorial use only.
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Official portrait of President Barack Obama in the Oval Office, Dec. 6, 2012. 44th President of the United States, 2009-2017. ©Pete Souza / The White House / The Image Works
Note: Editorial use only.
USA: James A Garfield (1831–1881) was the 20th President of the United States, serving from 1877 to 1881. Oil on canvas, 1881 - James Abram Garfield (November 19, 1831 – September 19, 1881) was the 20th President of the United States, serving from March 4, 1881, until his assassination later that year.  Garfield had served nine terms in the House of Representatives, and had been elected to the Senate before his candidacy for the White House, though he declined the Senate seat once he was elected President. He is the only sitting House member to have been elected president.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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USA: James A Garfield (1831–1881) was the 20th President of the United States, serving from 1877 to 1881. Oil on canvas, 1881 - James Abram Garfield (November 19, 1831 – September 19, 1881) was the 20th President of the United States, serving from March 4, 1881, until his assassination later that year.

Garfield had served nine terms in the House of Representatives, and had been elected to the Senate before his candidacy for the White House, though he declined the Senate seat once he was elected President. He is the only sitting House member to have been elected president. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
USA: Chester A. Arthur (1829–1886) was the 21st President of the United States, serving from 1881 to 1885. Photographic portrait, 1882 - Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886) was an American attorney and politician who served as the 21st President of the United States (1881–85); he succeeded James A. Garfield upon the latter's assassination.  At the outset, Arthur struggled to overcome a slightly negative reputation, which stemmed from his early career in politics as part of New York's Republican political machine. He succeeded by embracing the cause of civil service reform. His advocacy for, and subsequent enforcement of, the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act was the centerpiece of his administration.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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USA: Chester A. Arthur (1829–1886) was the 21st President of the United States, serving from 1881 to 1885. Photographic portrait, 1882 - Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886) was an American attorney and politician who served as the 21st President of the United States (1881–85); he succeeded James A. Garfield upon the latter's assassination.

At the outset, Arthur struggled to overcome a slightly negative reputation, which stemmed from his early career in politics as part of New York's Republican political machine. He succeeded by embracing the cause of civil service reform. His advocacy for, and subsequent enforcement of, the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act was the centerpiece of his administration. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
USA: Grover Cleveland (1837 – 1908) was the 22nd and the 24thth President of the United States, serving from 1885 to 1899 and from 1893 to 1897. Photographic portrait, Frederick Gutekunst (1831-1917) 1903 - Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was an American politician and lawyer who served as the 22nd and 24th President of the United States. He won the popular vote for three presidential elections – in 1884, 1888, and 1892 – and was one of the three Democrats (with Andrew Johnson and Woodrow Wilson) to serve as president during the era of Republican political domination dating from 1861 to 1933.  He was also the first and only President in American history to serve two non-consecutive terms in office.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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USA: Grover Cleveland (1837 – 1908) was the 22nd and the 24thth President of the United States, serving from 1885 to 1899 and from 1893 to 1897. Photographic portrait, Frederick Gutekunst (1831-1917) 1903 - Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was an American politician and lawyer who served as the 22nd and 24th President of the United States. He won the popular vote for three presidential elections – in 1884, 1888, and 1892 – and was one of the three Democrats (with Andrew Johnson and Woodrow Wilson) to serve as president during the era of Republican political domination dating from 1861 to 1933.

He was also the first and only President in American history to serve two non-consecutive terms in office. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
USA: Chester A. Arthur (1829–1886) was the 21st President of the United States, serving from 1881 to 1885. Oil on canvas, Daniel Huntington (1816-1906), 1885 - Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886) was an American attorney and politician who served as the 21st President of the United States (1881–85); he succeeded James A. Garfield upon the latter's assassination.  At the outset, Arthur struggled to overcome a slightly negative reputation, which stemmed from his early career in politics as part of New York's Republican political machine. He succeeded by embracing the cause of civil service reform. His advocacy for, and subsequent enforcement of, the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act was the centerpiece of his administration.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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USA: Chester A. Arthur (1829–1886) was the 21st President of the United States, serving from 1881 to 1885. Oil on canvas, Daniel Huntington (1816-1906), 1885 - Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886) was an American attorney and politician who served as the 21st President of the United States (1881–85); he succeeded James A. Garfield upon the latter's assassination.

At the outset, Arthur struggled to overcome a slightly negative reputation, which stemmed from his early career in politics as part of New York's Republican political machine. He succeeded by embracing the cause of civil service reform. His advocacy for, and subsequent enforcement of, the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act was the centerpiece of his administration. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
USA: Grover Cleveland (1837 – 1908) was the 22nd and the 24thth President of the United States, serving from 1885 to 1899 and from 1893 to 1897. Oil on canvas, Eastman Johnson (1824-1906), c. 1906 - Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was an American politician and lawyer who served as the 22nd and 24th President of the United States. He won the popular vote for three presidential elections – in 1884, 1888, and 1892 – and was one of the three Democrats (with Andrew Johnson and Woodrow Wilson) to serve as president during the era of Republican political domination dating from 1861 to 1933.  He was also the first and only President in American history to serve two non-consecutive terms in office.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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USA: Grover Cleveland (1837 – 1908) was the 22nd and the 24thth President of the United States, serving from 1885 to 1899 and from 1893 to 1897. Oil on canvas, Eastman Johnson (1824-1906), c. 1906 - Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was an American politician and lawyer who served as the 22nd and 24th President of the United States. He won the popular vote for three presidential elections – in 1884, 1888, and 1892 – and was one of the three Democrats (with Andrew Johnson and Woodrow Wilson) to serve as president during the era of Republican political domination dating from 1861 to 1933.

He was also the first and only President in American history to serve two non-consecutive terms in office. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
USA: Benjamin Harrison (1833 – 1901) was the 23rd President of the United States, serving from 1889 to 1893. Photographic portrait, 1896 - Benjamin Harrison (August 20, 1833 – March 13, 1901) was an American politician and lawyer who served as the 23rd President of the United States from 1889 to 1893; he was the grandson of the ninth president, William Henry Harrison.  Before ascending to the presidency, Harrison established himself as a prominent local attorney, Presbyterian church leader and politician in Indianapolis, Indiana. During the American Civil War, he served the Union as a colonel and on February 14, 1865 was confirmed by the U.S. Senate as a brevet brigadier general of volunteers.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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USA: Benjamin Harrison (1833 – 1901) was the 23rd President of the United States, serving from 1889 to 1893. Photographic portrait, 1896 - Benjamin Harrison (August 20, 1833 – March 13, 1901) was an American politician and lawyer who served as the 23rd President of the United States from 1889 to 1893; he was the grandson of the ninth president, William Henry Harrison.

Before ascending to the presidency, Harrison established himself as a prominent local attorney, Presbyterian church leader and politician in Indianapolis, Indiana. During the American Civil War, he served the Union as a colonel and on February 14, 1865 was confirmed by the U.S. Senate as a brevet brigadier general of volunteers. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
USA: William McKinley (1843 – 1901) was the 25th President of the United States, serving from 1897 to 1901. Engraving, Bureau of Engraving and Printing, 20th century - William McKinley (January 29, 1843 – September 14, 1901) was an American politician and lawyer who served as the 25th President of the United States from March 4, 1897 until his assassination in September 1901, six months into his second term.  McKinley led the nation to victory in the Spanish–American War, raised protective tariffs to promote American industry, and maintained the nation on the gold standard in a rejection of inflationary proposals.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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USA: William McKinley (1843 – 1901) was the 25th President of the United States, serving from 1897 to 1901. Engraving, Bureau of Engraving and Printing, 20th century - William McKinley (January 29, 1843 – September 14, 1901) was an American politician and lawyer who served as the 25th President of the United States from March 4, 1897 until his assassination in September 1901, six months into his second term.

McKinley led the nation to victory in the Spanish–American War, raised protective tariffs to promote American industry, and maintained the nation on the gold standard in a rejection of inflationary proposals. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
USA: Benjamin Harrison (1833 – 1901) was the 23rd President of the United States, serving from 1889 to 1893. Oil on canvas, Eastman Johnson (1824-1906), 1895 - Benjamin Harrison (August 20, 1833 – March 13, 1901) was an American politician and lawyer who served as the 23rd President of the United States from 1889 to 1893; he was the grandson of the ninth president, William Henry Harrison.  Before ascending to the presidency, Harrison established himself as a prominent local attorney, Presbyterian church leader and politician in Indianapolis, Indiana. During the American Civil War, he served the Union as a colonel and on February 14, 1865 was confirmed by the U.S. Senate as a brevet brigadier general of volunteers.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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USA: Benjamin Harrison (1833 – 1901) was the 23rd President of the United States, serving from 1889 to 1893. Oil on canvas, Eastman Johnson (1824-1906), 1895 - Benjamin Harrison (August 20, 1833 – March 13, 1901) was an American politician and lawyer who served as the 23rd President of the United States from 1889 to 1893; he was the grandson of the ninth president, William Henry Harrison.

Before ascending to the presidency, Harrison established himself as a prominent local attorney, Presbyterian church leader and politician in Indianapolis, Indiana. During the American Civil War, he served the Union as a colonel and on February 14, 1865 was confirmed by the U.S. Senate as a brevet brigadier general of volunteers. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
USA: Theodore Roosevelt (1858 – 1919) was the 26th President of the United States, serving from 1901 to 1909. Engraving, Bureau of Engraving and Printing, 20th century - Theodore Roosevelt Jr. (October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919) was an American statesman, author, explorer, soldier, naturalist, and reformer who served as the 26th President of the United States from 1901 to 1909.  As a leader of the Republican Party during this time, he became a driving force for the Progressive Era in the United States in the early 20th century.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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USA: Theodore Roosevelt (1858 – 1919) was the 26th President of the United States, serving from 1901 to 1909. Engraving, Bureau of Engraving and Printing, 20th century - Theodore Roosevelt Jr. (October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919) was an American statesman, author, explorer, soldier, naturalist, and reformer who served as the 26th President of the United States from 1901 to 1909.

As a leader of the Republican Party during this time, he became a driving force for the Progressive Era in the United States in the early 20th century. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
USA: William Howard Taft (1857 – 1930) was the 27th President of the United States, serving from 1909 to 1913. Photographic portrait, March 1909 - William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) served as the 27th President of the United States (1909–1913) and as the 10th Chief Justice of the United States (1921–1930), the only person to have held both offices.  Taft was elected president in 1908, the chosen successor of Theodore Roosevelt, but was defeated for re-election by Woodrow Wilson in 1912 after Roosevelt split the Republican vote by running as a third-party candidate. In 1921, President Warren G. Harding appointed Taft chief justice, a position in which he served until a month before his death.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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USA: William Howard Taft (1857 – 1930) was the 27th President of the United States, serving from 1909 to 1913. Photographic portrait, March 1909 - William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) served as the 27th President of the United States (1909–1913) and as the 10th Chief Justice of the United States (1921–1930), the only person to have held both offices.

Taft was elected president in 1908, the chosen successor of Theodore Roosevelt, but was defeated for re-election by Woodrow Wilson in 1912 after Roosevelt split the Republican vote by running as a third-party candidate. In 1921, President Warren G. Harding appointed Taft chief justice, a position in which he served until a month before his death. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
USA: William McKinley (1843 – 1901) was the 25th President of the United States, serving from 1897 to 1901. Campaign poster showing William McKinley holding the US flag and standing on a gold coin, c. 1895 - William McKinley (January 29, 1843 – September 14, 1901) was an American politician and lawyer who served as the 25th President of the United States from March 4, 1897 until his assassination in September 1901, six months into his second term.  McKinley led the nation to victory in the Spanish–American War, raised protective tariffs to promote American industry, and maintained the nation on the gold standard in a rejection of inflationary proposals.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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USA: William McKinley (1843 – 1901) was the 25th President of the United States, serving from 1897 to 1901. Campaign poster showing William McKinley holding the US flag and standing on a gold coin, c. 1895 - William McKinley (January 29, 1843 – September 14, 1901) was an American politician and lawyer who served as the 25th President of the United States from March 4, 1897 until his assassination in September 1901, six months into his second term.

McKinley led the nation to victory in the Spanish–American War, raised protective tariffs to promote American industry, and maintained the nation on the gold standard in a rejection of inflationary proposals. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
USA: Theodore Roosevelt (1858 – 1919) was the 26th President of the United States, serving from 1901 to 1909. Oil on canvas, John Singer Sargent  (1856-1925), 1903 - Theodore Roosevelt Jr. (October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919) was an American statesman, author, explorer, soldier, naturalist, and reformer who served as the 26th President of the United States from 1901 to 1909.  As a leader of the Republican Party during this time, he became a driving force for the Progressive Era in the United States in the early 20th century.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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USA: Theodore Roosevelt (1858 – 1919) was the 26th President of the United States, serving from 1901 to 1909. Oil on canvas, John Singer Sargent (1856-1925), 1903 - Theodore Roosevelt Jr. (October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919) was an American statesman, author, explorer, soldier, naturalist, and reformer who served as the 26th President of the United States from 1901 to 1909.

As a leader of the Republican Party during this time, he became a driving force for the Progressive Era in the United States in the early 20th century. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
USA: William McKinley (1843 – 1901) was the 25th President of the United States, serving from 1897 to 1901. Oil on canvas, Harriet Anderson Stubbs Murphy (1852 - 1935), 1902 - William McKinley (January 29, 1843 – September 14, 1901) was an American politician and lawyer who served as the 25th President of the United States from March 4, 1897 until his assassination in September 1901, six months into his second term.  McKinley led the nation to victory in the Spanish–American War, raised protective tariffs to promote American industry, and maintained the nation on the gold standard in a rejection of inflationary proposals.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
ECPA0033553.jpg
USA: William McKinley (1843 – 1901) was the 25th President of the United States, serving from 1897 to 1901. Oil on canvas, Harriet Anderson Stubbs Murphy (1852 - 1935), 1902 - William McKinley (January 29, 1843 – September 14, 1901) was an American politician and lawyer who served as the 25th President of the United States from March 4, 1897 until his assassination in September 1901, six months into his second term.

McKinley led the nation to victory in the Spanish–American War, raised protective tariffs to promote American industry, and maintained the nation on the gold standard in a rejection of inflationary proposals. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
USA: William Howard Taft (1857 – 1930) was the 27th President of the United States, serving from 1909 to 1913. Oil on canvas, Anders Zom (1860 -1920), 1911 - William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) served as the 27th President of the United States (1909–1913) and as the 10th Chief Justice of the United States (1921–1930), the only person to have held both offices.  Taft was elected president in 1908, the chosen successor of Theodore Roosevelt, but was defeated for re-election by Woodrow Wilson in 1912 after Roosevelt split the Republican vote by running as a third-party candidate. In 1921, President Warren G. Harding appointed Taft chief justice, a position in which he served until a month before his death.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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USA: William Howard Taft (1857 – 1930) was the 27th President of the United States, serving from 1909 to 1913. Oil on canvas, Anders Zom (1860 -1920), 1911 - William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) served as the 27th President of the United States (1909–1913) and as the 10th Chief Justice of the United States (1921–1930), the only person to have held both offices.

Taft was elected president in 1908, the chosen successor of Theodore Roosevelt, but was defeated for re-election by Woodrow Wilson in 1912 after Roosevelt split the Republican vote by running as a third-party candidate. In 1921, President Warren G. Harding appointed Taft chief justice, a position in which he served until a month before his death. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
USA: Woodrow Wilson (1856 – 1924) was the 28th President of the United States, serving from 1913 to 1921. Photographic portrait, 1912 - Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924), better known as Woodrow Wilson, was an American politician and academic who served as the 28th President of the United States from 1913 to 1921.  In office, Wilson reintroduced the spoken State of the Union, which had been out of use since 1801. Leading the Congress, now in Democratic hands, he oversaw the passage of progressive legislative policies unparalleled until the New Deal in 1933.  A devoted Presbyterian, Wilson infused a profound sense of moralism into his internationalism, now referred to as 'Wilsonian'—a contentious position in American foreign policy which obligates the United States to promote global democracy. For his sponsorship of the League of Nations, Wilson was awarded the 1919 Nobel Peace Prize.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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USA: Woodrow Wilson (1856 – 1924) was the 28th President of the United States, serving from 1913 to 1921. Photographic portrait, 1912 - Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924), better known as Woodrow Wilson, was an American politician and academic who served as the 28th President of the United States from 1913 to 1921.

In office, Wilson reintroduced the spoken State of the Union, which had been out of use since 1801. Leading the Congress, now in Democratic hands, he oversaw the passage of progressive legislative policies unparalleled until the New Deal in 1933.

A devoted Presbyterian, Wilson infused a profound sense of moralism into his internationalism, now referred to as 'Wilsonian'—a contentious position in American foreign policy which obligates the United States to promote global democracy. For his sponsorship of the League of Nations, Wilson was awarded the 1919 Nobel Peace Prize. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
USA: Woodrow Wilson (1856 – 1924) was the 28th President of the United States, serving from 1913 to 1921. Oil on canvas, Frank Graham Cootes (1879 - 1960), 1913 - Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924), better known as Woodrow Wilson, was an American politician and academic who served as the 28th President of the United States from 1913 to 1921.  In office, Wilson reintroduced the spoken State of the Union, which had been out of use since 1801. Leading the Congress, now in Democratic hands, he oversaw the passage of progressive legislative policies unparalleled until the New Deal in 1933.  A devoted Presbyterian, Wilson infused a profound sense of moralism into his internationalism, now referred to as 'Wilsonian'—a contentious position in American foreign policy which obligates the United States to promote global democracy. For his sponsorship of the League of Nations, Wilson was awarded the 1919 Nobel Peace Prize.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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USA: Woodrow Wilson (1856 – 1924) was the 28th President of the United States, serving from 1913 to 1921. Oil on canvas, Frank Graham Cootes (1879 - 1960), 1913 - Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924), better known as Woodrow Wilson, was an American politician and academic who served as the 28th President of the United States from 1913 to 1921.

In office, Wilson reintroduced the spoken State of the Union, which had been out of use since 1801. Leading the Congress, now in Democratic hands, he oversaw the passage of progressive legislative policies unparalleled until the New Deal in 1933.

A devoted Presbyterian, Wilson infused a profound sense of moralism into his internationalism, now referred to as 'Wilsonian'—a contentious position in American foreign policy which obligates the United States to promote global democracy. For his sponsorship of the League of Nations, Wilson was awarded the 1919 Nobel Peace Prize. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
USA: Warren G. Harding (1865 – 1923) was the 29th President of the United States, serving from 1921 to 1923. Photographic portrait, Harris and Ewing, c. 1920 - Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 – August 2, 1923) was the 29th President of the United States, serving from March 4, 1921 until his death in 1923.  At the time of his death, he was one of the most popular presidents, but the subsequent exposure of scandals that took place under his administration eroded his popular regard.  Harding died of a cerebral hemorrhage caused by heart disease in San Francisco while on a western speaking tour; he was succeeded by his vice president, Calvin Coolidge.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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USA: Warren G. Harding (1865 – 1923) was the 29th President of the United States, serving from 1921 to 1923. Photographic portrait, Harris and Ewing, c. 1920 - Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 – August 2, 1923) was the 29th President of the United States, serving from March 4, 1921 until his death in 1923.

At the time of his death, he was one of the most popular presidents, but the subsequent exposure of scandals that took place under his administration eroded his popular regard.

Harding died of a cerebral hemorrhage caused by heart disease in San Francisco while on a western speaking tour; he was succeeded by his vice president, Calvin Coolidge. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
USA: Warren G. Harding (1865 – 1923) was the 29th President of the United States, serving from 1921 to 1923. Oil on canvas, Edmund Hodgson Smart (1873-1942), 1922 - Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 – August 2, 1923) was the 29th President of the United States, serving from March 4, 1921 until his death in 1923.  At the time of his death, he was one of the most popular presidents, but the subsequent exposure of scandals that took place under his administration eroded his popular regard.  Harding died of a cerebral hemorrhage caused by heart disease in San Francisco while on a western speaking tour; he was succeeded by his vice president, Calvin Coolidge.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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USA: Warren G. Harding (1865 – 1923) was the 29th President of the United States, serving from 1921 to 1923. Oil on canvas, Edmund Hodgson Smart (1873-1942), 1922 - Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 – August 2, 1923) was the 29th President of the United States, serving from March 4, 1921 until his death in 1923.

At the time of his death, he was one of the most popular presidents, but the subsequent exposure of scandals that took place under his administration eroded his popular regard.

Harding died of a cerebral hemorrhage caused by heart disease in San Francisco while on a western speaking tour; he was succeeded by his vice president, Calvin Coolidge. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
USA: Calvin Coolidge (1872 – 1933) was the 30th President of the United States, serving from 1923 to 1929. Photographic portrait, 1919 - John Calvin Coolidge Jr. (July 4, 1872 – January 5, 1933) was the 30th President of the United States (1923–29). A Republican lawyer from Vermont, Coolidge worked his way up the ladder of Massachusetts state politics, eventually becoming governor of that state.  He was elected as the 29th vice president in 1920 and succeeded to the presidency upon the sudden death of Warren G. Harding in 1923. Elected in his own right in 1924, he gained a reputation as a small-government conservative.  Coolidge's retirement was relatively short, as he died at the age of 60 in January 1933, less than two months before his direct successor, Herbert Hoover, left office.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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USA: Calvin Coolidge (1872 – 1933) was the 30th President of the United States, serving from 1923 to 1929. Photographic portrait, 1919 - John Calvin Coolidge Jr. (July 4, 1872 – January 5, 1933) was the 30th President of the United States (1923–29). A Republican lawyer from Vermont, Coolidge worked his way up the ladder of Massachusetts state politics, eventually becoming governor of that state.

He was elected as the 29th vice president in 1920 and succeeded to the presidency upon the sudden death of Warren G. Harding in 1923. Elected in his own right in 1924, he gained a reputation as a small-government conservative.

Coolidge's retirement was relatively short, as he died at the age of 60 in January 1933, less than two months before his direct successor, Herbert Hoover, left office. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
USA: Calvin Coolidge (1872 – 1933) was the 30th President of the United States, serving from 1923 to 1929. Oil on canvas, Charles Sydney Hopkinson (1869 - 1962), 1932 - John Calvin Coolidge Jr. (July 4, 1872 – January 5, 1933) was the 30th President of the United States (1923–29). A Republican lawyer from Vermont, Coolidge worked his way up the ladder of Massachusetts state politics, eventually becoming governor of that state.  He was elected as the 29th vice president in 1920 and succeeded to the presidency upon the sudden death of Warren G. Harding in 1923. Elected in his own right in 1924, he gained a reputation as a small-government conservative.  Coolidge's retirement was relatively short, as he died at the age of 60 in January 1933, less than two months before his direct successor, Herbert Hoover, left office.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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USA: Calvin Coolidge (1872 – 1933) was the 30th President of the United States, serving from 1923 to 1929. Oil on canvas, Charles Sydney Hopkinson (1869 - 1962), 1932 - John Calvin Coolidge Jr. (July 4, 1872 – January 5, 1933) was the 30th President of the United States (1923–29). A Republican lawyer from Vermont, Coolidge worked his way up the ladder of Massachusetts state politics, eventually becoming governor of that state.

He was elected as the 29th vice president in 1920 and succeeded to the presidency upon the sudden death of Warren G. Harding in 1923. Elected in his own right in 1924, he gained a reputation as a small-government conservative.

Coolidge's retirement was relatively short, as he died at the age of 60 in January 1933, less than two months before his direct successor, Herbert Hoover, left office. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
USA: Herbert Hoover (1874 – 1964) was the 31st President of the United States, serving from 1929-1933. Photographic portrait, c. 1928 - Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964) was an American politician who served as the 31st President of the United States from 1929 to 1933. A Republican, as Secretary of Commerce in the 1920s he introduced Progressive Era themes of efficiency in the business community and provided government support for standardization, efficiency and international trade.  As president from 1929 to 1933, his ambitious programs were overwhelmed by the Great Depression, that seemed to get worse every year despite the increasingly large-scale interventions he made in the economy.  He was defeated in a landslide in 1932 by Democrat Franklin D. Roosevelt, and spent the rest of his life as a conservative denouncing big government, liberalism and federal intervention in economic affairs  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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USA: Herbert Hoover (1874 – 1964) was the 31st President of the United States, serving from 1929-1933. Photographic portrait, c. 1928 - Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964) was an American politician who served as the 31st President of the United States from 1929 to 1933. A Republican, as Secretary of Commerce in the 1920s he introduced Progressive Era themes of efficiency in the business community and provided government support for standardization, efficiency and international trade.

As president from 1929 to 1933, his ambitious programs were overwhelmed by the Great Depression, that seemed to get worse every year despite the increasingly large-scale interventions he made in the economy.

He was defeated in a landslide in 1932 by Democrat Franklin D. Roosevelt, and spent the rest of his life as a conservative denouncing big government, liberalism and federal intervention in economic affairs ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
USA: Herbert Hoover (1874 – 1964) was the 31st President of the United States, serving from 1929-1933. Oil on canvas, Elmer Wesley Greene (1907 - 1964), 1956 - Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964) was an American politician who served as the 31st President of the United States from 1929 to 1933. A Republican, as Secretary of Commerce in the 1920s he introduced Progressive Era themes of efficiency in the business community and provided government support for standardization, efficiency and international trade.  As president from 1929 to 1933, his ambitious programs were overwhelmed by the Great Depression, that seemed to get worse every year despite the increasingly large-scale interventions he made in the economy.  He was defeated in a landslide in 1932 by Democrat Franklin D. Roosevelt, and spent the rest of his life as a conservative denouncing big government, liberalism and federal intervention in economic affairs  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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USA: Herbert Hoover (1874 – 1964) was the 31st President of the United States, serving from 1929-1933. Oil on canvas, Elmer Wesley Greene (1907 - 1964), 1956 - Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964) was an American politician who served as the 31st President of the United States from 1929 to 1933. A Republican, as Secretary of Commerce in the 1920s he introduced Progressive Era themes of efficiency in the business community and provided government support for standardization, efficiency and international trade.

As president from 1929 to 1933, his ambitious programs were overwhelmed by the Great Depression, that seemed to get worse every year despite the increasingly large-scale interventions he made in the economy.

He was defeated in a landslide in 1932 by Democrat Franklin D. Roosevelt, and spent the rest of his life as a conservative denouncing big government, liberalism and federal intervention in economic affairs ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
USA: Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882 - 1945) was the 32nd President of the United States, serving from 1933 to 1945. Photographic portrait, 1944 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt served as the 32nd President of the United States, from 1933 to 1945. A Democrat, he won a record four presidential elections and dominated his party after 1932 as a central figure in world events during the mid-20th century, leading the United States during a time of worldwide economic depression and total war.  His program for relief, recovery and reform, known as the New Deal, involved a great expansion of the role of the federal government in the economy. As a dominant leader of the Democratic Party, he built the New Deal Coalition that brought together and united labor unions, big city machines, ethnic whites, African Americans, and rural white Southerners in support of the party.  The Coalition significantly realigned American politics after 1932, creating the Fifth Party System and defining American liberalism throughout the middle third of the 20th century.  ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works
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USA: Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882 - 1945) was the 32nd President of the United States, serving from 1933 to 1945. Photographic portrait, 1944 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt served as the 32nd President of the United States, from 1933 to 1945. A Democrat, he won a record four presidential elections and dominated his party after 1932 as a central figure in world events during the mid-20th century, leading the United States during a time of worldwide economic depression and total war.

His program for relief, recovery and reform, known as the New Deal, involved a great expansion of the role of the federal government in the economy. As a dominant leader of the Democratic Party, he built the New Deal Coalition that brought together and united labor unions, big city machines, ethnic whites, African Americans, and rural white Southerners in support of the party.

The Coalition significantly realigned American politics after 1932, creating the Fifth Party System and defining American liberalism throughout the middle third of the 20th century. ©Pictures From History/ The Image Works

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